Find the Mediterranean mundane Think the Pacific

Find the Mediterranean mundane Think the Pacific

first_imgFind the Mediterranean mundane? Think the Pacific is past it? Over the Atlantic? Then maybe it’s time to set sail for new nautical adventures? Skyscanner introduces seven seas you’ve probably never heard of.1. Inland Sea, JapanThe Seto Inland Sea, to give it its full title, is slightly misleading seeing that this sea is not on land (or inland) at all. It is in fact the body of water that separates Japan’s three main islands: Honshu, Shikoku and Kyushu. Dotted with over 700 islands, many of which are uninhabited, it offers a chance to see a rural, often untouched Japan, and is a popular area for Japanese tourists. Sam Baldwin, Skyscanner Travel Editor and author of For Fukui’s Sake: Two years in rural Japan commented:“The Seto Inland Sea is a beautiful area with many traditional festivals and sites to enjoy. It was also the setting for the high-school horror – Battle Royale. But don’t worry, that was only fiction. I think.”There are numerous entry points for international visitors, including Nagoya airport, and Hiroshima.2. Myrtoan Sea, GreeceThe Myrtoan Sea is a mysterious sea. Often unmarked on modern maps, it was named by The Ancients and is part of the Aegean Sea. Sitting between the Cyclades (a group of about 220 islands), and The Peloponnese (a large peninsula in Southern Greece), the area is known as the ‘true Greece’ and offers beautiful coastlines, welcoming villages, and historical sites, yet remains untouched by mass tourism. Visitors can either take ferries from the mainland, or get flights to Kalamata airport on the Peloponnese peninsula. 7. Sea of Tranquillity, The MoonOfficially called Mare Tranquillitatis, The Sea of Tranquillity is neither tranquil nor actually a sea, seeing as it contains no water. Surrounded by mountains of moon rock, the nightlife here is low key; the last ‘tourists’ to visit were Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong in the 1960s who were too busy making giant leaps for mankind to get the beach ball out. Sadly, with moon flights grounded since then, there’s no way to visit the Sea of Tranquillity right now, however, with Virgin Galactic, the Startram and various other space travel ideas on the horizon, maybe you’ll be able to take a low-gravity bounce along the tranquil sea bed in future.ReturnOne wayMulti-cityFromAdd nearby airports ToAdd nearby airportsDepart14/08/2019Return21/08/2019Cabin Class & Travellers1 adult, EconomyDirect flights onlySearch flights Map 5. Sea of Azov, Ukraine/RussiaLocated in between Ukraine and Russia, the Sea of Azov is the world’s shallowest sea. Officially part of the Black Sea, being connected by the narrow Strait of Kerch, the area is a popular spot for Russians and Ukrainians who flock in summer to enjoy its warm waters. However, the Sea of Azov is generally less developed than the Crimea’s south shore, so outside of these popular resort towns, much of the area remains wild, with deserted beaches, and lone fishermen wandering the shores. Ukraine’s Donetsk is the nearest international airport.6. Coral Sea, Australia/ Papua New Guinea, Solomon IslandsLying off Queensland’s coast, the Coral Sea contains the Great Barrier Reef and is characterised by its warm climate and numerous islands. Hugely popular with scuba divers, the area is rich in aquatic life, and is home to some of the best dive sites in the world. Yachting, spear fishing, kayaking, surfing and just sun bathing are all on offer in the Coral Sea so grab flights to Cairns and enjoy one of Australia’s most beautiful areas. 3. Sea of Galilee, IsraelAlso called Kinneret, the Sea of Galilee is not really a sea, but a lake. The largest in Israel, it also proudly holds the title of the ‘lowest freshwater lake on Earth’. The Sea is a popular holiday spot with its beaches attracting both Israeli tourists as well as international pilgrims, who come to visit the shores that were popularised by The Bible and provided the setting for many of Jesus’ miraculous activities. A recently opened 40-mile hiking and biking path is an ideal way to enjoy the area, and raft building and sailing are also on offer. Fly to Tel Aviv, which is just a couple of hours’ drive away from Kinneret.4. White Sea, RussiaLocated on Russia’s north-west coast, the White Sea, which grazes the Arctic Circle, is largely unvisited by British tourists. Despite not exactly being a ‘hot spot’ (temperatures in summer average just 10C), there are beautiful beaches along the southern shore, where you’ll find locals during the warmer days enjoying the sand and sun. Arkhangelsk airport is the main entry point for visitors who come to this pristine area to enjoy fishing, hunting and wildlife tours. 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