US judge blocks release of Tennessee man in Capitol riot

first_imgNASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A federal judge has blocked the release of a Tennessee man who authorities say carried flexible plastic handcuffs during the riot at the U.S. Capitol earlier this month. The judge in Washington, D.C., on Sunday set aside a lower court’s order concerning the release of Eric Munchel of Nashville pending a review. The lower court judge determined Friday that Munchel wasn’t a flight risk and didn’t pose harm to the public. Munchel is charged with violent entry and disorderly conduct on the Capitol grounds, conspiracy and civil disorder. He faces up to 20 years if convicted.last_img

READ MORE

Blog considers diversity at ND

first_imgWhen senior Zuri Eshun created the blog “I, Too, Am Notre Dame” for a photography class project, she didn’t know it would grow into a vehicle for conversation about race and culture at the University.One week after the Tumblr page launched, messages on the blog drew students’ and faculty members’ attention to issues of diversity on campus.“It started out as just the [class] project, but once I started reading more about [a similar campaign at Harvard University] and different schools that were doing it, I wanted it to be something … that had some kind of impact on campus,” Eshun said. “So that’s why I then turned it into a project involving a lot of diversity students on campus, rather than just my friends.“I wanted it to be something that was widespread and something that caught attention and something that really brought that sense of where we are with race as a campus to the forefront.”The blog, located at itooamnotredame.tumblr.com, and a Facebook page titled “I, Too, Am Notre Dame” feature photos of students with messages written on their arms, palms or other parts of their bodies. Eshun said those messages are either hurtful statements that other people have said to them or reactions to those statements.“I know that a lot of the [other schools’] campaigns use white boards or a chalkboard or something to write their saying down, and so what I wanted to do to make it unique to Notre Dame was I had them write it on them somewhere, so that it was their experience and that that couldn’t be taken away,” Eshun said.Courtesy of itooamnotredame.tumblr.com/ Eshun said she reached out to students of racial and cultural minorities via email and Facebook to invite them to participate in the project. She said she included students of various minority backgrounds to make the point that “as an entire [minority] group on campus, we are going through this together.”Eshun said she instructed volunteers to make their written messages “whatever is honest to them.”For senior Olevia Boykin, who participated in the project, that message was “Oh, you’ve got it good. You can play that diversity card!”“I’ll be going to law school next year, and that was the most pertinent thing that’s been said to me recently,” Boykin said. “I think a lot of people think I got in because I’m Black or I got to write a diversity statement, but … that’s not why I got in.”Eshun said she thinks the blog scares some people because it suggests that Notre Dame is imperfect.“Being told that something negative has happened, people take it as an offense to them,” she said. “[But] no one is blaming anyone for anything. If this is anything it’s saying there is no blame, there is no anything, there’s only going forward with this.“If you were to take this project, respond to it negatively and move backwards, that would be a problem. But if you see this project and you see what your peers have gone through, you can only go forward with it. You can only have a change in mindset.”Sophomore Kay Kay Fiannaan said she decided to participate in the “I, Too, Am Notre Dame” project because she wanted to encourage people to discuss issues of race and culture on a personal level. She wrote on her palms, “Are you dating [blank]? He is black too!”Fiannaan said she realized that after someone made the comment to her, she had talked about the experience only with her friends who were also minorities.“I thought this would be a good chance to get other people to understand that this has actually been said. This … kind of view that someone has or this idea that someone has, it’s surprising, but it’s out there,” Fiannaan said.Eshun said she has received both positive and negative feedback to the blog.Fiannaan said although she has heard people call the project “attention-seeking” or “unnecessary,” she believes the blog strikes at the heart of issues of diversity at Notre Dame.“Notre Dame is a family, and it’s not perfect. And really working toward that is what matters the most, which is why all these efforts that the administration has been putting in really mean a lot,” Fiannaan said. “However, it’s one thing to be up there in the office and making all these rules and changing different parts of the structure of Notre Dame … but it’s another thing to get to the heart of the issue, which is the students.“And that’s what this project is supposed to do, really to get students talking about this on a very personal level.”Eshun said the blog has recently started to gain momentum.“Where it is now is that it’s starting to kind of be talked about, but what I want it to be is something that you have to go and see or you have to kind of be a part of,” she said. “I want it to be at a point where everyone has seen it and everyone can start that dialogue.”Freshman Manny Caballero, who participated in the blog, said Notre Dame students’ different racial and cultural backgrounds are very apparent.“I think it’s a beautiful thing, but also, at the same time, the [blog] project helps people kind of develop a sense of community and lets them know who we are, where we come from, what we are about,” he said.Eshun said the students featured in the “I, Too, Am Notre Dame” project are shaped by their cultures and backgrounds. She said the project displays parts of these students’ identities and people should acknowledge their messages.“It’s not sympathizing, it’s not being sensitive,” she said. “It’s respecting that person enough to know ‘I see who you are, I see that you’re African-American, I see that you’re Asian or that you’re Hispanic or Latino. I see that, and I’m going to respect you, not only as the person that I know you as, but as the person who is attached to this lineage and this history and this culture.’“And ultimately, when the whole thing is done, that’s what I want.”Tags: blog, Diversitylast_img read more

READ MORE

Internet speeds slow in US, slower in Vermont

first_imgThe United States has an abysmal international ranking in Internet broadband connectivity speeds and Vermont is even worse. While the US is 25th in the world in average connection speeds, Vermont ranks only 45th in the US. Rural areas here and across the country predictably fare worse than urban and suburban regions.The fourth annual speedmatters.org survey reveals an extensive ‘Digital Speed Divide.’ The survey is conducted on behalf of the Communication Workers of America. The trade union represents 700,000 workers in communications, media, airlines, manufacturing, and public service.Its report says that half (49 percent) of US residents’ Internet connections fall below the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) minimum broadband speed standard of 4 megabits per second (mbps) download and 1 mbps upload. This is the minimum speed generally required for using today’s video-rich broadband applications and services, while retaining sufficient capacity for basic web browsing and e-mail.Only 1 percent of US Internet connections meet the FCC’s broadband speed goal for the year 2015 of 50 mbps download and 20 mbps upload.The US has a long way to go to meet the broadband goals set by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in its 2010 National Broadband Plan. The U.S. has made only limited progress in the speeds at which residents connect to the Internet. The median download speed for the nation in 2010 was 3.0 megabits per second (mbps) and the median upload speed was 595 kilobits per second (kbps). (1000 kilobits equal 1 megabit). These speeds are only slightly faster than the 2009 speedmatters.org results of 2.5 mbps download and 487 kbps upload. In other words, between 2009 and 2010, the median download speed increased by only 0.5 mbps (from 2.5 mbps to 3.0 mbps), and the average upload speed barely changed at all (from 487 kbps to 595kbps). At this rate, it will take the United States 60 years to catch up with current Internet speeds in South Korea. Moreover, the median upload speed from the speedmatters.org survey is far too slow for patient monitoring or transmitting large files such as medical records.The US continues to lag far behind other countries. The United States ranks 25th in the world in average Internet connection speeds. In South Korea, the average download speed is 34.1 mbps, or 10 times faster than the U.S. The U.S. trails Sweden at 22.2 mbps, the Netherlands at 20.7 mbps, Japan at 18 mbps, and even Romania at 20.3 mbps. Moreover, people in other countries have access to much faster networks. More than 90 percent of Japanese households have access to fiber-to-the-home networks capable of 100 mbps or greater in both directions.According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the average of advertised speeds offered by broadband providers in Japan was 107.7 mbps and in South Korea was 52.8 mbps. According to the OECD, the United States ranks 24th among industrialized nations in average advertised broadband download speed at 14.6 mbps.Speed makes the promise of the Internet a reality. Too many Americans are locked into slow Internet, foreclosing access to many online applications and services. The FCC minimum broadband standard of 4 mbps downstream and 1 mbps upstream typically delivers enough capacity for video-rich broadband applications and services, while retaining sufficient capacity for basic web browsing and e-mail. But these speeds are not enough to handle advanced applications such as high-definition video streaming. Higher capacity broadband provides enough bandwidth to allow people to send and receive multiple high-definition video channels, large data files, medical diagnostics, or participate in real-time video conferencing. These activities require between 10 and 100 mbps upload and download speed. Fiber-to-the-home networks can deliver at least 100 mbps in both directions.At US median download and upload speeds, it can take half an hour to download, and two-and-one-half hours to upload, an educational video but less than a minute to upload or download on an all-fiber 100 mbps network. Similarly, at US median download and upload speeds, it takes about 13 minutes to download 100 pictures taken on a family vacation and a full hour to upload those same photos. On an all-fiber 100 mbps network, it would take less than 24 seconds to upload or download the full set of pictures.High-speed broadband is the fundamental infrastructure of the 21st century, fueling sustainable economic growth and job creation. It determines whether we will have the 21st century networks we need to create the jobs of the future, develop our economy, and support innovations in telemedicine, education, public safety, energy conservation, and provision of public services to improve our lives and communities. Most U.S. Internet connections are not fast enough in both directions to permit interactive home-based medical monitoring, multi-media distance learning, or to send and receive data to run a home-based business.While the speedmatters.org survey focuses on the slow speeds of U.S. broadband connections, there are other issues that the U.S. must address to realize all the benefits of the Internet. Millions of Americans don’t have high-speed Internet. Nearly 100 million Americans do not have broadband at home. An estimated 14 to 24 million of these people do not even have access to broadband.All too many Americans find themselves on the wrong side of a digital divide based on race, income, geography, and age. While 70 percent of urban and suburban households subscribe to broadband, only 50 percent of rural households do. Similarly, whereas 87 percent of Americans who earn over $75,000 a year get broadband, only 45 percent of households that earn less than $30,000 a year subscribe. Only about 67 percent of middle-income families earning between $30,000 and $50,000 a year subscribe to broadband. Among non-adopters, one-fifth (21 percent) report that broadband access or a computer is too expensive and another one-fifth (18 percent) say they don’t know how to use the technology.The United States has fallen to 15th in the world in broadband adoption. Countries like South Korea, Japan, Sweden and even Romania have much faster Internet connections than we do. People in Japan can upload a high-definition video in 12 minutes, compared to a grueling 2.5 hours at the U.S. median upload speed. Yet, people in Japan pay about the same as we do in the U.S. for their Internet connection.In March, 2010, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) released its National Broadband Plan. The Plan provides a blueprint to address our nation’s broadband challenges. Congress, the FCC, and other state and federal agencies, working with the private sector, must move forward expeditiously to implement these priority items.The National Broadband Plan estimates that it will cost about $24 billion to provide the subsidies needed to build out broadband networks capable of 4 mbps download and 1 mbps upload to the largely rural areas that currently do not have access to broadband. According to FCC estimates, it will cost $350 billion to build truly high-speed networks capable of 100 mbps to every corner of our nation. Today, universal services subsidies support voice telephony. It is long past time to reform our universal service program to support affordable, high-speed Internet for all. The existing universal service Lifeline and Link-Up programs of subsidies to low-income families for telephone service should be expanded to include subsidy programs for Internet access and equipment, such as computers. The highly successful E-Rate program of subsidies to schools, libraries, and rural health centers provides a model to expand bandwidth capacity to these community anchor institutions.Source: www.speedmatters.org(link is external) 12.20.2010last_img read more

READ MORE

Vermont files US Supreme Court brief in support of constitutionality of health care reform

first_imgAttorney General William H Sorrell has filed a friend-of-the-court brief in the US Supreme Court supporting the constitutionality of federal health care reform and urging the high court to uphold the landmark law.‘Vermont has a very real interest in seeing the Affordable Care Act upheld by the Supreme Court. Although some perceive the Act as an example of the federal government imposing its will on the States, it actually gives the States much flexibility in the provision of quality health care for all. The Act is a prime example of federalism at work,’ said Attorney General Sorrell.In August 2011, a divided United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit ruled that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act’s minimum coverage provision, which requires that individuals maintain adequate health insurance, is unconstitutional. The United States government appealed that decision to the U.S. Supreme Court, which will hear oral arguments in the matter in March 2012.This past Friday, Vermont joined several other states in filing a brief that urges the Supreme Court to uphold the Act. The brief stresses that health care is a major part of the national economy, and that the federal government already plays a critical role in paying for and providing health care. The Act is both a constitutional exercise of Congress’s broad powers to regulate interstate commerce and an indispensable aid to the states in their own efforts to tackle the health care problems their residents face.Also joining Vermont in this brief are California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, the District of Columbia, and the Virgin Islands.A copy of the brief may be found by clicking here. Source: Vermont Attorney General, January 17, 2012last_img read more

READ MORE

Roadside Confessions: Adaptation

first_imgThe newness of living on the road has finally worn off. That little inkling of a former time with plush beds and toasters and air conditioning has been pushed from even the deepest corners of my memory.This is my life now.My home has a different address every week. My office, a different desk. I often get bug bites while making breakfast, sunburn while preparing lunch. “Getting ready for bed,” has a different meaning now, one that involves a level and an upper body workout. But it’s becoming less foreign to me, less of a pain-in-the-ass. It’s just life now. It is what it is. Sometimes I find myself at a hole-in-the-wall restaurant in a town I don’t know, eating a meal by myself for the upteenth time. Other times I’m back in the “real world,” whatever that is, catching up with old friends and making pasta e fagioli in a real kitchen (thank you Rachel!). Wherever I am, whatever it is I’m doing, no matter how crazy or hectic or unnerving, I’m starting to feel the comfort in it all, in knowing that each and every minute of every day is different, unpredictable, and completely up to me. So what if it takes me three times as long to brush my teeth and cook my meals? Slowly, surely, I’m learning the art of adaptation.I finally took a day to “chill,” as it were, earlier this week. My idea of chilling was, in effect, just another day of getting dialed in. I emptied the Jeep and Go entirely. Everything I owned was spread out in my friend’s front yard, down to the contents of every last pocket on my Deuter packs. I never found that headlamp I misplaced the night I moved out of my apartment, but I did find a number of other items that made me realize something: it’s time for another confessional.1. I can’t ever stay dry. Ever.Whether it’s rain, condensation in the Go, humidity in the air, sweat on my pits, everything is damp. Always. Welcome to the Southeast.2. I feel old in the morning.I’m not kidding. It takes me a couple hours just to feel like I wasn’t hit by a train the night before. If I’m out of coffee or fuel to make coffee, back off.3. Strangers see my bedroom everyday.That’ll never stop being weird.4. I miss blenders.And raw vegetables. I spent $11 the other day on a gigantic salad that had just about every vegetable in the book. And it was totally worth it.5. Showers do nothing for me.I never fail to miss a mud splatter on my ankle, behind the knee, across my forehead, or any of those other, you know, “hard to reach” places…6. Cotton shirts are under-appreciated.Spend the next three weeks in damp synthetic, head-to-toe. You’ll know what I mean.7. I only did laundry twice in the month of May.And yes, I’m sorta bragging.8. My definition of “clean” changes on the hour.Every hour.9. Cleaning the Jeep is like finding a pot of gold.In this week’s winnings, a month-old banana, moldy avocado skins, and a petrified pile of stink bugs. Wealth is in the eye of the beholder.10. Sometimes my desk isn’t so much a desk as it is a trunk.Or the floor. The top of my backpack. Maybe a washing machine at the laundromat. I’m flexible.last_img read more

READ MORE

More funding and new judges are on the way

first_img More funding and new judges are on the way More funding and new judges are on the way Florida courts appeared headed for increased funding while the number of new judges for next year remained in limbo as the Florida Legislature wound down its work for the 2005 legislative session.The legislature was scheduled to end its work on May 6, as this News went to press.Although budget approval had been reached on May 3, under state law final action couldn’t come until 72 hours later, or mid-afternoon May 6.In the meantime other issues were still pending, which included the number of new judges to be approved (which was being handled independently of the budget) and the Art. V, Revision 7 glitch bill. Others of concern to the legal profession appeared unlikely to pass, including a lawyer advertising bill, regulation of paralegals, and challenges to the Supreme Court’s rulemaking authority.The Supreme Court had certified the need for 110 new judges for the 2005-06 fiscal year. The House of Representatives, under the leadership of House Fiscal Council Chair Joe Negron, R-Stuart, and Rep. Bruce Kyle, R-Ft. Myers, approved a bill creating 108 new judgeships. That gave the court all of the county and circuit judges it sought, but neither of the two district court of appeal judges.The Senate responded by offering 34 judgeships, but leaders there said they remained committed to approving at least half of the certified positions this year and the remainder next year.The final bill appeared to be adopting that approach, according to State Courts Administrator Lisa Goodner, calling for 35 new circuit judges and 20 new county judges, all to be appointed by Gov. Jeb Bush. Where those judgeships would be created was still being determined as this News went to press.Senators said they wanted to approve the remaining 55 judges next year.The Art. V, Revision 7, glitch bill was moving, clearing the House 115-1 on the morning of May 5. The main issue of interest to the Bar and courts, concerning judicial oversight of clerk functions that support the courts, had been worked out. That gave judges, working in cooperation with clerks, oversight of those operations that support the courts. It also required clerks to give a year’s notice if they wanted to cut those functions, to give the courts time to seek replacement funding from the legislature.On other issues, the agreed upon budget is beneficial for the court system, Goodner said, giving it most of what was requested.Highlights include:• The Supreme Court got $4 million of its requested $5.8 million for maintenance and renovations. Goodner said the court will put off a planned $1 million of its courtroom renovations and address other needs of the building.• The legislature approved 10 of the 13 new positions Goodner requested to continue dealing with the Art. V, Revision 7, changes that saw the state take over more funding from the counties for the trial court system. Lawmakers also approved new positions for the Supreme Court’s Inspector General and security operations.• “The district courts of appeal had a number of maintenance and repair issues, all of which were funded,” Goodner said. “The Second and Fifth DCAs had additonal workload positions which were funded.”• “In the trial courts, we were able to get a fair amount of additional funding for court reporting,” Goodner said. “We’re looking at some substantial revamping of court reporting services across the state to make it more efficient.”• Some Art. V, Revision 7, issues were not funded, Goodner said, such as improving mediation services around the state.• The courts lapse funding wasn’t fully addressed, which will leave it short of salary dollars again. “We just have to kind of continue to buckle down and make it stretch,” Goodner said.• The state’s judges will get the 3.6 percent pay raise given to all state employees, and county court judges will get an additional $5,000 to bring their salary more in line with what circuit court judges make. Goodner said the court system has been seeking a fixed relationship between the salaries at the different levels of the state court system, and the $5,000 boost is in response to that.• Supreme Court employees will get an additional pay raise, Goodner said, in recognition that pay there has lagged behind other public and private agencies.On other issues, efforts to amend the Supreme Court’s procedural rulemaking died in committee. HJR 1007, by Rep. Dick Kravitz, R-Orange Park, originally would have created a judicial conference to propose criminal rules of procedure, similar to the process used to create procedural rules in the federal courts — except the legislature would appoint members of the panel instead of the Supreme Court. But the bill was ultimately amended to have the Supreme Court continuing to adopt procedural rules, but amends the constitution to give the legislature the power to overturn those rules by a simple majority of each chamber, instead of the current two-thirds vote of the membership. The measure also held that nothing in the constitution “shall be construed to restrict or limit the power of the legislature to enact laws relating to substantive or procedural matters.” The resolution also says the courts may not regulate any aspect of collateral or postconviction judicial review of a criminal judgment or sentence, except as authorized by general law, and that no procedural rule shall be inconsistent with general law or modify any substantive right. While the measure was set for a vote a number of times, a definitive vote on the issue was never held.The Senate did pass SB 192 on lawyer advertising, but the bill was never considered in the House. In its final version, the bill required all lawyers, including out-of-state lawyers advertising in Florida, to file an affidavit with the Bar saying they have read and understand the Bar’s advertising rules, and that their ad conforms to those rule. That affidavit, if submitted by a multi-lawyer firm, must be signed by a lawyer who is responsible for the ad and can be disciplined if the ad is found in violation of Bar rules.The law would also impose a civil fine of $1,000 for the first offense and $10,000 for any succeeding offense.Bills introduced in the House and Senate to regulate paralegals died without being heard in any committee in either the House or Senate, but the issue may come back.Sen. Nancy Argenziano, R-Crystal River, Sen. Alex Villalobos, R-Miami, Rep. Juan Zapata, R-Miami, and Rep. Joe Negron, R-Stuart, sent a letter to the Bar urging them to reach an agreement with the Florida Alliance of Paralegal Associations on paralegal regulation. They said the bills would be reintroduced next session and taken up early in committee meetings if there is no action.“Our strong desire is for the parties to negotiate a meaningful, viable result that will effectively regulate the paralegal profession in Florida prior to September 1, 2005; however, if the parties are unable to reach satisfactory agreement by that date, let us assure each of you that your support and sponsoring of this bill remains and the bill will be promptly scheduled for hearing in the first set of committee hearings for the 2006 legislative session,” the letter said.The legislators noted in the letter that the Bar had objections to the bills, which were filed at the behest of FAPA, but that the parties indicated they could work out an agreement.center_img May 15, 2005 Regular Newslast_img read more

READ MORE

Haber Pitches LI Host 10-day Summer Sports Festival

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Adam Haber has been going door to door to increase his name recognition in the Democratic primary for the Nassau County executive’s race (Spencer Rumsey).Trying to score a $5-million prize for Long Island—and perhaps show that he can think outside the box—Adam Haber, who’s running in the Democratic primary for Nassau County executive against former incumbent Tom Suozzi, is proposing that Nassau and Suffolk join together to host a 10-day “Summer Festival.”The fest would feature athletic competitions in cycling, golfing, beach volleyball and cricket as well as specialty food, entertainment and tours of the North Fork wineries and the North Shore Gold Coast mansions. Haber, the retired Wall Street trader, restaurant owner and Roslyn School Board member, hopes that his proposal—whose details still need to be ironed out—could help LI walk away with Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s top prize for the best idea in a regional tourism competition.“I believe Nassau and Suffolk are perfectly situated to work together to win this prize money,” said Haber, who hopes to win the Democratic Party line to challenge Republican County Executive Ed Mangano in November. “We’ve got natural resources that are underutilized. That’s how I look at it.”Haber’s idea is to host this event around the July Fourth weekend, “which is a good travel weekend,” he noted, and involve venues across the Island. He’d schedule it when basketball and hockey seasons are over and football has yet to begin so the sporting contests would get a good shot at being broadcast live. He says that sponsorships, entry fees and television rights would help offset the costs of running the events and provide cash prizes for the winners.As Haber sees it, the festival would draw “top amateur talent” from across the nation to participate in events ranging from a lacrosse tournament with finals at Mitchell Field, a three-stage bicycle race, a bi-county marathon, a fast-pitch softball series, and an Iron Man Triathlon, to an amateur golf tournament capped by a championship round at Beth Page Black.“I want to create a tournament where we give a million-dollar prize in several different sports,” he told the Press, citing the loss of the Islanders hockey team as creating a vacuum that this sports festival could fill, thereby creating a new identity for our region. The earliest he could see it happening would be 2015.For a precedent, he pointed out that the Oyster Festival in Oyster Bay started about 20 years ago with 20,000 people attending and grew into a three-day event drawing more than 100,000 people, becoming one of LI’s largest annual events. Tourists, Haber pointed out, spend money, which translates into sales taxes that can pour directly into the counties’ coffers.Currently, the task of promoting our region’s assets is the primary responsibility of the Long Island Convention and Visitors Bureau and Sports Commission, which reportedly received about $764,000 from Nassau and $1.9 million from Suffolk in its 2013 budget and spent some $1,700,000 on marketing and sales.According to Smith Travel Research, the Island gained $4.8 billion in travel spending in 2011, the most recent figures available from the bureau, although anecdotal reports suggest LI tourism is down slightly this summer after Sandy.Haber declined to criticize the bureau’s activities, but he did tell the Press that he thinks “it’s really not reaching its full potential.” He would like to see a fully integrated, Island-wide focus and believes that a 10-day event in July could put the Island on the map.“This sports festival, if done properly, would be a phenomenal way to get this region moving again,” he said.last_img read more

READ MORE

Moderna, Revolve, Fossil & more

first_imgHere’s a look at the companies making headlines in after-hours trading.Moderna — The biotech stock rose 2% after Moderna said that it has had enough cases of Covid-19 in its vaccine candidate trial to take a look at the data, signaling that preliminary results could be released soon. The stock also rose more than 8% during normal trading hours Wednesday.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – – Advertisement –center_img Revolve Group — Shares of the fashion retailer fell more than 9% after the company reported a surprise year-over-year decline in net sales for the third quarter. Revolve reported $151 million in net sales for the three-month period, below the $154.2 million from the same quarter last year. The company said Covid-19 has continued to hurt performance during the early weeks of the fourth quarter.Fossil Group — Shares of the watchmaker spiked more than 30% after Fossil announced its third-quarter results that included widening margins. The company said it earned an adjusted 31 cents per share on $435.5 million of net sales during the quarter, which was a decline in net sales of 19% year over year. Fossil also said it had more than $300 million in cash and cash equivalents as of Oct. 3.Vroom — The online auto retailer’s stock fell about 10% despite Vroom reporting a smaller-than-expected loss for its third quarter. Vroom said it lost an adjusted 29 cents per share, compared with an expected loss of 36 cents per share from analysts surveyed by FactSet. The company said that consumer demand has returned to pre-pandemic levels, but its fourth-quarter guidance for loss per share was between 41 cents and 35 cents. Analysts surveyed by FactSet had penciled in 35 cents.last_img read more

READ MORE

Typhoon Haishen brings high winds, power outages to Japan

first_img“I am urging everyone to take the utmost caution, follow local authorities’ instructions and protect your own life. Once you enter an area of high wind, you may not be able to move to a safer place.”The typhoon is forecast to have atmospheric pressure of 935 hectopascals at its centre, and sustained winds of up to 234 km (145 miles) per hour by Monday, the meteorological agency said.The typhoon’s centre was near Yakushima, an island around 100 km (60 miles) south of Kagoshima city, on Sunday, moving northwest at 30 kph (20 mph).The typhoon was forecast to approach the Goto Islands west of Nagasaki around midnight and then move to the Korean peninsula on Monday, according to Japan’s meteorological agency.High waves lashed the southwestern coast of Kagoshima and high winds rattled street signs, NHK video showed.Airlines have cancelled more than 500 flights departing from Okinawa and southern Japan, NHK said.Japan’s coastguard on Saturday suspended its search for crew missing from a cattle ship that capsized in the East China Sea for a second day because of the typhoon.Typhoon Haishen follows Typhoon Maysak, which smashed into the Korean peninsula on Thursday, leaving at least two dead and thousands temporarily without power.Topics : Typhoon Haishen drew closer to Japan’s southern mainland on Sunday, prompting authorities to recommend evacuation and warn of potentially record rainfall, unprecedented wind, high tides and large ocean swells.Authorities urged early evacuation for more than 100,000 households in the southern prefectures of Okinawa, Kagoshima, Kumamoto, and Nagasaki, according to the Fire and Disaster Management Agency (FDMA).Prime Minister Shinzo Abe with relevant cabinet ministers at 4 p.m. (0700 GMT) to discuss the emergency response to the typhoon, his office said. Elderly citizens wearing face masks due to the coronavirus outbreak were slowly gathering at evacuation centres in Kagoshima and other parts of southern Japan, footage on national broadcaster NHK showed.The typhoon has cut power to more than 3,000 homes in Okinawa, the southernmost island prefecture, and more than 8,000 homes in Amamioshima, according to national broadcaster NHK.Two injuries have been reported, according to the FDMA, but authorities were advising the highest levels of caution for a typhoon.”Areas where the typhoon passes are expected to see record high winds and waves,” a meteorological official told a nationally televised news conference on Sunday.last_img read more

READ MORE

Quintessential Queensland oasis

first_imgThe kitchen has an island bench.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:44Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:44 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p288p288p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow to bid at auction for your dream home? 01:45 The house at 11 Meridian St, Coorparoo, is for sale.IT WAS not a big deal for Kylie and Scott Southwood to jump sides of the river when they moved to Coorparoo nearly 14 years ago. The bedroom has funky wallpaper.The 11 Meridian St house turned out to be perfect, and it grew with them as their family did.“We’ve grown, put in a pool and have redone the backyard to suit growing children,” Mrs Southwood said.“We adapted the house and renovated underneath to add extra spaces for guests or grandparents.” One of the home’s living areas.Mrs Southwood said the family would miss living in the home.“The house has been a haven for our family.“We created an oasis to escape a busy life.“It has fulfilled that and when we retreat in here, we feel like we’re somewhere else.” The dining room flows out to the deck.More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020Mrs Southwood said the living space they had created on the bottom floor, which consists of a bedroom with an ensuite and a media room, had been perfect for her family, especially once her twin sons became teenagers.“The house was great for those early days and even now because we’ve got downstairs, we’ve got room for teenagers to retreat,” she said.“The house has really allowed us to have multiple areas to gather, but not be in each others’ faces.” The deck is Mrs Southwood’s favourite space in the house.Upstairs, however, was where Mrs Southwood’s favourite space in the house was.“We have a kitchen and dining leading out to a deck, and it is just surrounded by greenery,” Mrs Southwood said.“It’s very private and lush, and it’s so rare to have trees around nowadays.“I love it.” Relax by the pool.They came from the north side, and they were happy to live wherever, as long as it was close to the city and had enough room for two cots in the same bedroom, as they were expecting twins.last_img read more

READ MORE