More Indonesian children may become malnourished amid pandemic, UNICEF warns

first_img“COVID-19 has hit vulnerable families the hardest,” Comini said. “Unless we urgently scale up prevention and treatment services for malnourished children, we risk seeing an increase in child illness and deaths linked to malnutrition.”According to UNICEF data, more than 2 million Indonesian children have suffered from severe wasting, while more than 7 million others under 5 years of age experienced stunted growth prior to the pandemic.Statistics Indonesia’s 2015 Intercensal Survey (SUPAS) estimated that the number of children 17 years old or younger in the country was 79.47 million, roughly 30.1 percent of Indonesia’s population of 266 million people in 2019.Globally, the number of malnourished children under the age of 5 is predicted to increase by about 15 percent this year, according to UNICEF.A recent survey conducted by Save the Children Indonesia found that reduced child welfare due to their parents’ loss of or decreased income, as well as limited support for children with disabilities, could increase the risk of malnutrition in 24 million toddlers across the country.UNICEF urged the government to improve public access to staple food items and to continue gathering data from vulnerable households so as to minimize the risk of malnutrition. The number of children suffering from malnutrition could spike in Indonesia as the government has struggled to stem the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the health issue, according to the United Nations International Children’s Fund.In a statement issued on Tuesday, UNICEF warned that job losses, an overloaded healthcare system and limited access to food supplies amid the current health crisis could exacerbate the already poor living conditions of children deemed most susceptible to stunting and wasting.UNICEF Indonesia representative Debora Comini said it was crucial that the government act swiftly to ensure the well-being of children amid the pandemic, particularly those from poor households. Topics :last_img read more

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Governor Wolf: Pension Reform Bill Saves and Protects Taxpayers, Reduces Wall Street Fees

first_img June 08, 2017 Governor Wolf: Pension Reform Bill Saves and Protects Taxpayers, Reduces Wall Street Fees Government Reform,  Government That Works,  Pension Reform,  Press Release,  Statement Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf released the following statement on the bipartisan support and final passage of Senate Bill 1, the pension reform compromise bill, which now heads to his desk for his signature:“The passage of Senate Bill 1 is an example of how Harrisburg can come together to make progress on issues that matter to the people of Pennsylvania. The collaborative and cooperative process that led to consensus is a byproduct of both Republicans and Democrats working with my administration to achieve significant reform.“This pension compromise achieves my foremost goals: continuing to pay down our debt, reducing Wall Street fees, shifting risk away from taxpayers, and providing workers with a fair retirement benefit, while providing long-term relief to school districts.“I look forward to joining members of the House and Senate, from both sides of the aisle, to sign this important bill into law.”The pensions reform compromise bill makes important progress including:It achieves the Governor’s foremost goals: continuing to pay down our debt, reducing Wall Street fees, and shifting risk away from taxpayers, all while providing workers with a fair retirement benefit.The new plan achieves these priorities by preserving a Defined Benefit pension, while also introducing a full Defined Contribution – 401(k) style plan option for new employees.It will save billions of dollars on the unfunded liability and will charge both retirement systems to reduce their Wall Street management fees by a combined $3 billion dollars.Achieving this compromise will also provide long-term relief to school districts, ensuring more future state dollars go directly into the classroom.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Gov. Wolf: State Continues Phased Reopening with 16 More Counties Set to Go Green on June 5

first_imgGov. Wolf: State Continues Phased Reopening with 16 More Counties Set to Go Green on June 5 May 29, 2020 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Press Release,  Public Health With more than 80 percent of the state in some phase of reopening, Governor Tom Wolf today announced that 16 additional counties will take another step forward and move to green effective 12:01 a.m., June 5. Counties include Allegheny, Armstrong, Bedford, Blair, Butler, Cambria, Clinton, Fayette, Fulton, Greene, Indiana, Lycoming, Mercer, Somerset, Washington, and Westmoreland.The first 18 counties moved to green today, including Bradford, Cameron, Centre, Clarion, Clearfield, Crawford, Elk, Forest, Jefferson, Lawrence, McKean, Montour, Potter, Snyder, Sullivan, Tioga, Venango and Warren.Eight counties moved to yellow today, including Dauphin, Franklin, Huntingdon, Lebanon, Luzerne, Monroe, Pike, and Schuylkill.Counties that remain in red and are expected to move to yellow by June 5 include Berks, Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lackawanna, Lancaster, Lehigh, Northampton, Montgomery, and Philadelphia.With more than half the state poised to be in the green phase on June 5, the governor this week provided an updated order for counties moving to green to give businesses and residents a clearer picture of what is permitted in that phase of reopening. The order includes these highlights:• Large gatherings of more than 250 prohibited.• Restaurants and bars open at 50% occupancy.• Personal care services (including hair salons and barbershops) open at 50% occupancy and by appointment only.• Indoor recreation, health and wellness facilities, and personal care services (such as gyms and spas) open at 50% occupancy with appointments strongly encouraged.• All entertainment (such as casinos, theaters, and shopping malls) open at 50% occupancy.• Construction activity may return to full capacity with continued implementation of protocols.• Visitation to prisons and hospitals may resume subject to the discretion of the facility. Visitors who interact with residents and patients must be diligent regarding hygiene. Given the critical importance of limiting COVID-19 exposure in nursing homes, personal care home and long-term care facilities, visitation restrictions will initially remain in place.Business frequently asked questions were also updated and are available here.Gov. Wolf also provided more options for counties in the yellow phase by allowing outdoor dining beginning June 5 and providing Summer Camp Guidance for providers, parents and caregivers.The Summer Camp Guidance includes information on what types of programs for children are permitted during the phased reopening, status of public playgrounds and the operation of community pools, and the status of organized team sports.The state continues to use risk-based metrics from Carnegie Mellon University, combined with contact tracing and testing capability and a sustained reduction in COVID-19 hospitalizations, to make decisions on county moves. The 50 new cases per 100,000 population continues to be a consideration, but not a sole deciding factor.As more counties and residents enjoy loosened restrictions, the governor stressed the need to balance resuming activities with keeping case counts low and taking personal responsibility by wearing a mask or choosing to stay away from crowds to reduce the likelihood of coming into contact with someone carrying COVID-19.“If we take the simple steps of wearing a mask, staying home when sick, and implementing social distancing tactics, we can help eliminate the spread of COVID-19 and make a huge contribution to getting our commonwealth back on track,” Gov. Wolf said.Ver esta página en español.last_img read more

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​PensionDanmark cuts bonds, adds to real assets in face of low yields

first_imgTorben Möger Pedersen, CEO, PensionDanmarkThe high return was due to significant growth from stock markets in the period and rising bond prices as a result of falling yields, the fund said. It also cited stable returns on credit, real estate and infrastructure investments.Möger Pedersen said it was even more important in a low-return investment environment to keep costs down. PensionDanmark’s work on digitalisation by using robot technology and artificial intelligence had aided this effort, he said.The pension fund reported a rise in contributions to DKK6.3bn between January and June this year, from DKK6bn in the same period in 2018. Total assets grew to DKK257bn at the end of June, from DKK240bn at the same point in 2018. PensionDanmark has made further cuts to its government and mortgage bond holdings in favour of real assets, in a bid to temper the impact of low interest rates.In its interim results, the Danish labour-market pension fund reported a rise in pre-tax investment returns for the first half of 2019, to 9.6% and 6% for 45-year-olds and 67-year-olds, respectively. This compared to 0.5% and 0.6% for the age groups in the first half of 2018.Torben Möger Pedersen, PensionDanmark’s chief executive, said: “Of course we are pleased with the great return in the first half of this year. Looking ahead though, we are probably looking at a longer period with low – even negative – yields, waning economic growth and significant geopolitical uncertainty as a result of factors including the trade conflict between the US and China, and Brexit.”Because of this, he said, investors had to adjust to the returns on pension savings becoming markedly lower in the next few years than they were in the last decade. “Our reaction to the low yields is a further reduction in our investments in traditional government and mortgage bonds and continued growth in our investments in sustainable real estate and infrastructure in order to secure a satisfactory return for our members in a zero-interest rate environment,” said Möger Pedersen.In July this year Denmark became the first developed economy to record negative yields on all its government bonds across the yield curve, according to Reuters.Nordic 10-year government bond yieldsChart MakerPensionDanmark reported an overall investment return at this year’s halfway point of DKK17.5bn (€2.3bn) before tax – its highest ever half-year return – compared with DKK1.1bn the year before.last_img read more

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Subsea 7 Buys Out Solstad Farstad from Normand Oceanic JV

first_imgSolstad Farstad has agreed to sell its 50% of the shares in the 50/50 owned joint venture company Normand Oceanic AS to Subsea 7.Normand Oceanic is the vessel owning entity for the flex-lay and heavy construction vessel “Normand Oceanic” which is being managed by Solstad Farstand while under long-term charter to a third party. The vessel is employed under a long term contract for operations in Mexico, and SOFF will remain ship manager for the vessel at least until end of this contract.Following this transaction, Subsea 7 will own 100% of the shares in the joint venture (JV), and will assume all rights and obligations entered into by the JV.Subsea 7 will assume all obligations related to an outstanding loan of approximately $100 million.Jean Cahuzac, Subsea 7 CEO, said: “Our agreement to acquire Normand Oceanic reflects our strategy to own high-specification vessels that differentiate our market leading engineering and construction services to the offshore energy industry. We are focused on actively managing our fleet composition to meet our clients’ requirements and market conditions.”“We have found a solution to the benefit of both JV partners. Subsea 7 has been a long term partner and client, and we look forward to continue this important relationship,” says CEO Lars Peder Solstad.The sale of shares has no cash effect for SOFF, but will give a book loss of approximately NOK 144 million.last_img read more

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Euthanasia referendum: ‘The proposed law isn’t watertight’

first_imgStuff co.nz 31 August 2020Family First Comment: Superb commentary from Grant Illingworth QC – on David Seymour’s “shoddy” euthanasia law.“While superficially attractive, it contains serious shortcomings that create unacceptable risks for vulnerable people. The most glaring example is the lack of any meaningful safeguard against coercion in the Act. Every law student learns about situations in which vulnerable people are pressured into making decisions against their will or their better judgment.”Protect.org.nz#rejectassistedsuicideOPINION: The New Zealand public will shortly be asked to decide whether to give health workers the authority to assist terminally ill people to die. Many people, including now Sir Michael Cullen, think it’s a good idea to give people who are terminally ill a choice about how to end their lives.As New Zealanders, we like the idea of having a choice. We also like the idea of showing compassion towards those who are suffering.Rightly so; but the assisted dying referendum does not involve voting about an idea; it concerns a set of rules that have already been drafted and enacted by Parliament.Those rules will come into force automatically if a majority vote in favour of them.One of the basic requirements of a good statute is that it should build up a sequence of concepts that make logical sense and which, in combination, constitute a sound, consistent and coherent statutory scheme.As with a good recipe, the instructions should all contribute harmoniously to a satisfactory outcome. But if the instructions are not clear, the chef will have only a recipe for confusion.Before endorsing any set of legal rules, we should all be convinced that the proposal is watertight, especially in matters involving life and death.Unfortunately, in this case the proposed law is not watertight.While superficially attractive, it contains serious shortcomings that create unacceptable risks for vulnerable people.The most glaring example is the lack of any meaningful safeguard against coercion in the Act. Every law student learns about situations in which vulnerable people are pressured into making decisions against their will or their better judgment.Pressure of this kind has various legal labels including terms like “undue influence” and “economic duress.” In more colloquial language, we routinely talk about people being “bullied” into doing things they don’t really want to do.Under the proposed law, doctors are required to encourage a person who seeks assisted dying to discuss their wish with others, such as family, friends, and counsellors.But doctors must also ensure the person knows they are not obliged to discuss their wish with anyone.Doctors must “do their best” to ensure that the person is expressing their wish free from pressure by conferring with other health practitioners who are in regular contact with the person and by conferring with members of the person’s family “approved” by the person.But there may be no other health practitioners who are in regular contact with the person and, even if there are, they may know nothing about the family situation.And the duty to confer with members of the family is expressly limited to people who are “approved” by the person.If the person has been bullied into seeking assisted dying, the person is unlikely give their approval. These provisions provide no more than the illusion of safety.An independent medical practitioner must read the person’s medical files, examine the person and reach an opinion about whether the person is eligible for assisted dying. But that practitioner is not required to make any form of assessment concerning possible coercion.There is no requirement for any health professional, at any stage of the process, to ask the person who seeks assisted dying whether someone else has suggested that they make an assisted dying request and, if so, whether that other person has anything to gain from the outcome.No-one has to ask the person whether he or she has been pressured to make the request or whether assisted dying is being sought in order to relieve or help family members.These are questions that must be answered before it could be concluded that the decision to seek assisted dying has been made voluntarily, but no-one has been given the responsibility of asking those questions.The proposed law provides that the assisted dying process must be stopped if, at any time, the health practitioners suspect, on reasonable grounds, that the person is not expressing their wish to receive assisted dying free from pressure from any other person.But this does not amount to a requirement to exclude possible coercion in any proactive way. Importantly, the independent medical practitioner has been given no role to play in the assessment of voluntariness. Put simply, the proposed law does not require any meaningful form of coercion assessment.Another serious problem will be created, too, if the proposed law comes into force. The Crimes Act provides that homicide is the killing of one human being by another.Homicide may be either culpable or not culpable. Culpable homicide is either murder or manslaughter.Homicide is culpable when it consists in the killing of any person by an unlawful act, but it may also be culpable where the offender causes the victim to take their own life as a result of threats, fear of violence, or deception.If a bully only puts emotional pressure on a vulnerable person to commit suicide, the bully can’t be charged with murder or manslaughter, but the bully could be charged with aiding and abetting suicide. It’s a serious crime to counsel or procure any person to commit suicide, or to aid or abet any person in the commission of suicide.It is also a crime to encourage another person to commit suicide, even if they don’t do it.But what if the proposed law is voted into effect and a person accesses assisted dying as a result of being bullied? If the victim is wrongfully pressured into killing himself or herself, even with medical assistance, the bully could be prosecuted and imprisoned for up to 14 years, because the result would still be a form of suicide.But if the bully were careful enough to pressure the victim into being killed by a doctor administering a lethal poison, it seems that no offence would be committed because the result would not be suicide, so no-one could be punished for the wrongful death.This is an unacceptable outcome which has been overlooked in a piece of very shoddy legal drafting.Grant Illingworth QC is a barrister-at-law based in Auckland and is taking part in the #DefendNZ movement to try to block the End of Life Bill from passing into law.https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/euthanasia-debate/300095438/euthanasia-referendum-the-proposed-law-isnt-watertightKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

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‘Trikes’ OK to ply San Jose streets under modified ECQ

first_img“Only 270 tricycle drivers are being allowed to operate in a day,” Untaranadded. SAN JOSE, Antique – Tricycles are now allowed to ply the streets ofthis capital town under the modified enhanced community quarantine of Gov.Rhodora Cadiao implemented in this province, according to mayor Elmer Untaran. Tricycle drivers have agreed taking turns in plying the streets of thiscapital town. They also committed to observe social distancing by taking twopassengers per trip only. This system will continue until the modified ECQ in this province willbe lifted possibly on April 30, “San Jose has around 3,600 tricycle drivers who lost income due to theenhanced community quarantine (ECQ) implementation caused by the coronavirusdisease 2019. But little by little, they are allowed to go back to theirlivelihood,” he said on April 17. He said the vegetables have been delivered to this capital town’s 28barangays, who in turn will sell them to residents. “There are three vendors in every barangay of San Jose who had been deliveredwith vegetables last April 15,” Untaran said.The initiative of making vegetables accessible to residents of barangays herewould avoid people decongesting the markets.center_img The provincial government, through the Office of the ProvincialAgriculture, has allocated P1.5 million to purchase the vegetables from localfarmers. Under the modified enhanced community quarantine (ECQ) of Gov. Rhodora Cadiao, tricycles are now once again allowed to ply the streets of San Jose, Antique. The income of around 3,600 tricycle drivers in this capital town were affected due to the ECQ caused by the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak. PNA “The income of the vendors will be rolled out so that they would havemoney to buy their next supply of vegetables,” the mayor added.(With a report from PNA/PN) Meanwhile, Untaran described the vegetable production initiated by theprovincial government in various barangays in this province as very helpful.last_img read more

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Guardiola embarrassed by treatment of black people

first_imgManchester City manager Pep Guardiola said he is “embarrassed and ashamed” at the historic treatment of black people as the Premier League’s return was marked by protests against racial injustice on Wednesday. Guardiola embarrassed by treatment of black people Players and coaches from all four sides in action took a knee prior to kick off to show their support for the Black Lives Matter campaign. The action came in response to worldwide protests after the killing of African American George Floyd while in police custody in Minneapolis. Black Lives Matter was also emblazoned on the back of shirts instead of player names. “We should send a thousand million messages for the black people. It’s more than 400 years we do what we do to these lovely people,” Guardiola told Sky Sports. “I’m embarrassed and ashamed of what the white people have done for the black people. “Just because you are born a different colour, how people can think they are different? All the gestures are good and positive. Everything we can do to make it conscious, it is not acceptable. “We have to do a lot of things for the black people which we have not done so far.” Read Also: Premier League restarts as players take knee in racism protest “The first 10 minutes it was getting used to the atmosphere and getting the cobwebs off,” said Sterling. “We’ve got to remain within all the safety tips, but all the boys have tested negative in the past few days and we celebrated in the right manner.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Raheem Sterling has been a leading campaigner in the fight against racism in football and the City winger backed the united front as a significant step forward. “I see it as a massive step for the Premier League to allow something like that to happen,” said Sterling. “It shows we are going in the right direction.” Sterling scored his first goal of 2020 to open the scoring as City restarted with a 3-0 win over Arsenal. The England international admitted his side took some time to get to grips with their new surroundings in front of an empty Etihad stadium and said he struggled to hold back from celebrating his goal too wildly with teammates.center_img Loading…last_img read more

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Di Canio approach outdated – Bruce

first_img Di Canio’s controversial reign proved a brief one as he parted company with the club after only 13 matches, his exit coming little more than 24 hours after a 3-0 defeat at West Brom left them rooted to the bottom of the table with one point from five games. It is believed the Italian’s strict regime, unpopular with his players, was key to his departure. Critics rounded on Di Canio’s alleged fascist sympathies, prompting the club to make a stout defence of their new manager. After debates about his political views had died down, Di Canio kept Sunderland in the Barclays Premier League thanks in part to a memorable 3-0 victory over rivals Newcastle at St James’ Park, but little else in his regime went right. Former Sunderland captain Kevin Ball, currently on the club’s coaching staff, steps in to lead the team on a short-term basis, with the club saying a permanent replacement for Di Canio will be announced “in due course”. Bookmakers immediately rated former Chelsea and West Brom manager Roberto Di Matteo as favourite, narrowly ahead of Gus Poyet, previously boss at Brighton. The new man will face considerable challenges early in his tenure. Sunderland recruited 14 new players during the summer transfer window, several for the first-team squad but others for the development ranks, but the new-look group is yet to gel. Just as important as those who arrived were those who left. Having already lost loan signing Danny Rose following his return to Tottenham, they sold goalkeeper Simon Mignolet to Liverpool and, on deadline day, Stephane Sessegnon to West Brom. It meant they had lost arguably three of their most effective players. Liverpool, Manchester United and Swansea are next up in the league, offering little hope of an immediate turnaround in fortunes. Former Sunderland defender Michael Gray admits he was taken aback by the decision to part company with Di Canio and feels the Italian should have been given longer to try to turn things round. “I’m surprised that Paolo’s lost his job,” Gray told Sky Sports News. “You obviously don’t get time in the Premier League to let the players gel, you’ve got to hit the ground running and obviously they haven’t done that. It’s been a disappointing start but I still think he should have been given a lot more time than he has been.” However, Gray, who played for Sunderland for over a decade up until 2004, also feels that Di Canio did not help himself with his public criticism of players. “I think that when you come in front of the camera and you criticise individual players, it’s something you’ve got to learn from, you can’t do that in this day and age,” he said. “Dressing rooms can be very strong if you’ve got strong characters in there and Sunderland have certainly got that in the likes of John O’Shea, who’s the captain at the club, and when you come out and criticise him publicly that filters through to the rest of the players in the dressing room and I think when you start losing the players it can make it very hard for yourself.” Press Association “You cannot manage in the Premier League these days through a fear factor,” Bruce told talkSPORT. “You’ve got to be able to manage individuals. “Man management has become more relevant in my experience than coaching. “Once you get yourself in the Premier League, they’re all good players and you’ve got to find a way of getting the best out of them. “It’s never been my style to criticise anyone in public and I’m disappointed for Paolo. He’s a character. A manager’s lost his job. Management is a lonely place and he’s lost his job this morning. I feel sorry for any manager in that position. I’ve gone through it and it’s not nice.” Bruce managed Sunderland from 2009 to 2011, taking over after the arrival of current owner Ellis Short, but working under then chairman Niall Quinn. He believes the club’s approach has changed since Quinn left and Short took over as chairman himself. “When I first went there with Niall, everything we did was run through Niall and (Short) was a bit stepped back,” he said. “Since he has become chairman he seems much more hands on now. I’m not privy to too much but when I was there all I did was answer to Niall.” Short’s next task is to find a replacement for the man he appointed in a storm of controversy last year. Former Sunderland manager Steve Bruce believes Paolo Di Canio paid the price for an outdated management style after being ousted by the Black Cats on Sunday night.last_img read more

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Third-time lucky for Lukaku as Everton claim a point against Crystal Palace

first_img The irrepressible Belgium international, the club’s £28million record signing, was not to be denied after twice hitting the frame of the goal prior to Scott Dann’s 76th-minute header giving the visitors the lead. In-form Lukaku made it seven goals in his last six matches nine minutes from time to prove, once again, just how valuable he is to Roberto Martinez’s side. Striker Romelu Lukaku’s 50th goal in his 100th Everton appearance rescued a deserved late point for Everton in a 1-1 draw at home to Crystal Palace. Press Association Liverpool fan Dann thought he had completed a memorable Merseyside double – having scored the winner at Anfield a month ago – when he nodded in from a corner after losing marker Gareth Barry but Lukaku, who also crashed a volley against the crossbar, had the final say with nine minutes to go. TWEET OF THE MATCH “Quick response from #efc. Deulofeu cross, Barry dummied, Lukaku equalised, his 50th goal for #efc in 100th game for club.” The Times’ chief football writer Henry Winter (@henrywinter) sums up an entertaining clash at Goodison Park. PLAYER RATINGS Everton TIM HOWARD: 7/10 SEAMUS COLEMAN: 6 JOHN STONES: 7 RAMIRO FUNES MORI: 6 BRENDAN GALLOWAY: 6 TOM CLEVERLEY: 6 GARETH BARRY: 5 GERARD DEULOFEU: 7 ROSS BARKLEY: 6 AROUNA KONE: 6 ROMELU LUKAKU: 8 Substitutes LEIGHTON BAINES: 6 Crystal Palace WAYNE HENNESSEY: 7 JOEL WARD: 6 SCOTT DANN: 7 DAMIEN DELANEY: 6 PAPE SOARE: 6 MILE JEDINAK: 6 YOHAN CABAYE: 6 JAMES McARTHUR: 7 JASON PUNCHEON: 6 YANNICK BOLASIE: 6 CONNOR WICKHAM: 6 Substitutes: DWIGHT GAYLE: 5 JORDON MUTCH: 6 STAR MAN Romelu Lukaku – The in-form Belgian refused to be denied after twice hitting the frame of the goal and his perseverance was rewarded with a seventh goal in six matches. MOMENT OF THE MATCH Wayne Hennessey’s brilliant flying save to tip over Tom Cleverley’s long-range drive. VIEW FROM THE BENCH Everton manager Roberto Martinez stuck to his guns with his starting XI even when they failed to click in the first hour and his decision to send on left-back Leighton Baines gave them more attacking width. Palace boss Alan Pardew did not make his changes until after they had gone ahead but he cannot be disappointed with a point considering the chances the hosts created. MOAN OF THE MATCH It was Monday night and the match was on television but Palace’s representation was sparse for a side which is supposedly going places. WHO’S UP NEXT? Norwich v Everton (Premier League, Saturday December 12) Crystal Palace v Southampton (Premier League, Saturday December 12) Lukaku played down his personal achievement despite his late equaliser bringing up a half-century of Everton goals in little over two years at the club. The former Chelsea striker is well on the way to beating last year’s tally of 20 goals in all competitions for the Toffees but he insists the team’s ambitions come first. “I’m proud, but as a footballer I’m a team player and I want to win games,” he told Sky Sports. “I’m happy but I’m also disappointed that we didn’t get the three points. “We had a lot of chances and we were unlucky with (hitting the) post and crossbar, and then they scored out of blue, but we did well, (and showed) great character. “As a striker you always have to be focused, you always know that if you have great quality players that you have to be there at the right time and luckily I was there.” Palace thought they should have had a penalty when Barry tugged on Mile Jedinak’s shirt in the second half and the Everton midfielder admits he got away with it. Asked whether he felt fortunate to escape punishment, Barry said: “I think so. He got the run on me and, as you do in the box, I got hold of his shirt and he’s gone down, sometimes they’re given and sometimes they’re not.” Crystal Palace manager Alan Pardew felt a few decisions, including the Barry incident, went against his side but was pleased with a point. He said: “I think it was a fair result. We showed all the quality that we have as a team, and Everton are in top form. “We still almost won and, but for a couple of refereeing decisions which, in my opinion he got wrong, we could have won it. “Sometimes you can win when you perhaps don’t deserve to and that could have happened if those decisions went our way. “I think it was obvious from where I was standing that (Jedinak’s) shirt was being pulled, but the referee and linesman didn’t see it, which I was surprised at.” It was no surprise he benefited from a cross from fellow 21-year-old Gerard Deulofeu as the Catalan had provided five previous assists for his team-mate and is the first person he looks for when he receives the ball out wide. As a result Everton are more direct in the final third this season as Deulofeu’s preference to beat his marker and whip in crosses is matched by his ability to drive at the heart of defences to create a different problem. Everton had scored seven in their last two league matches, Palace five in 90 minutes against Newcastle, but if the watching Wayne Rooney, whose last Premier League goal came against former club Everton in mid-October, was expecting a glut he was disappointed. He cannot fail to have been impressed by Lukaku, however, who has become the focal point of this Everton team with Arouna Kone, the smaller half of a little-and-large combination up front, developing a good understanding with his partner and Ross Barkley also knowing how to get the best out of the Belgian. But for all their probing they drew a blank in the first half, although Lukaku was unlucky not to score his seventh goal in six matches when his shot beat goalkeeper Wayne Hennessey but rebounded off the inside of the far post and flew across the face of goal. But he is not just an out-and-out powerhouse striker and his cushioned lay-off set Deulofeu and Kone racing through for a two on one against Dann only for the former Barcelona graduate’s touch, which had just seen him pull off a drag-back nutmeg through Yohan Cabaye’s legs, let him down. Palace have their own big man up front in Connor Wickham and his near-post header from a corner forced Tim Howard into a point-blank save but the first half was mainly a tale of final touches not coming off as Barkley and Kone both shot into the Park End. Howard’s legs came to the rescue again after the break to deny Yannick Bolasie on the breakaway while Dann’s blushes were spared only by the crossbar as he headed Barkley’s inswinging free-kick past Hennessey, who brilliantly tipped over Tom Cleverley’s drive. last_img read more

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