Silva, UE planning for possibility of Pasaol joining PBA Draft

first_imgCarpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award MOST READ Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Naascu player passes away a week after shooting Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal LATEST STORIEScenter_img Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “Alvin and I still have to talk, and also with the management, because he might enter this year’s PBA Draft,” said Silva in Filipino.Pasaol still has two more years of collegiate eligibility after Season 81 but with the way he’s playing he’s already seen as a viable lottery pick in the PBA.“We’re going to talk to him and whatever he wants that’s what we’ll go with,” said Silva.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew A multi-titled coach with Ateneo in the juniors’ division, Silva’s early stay in the UAAP Season 81 men’s basketball tournament produced just one win against 10 losses.Despite the miserable record, though, Silva has a silver lining in the talented forward Alvin Pasaol.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissPasaol has been a consistent 20-10 player in the league at this point of the season with 22.1 points and 10.7 rebounds-per-game but Silva knows those numbers could come to an end with UE.Silva is aware that Pasaol’s draft stock continues to rise with every game he plays in the UAAP and the idea of his player getting drafted is already in the back of his mind. Joe Silva’s first year as a head coach in the collegiate ranks has been bittersweet at best.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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Wildlife Commission outlines closed hunting seasons for 2020

first_img…including birds, reptiles, mammalsThe Guyana Wildlife Conservation and Management Commission has published a list of dates for 2020, when wildlife hunting, trapping and killing will be prohibited.For birds, the closed season for parrots and macaws will be from January to May and throughout December; followed by ducks between April to September; ibises from January to August; and black curassow from January to June and in December.Scarlet IbisesAs it relates to mammals, any endangerment of kinkajous will be illegal from April to October; followed by the two-toed sloth in April to December; the lesser anteater from October to December and January to February.For January, February, October and December, interference with the pygmy anteater and tree porcupine are also prohibited. Meanwhile, from May to December, persons were advised that the nine-banded armadillo and Kappler’s armadillo will be illegal.For January to June and in December, hunting is closed for the six-banded armadillo; with the red brocket deer, squirrel monkey and white-tailed deer from January to April and September to December.Closed season for capuchins is from May to December; and the tapir from January to May and September to December.There are restrictions set aside for reptiles as well, including the closed season for green iguanas from May to July and red-footed tortoise from April to July.Any interference with these animals during the outlined seasons are not allowed. During the periods, there will be no trapping, hunting, wounding, killing or sale.Wildlife trafficking is a criminal enterprise that reaps profits in the billions of dollars and is widely known to cause challenges in security and also cause instability in a country’s economy. There are regulations for penalties for harvesting prohibited species of wildlife, exporting, re-exporting or importing wildlife without permits and the use of prohibited devices and methods to hunt wildlife.The Commission is tasked with the responsibility of granting, amending and cancelling licences and permits relating to wildlife. Adding to that, it is responsible for determining the closed season for the capturing and trade of wildlife species.The wildlife Act provides for the establishment of a Wildlife Import and Export Authority, which will be tasked with the management of the international trade of wildlife in Guyana.last_img read more

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Huskies looking to end skid tonight against Beaverlodge

first_imgIt’s been a struggle to say the least for the Blades this season. Not only are they 0-10 up to this point but they’ve scored only 28 goals against a staggering 87 goals against.Tonight’s game is the only one for the Huskies this weekend. After tonight’s game the team will be off until next Friday when they’ll be in Fairview. That will be followed by a home game next Saturday against Sexsmith at 8 p.m.- Advertisement –last_img

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Huskies fall apart in Slave Lake

first_imgBy Jon Zacks After a strong performance on Friday against Peace River, the pups got off to an excellent start on Saturday, firing four goals past William Causey for a 4-0 lead after 20 minutes. The Huskies laid an egg on Saturday night, losing 6-4 in Slave Lake. “We came out flat, the reffing was … reffing in Slave Lake … and it just carried over to the third” said Huskies Assistant Coach Jeremy Clother of the collapse.   With the game tied 4-4 heading into the third, the Huskies were still in the game, but they were unable to regain momentum. With Payden Wongstedt in the stands (with a minor muscle injury) and Garrett Muir pulling himself after the fourth Wolves goal, the Huskies seemed unable to get back on their front feet, or regain the intensity they’d played with over the past few games. But, the wheels fell off in the second period, and the Wolves fought their way back in it. center_img Dylan Apsassin and Steven Fast both found the back of the net, while Cody Hildebrand scored twice. Nick Plourde beat Garrett Muir 8 minutes into the second, to get Slave Lake on the board. Kyle Pichette soon got in on the act, scoring twice, and assisting on a Dustin Ghostkeeper goal. Three minutes into the third, Justin Spees banged a rebound past Ty Gullickson, to give the Wolves the lead. Halfway through the third, Thomas Garon added an insurance marker, though it was insurance the Wolves wouldn’t need. “With our team, we should win” said Clothier. “We have the talent to do it, we have the goaltending to keep us in games … but tonight we just didn’t find ways to score in the third.” Fortunately for the Huskies, they don’t have long to stew on the loss. On Sunday afternoon, they get back on the ice at the Arctic Ice Centre, looking for some revenge on the Wolves. Catch Sunday’s game live on Moose FM, starting at 2 p.m.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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Ministry says groups consulted about water licence

first_imgHe also says a second water licence for Cambrian Energy is expected to be approved by the end of the week. Despite criticisms from Cariboo North MLA Bob Simpson that two water pipelines were approved without public or First Nations consultations, the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations says it acted according to provincial policy.Simpson was critical of the fact that so much water is used for hydraulic fracking.- Advertisement -In a statement provided by the Ministry, it says it approved a licence for Talisman Energy that allows the company to remove up to 10,000 cubic metres of water per day from the Williston Reservoir to a maximum of 3.65 million cubic metres a year. It says an environmental assessment is only done if a company asks to extract more than 10 million cubic metres a year.The Ministry says it consulted with First Nations in March and April, as well as stakeholders and local and federal governments and determined the reservoir could handle the requested amount of water.The company must also install an approved flow monitoring device and keep records of how much water it has extracted.Simpson has been critical of fracking and is calling on the Province to specify a price for water used by the natural gas industry, to encourage a reduction in demand on freshwater resources.Advertisementlast_img read more

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P.R. concern won’t pay for Dowie defense

first_imgThe former Fleishman-Hillard executive who won millions of dollars in city contracts while providing free political advice to Mayor James Hahn’s administration has lost his bid to have the public relations firm pay legal fees related to his federal indictment for fraud mainly over work for the Department of Water and Power. The Jan. 11 decision grants Fleishman-Hillard’s motion to dismiss Doug Dowie’s civil lawsuit demanding the company pay his defense costs. But U.S. District Judge Gary Allen Feess said Dowie could revive his suit if he is acquitted of charges that he bilked the DWP out of at least $300,000 over a four-year period. Dowie has pleaded not guilty. Dowie’s civil attorney, Michael J. Faber, said he didn’t know how much Dowie has racked up in legal bills with Gibson Dunn & Crutcher, but said those defense lawyers are continuing to “vigorously” represent him. Faber said Dowie can seek reimbursement of the legal fees later, regardless of the outcome of the criminal trial. Feess’ ruling doesn’t affect the wrongful termination suit that Dowie has filed against Fleishman Hillard, which is scheduled for trial in June. He’s seeking lost wages from his $370,000-a-year job and other damages, alleging he was made a “scapegoat” for the public relations company as it was being swept up in a City Hall corruption scandal. Fleishman-Hillard paid the city nearly $6 million to settle a lawsuit over the alleged overbilling, distanced itself from possible criminal wrongdoing in the case, and said it would fully cooperate in the investigation. The firm issued a statement saying it was satisfied with the court’s decision and would have no further comment. John Stodder, who also was fired by the P.R. giant, was indicted on 11 counts of wire fraud and a conspiracy charge. He also has pleaded not guilty. Former Fleishman-Hillard executive Steve Sugarman pleaded guilty to three counts of wire fraud in July, admitting he bilked the DWP out of tens of thousands of dollars and agreeing to cooperate with prosecutors against other former company officials. Beth Barrett, (818) 713-3731 beth.barrett@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Martinez confident Vipers will reach Champions League Group stage

first_imgJavier Martinez (left) and Viper’s defender Geoffrey Wasswa (right) during the Pre-match press conference on Friday (Photo by Shaban Lubega)CAF Champions League-First round 2nd LegVipers SC vs CS ConstantineSt. Mary’s Stadium, KitendeSaturday, 22-12-2018 @4pmKITENDE – With just over a day to their return leg clash at the home to CS Constantine, Vipers SC head coach Javier Martinez is optimistic his side will reach the lucrative end (Group stages) of the tournament.Vipers head into Saturday’s game trailing 1-0 from the first leg and know a 2-0 result will be enough to see them reach the Group stages of the competition for the first time in history.“Tomorrow (Saturday) we have a very important game, we are still preparing and are excited about it, said Martinez at the Pre-Match press briefing in Kitende.“We know what is at stake and it is either victory or we are out. We want to do the best and i am confident we will progress.The Mexican has been in charge of Vipers for over 4 months now and oversaw the Venom’s elimination of Sudanese side Al Merriekh in the last round. Viper won the second leg 1-0 after losing 2-1 in Sudan.Martinez has been in charge of Vipers for 4 monthsHowever, the game on Saturday poses a stiffer challenge than that in the last round after Vipers failed to score away from home.“We know it is not going to be easy, continued Martinez.“We have the opportunity to change the result and that is because we did great away from home.  We come into the game after defeating Bul 3-1 on Wednesday and that will help boost our spirits because it is always good to head into such a game on the back of a victory.“Hopefully, we can be replicate the result and performance in Jinja.Vipers have been troubled by injuries of late especially in the goalkeeping department and have seen third choice-Derrick Ochan start both of their last two games but Martinez is not worried about that department going into Saturday’s clash.“I am not worried about my goalkeeping department because we have three good goalkeepers.“I am confident that whoever starts against Constantine will get the job done. Ochan (Derrick) is supposed to be third choice but has been doing well of late and he is someone we all trust very much.Asked about injury updates and why Aggrey Madoi has not been featuring of late, the Mexican had this to say.“Our Captain Tadeo Lwanga is still injured but we will wait and see if he comes back in time for the game. Apart from him, the rest of the team is in contention.“About Madoi, he was injured before but now he is coming back.“We have 29 players who compete for places so it is not easy just easing back into the set up but he is now available and we will wait and see if he makes the team tomorrow.Comments Tags: CAF Champions League 2018/19CS ConstantineJavier martinezvipers sclast_img read more

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UN funding for African ‘green’ projects

first_img8 March 2010The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has partnered with South Africa’s Standard Bank and the German government’s International Climate Initiative to develop a new carbon project as part of the fight against climate change.The Africa Carbon Asset Development (ACAD) is the first facility dedicated to boosting the African carbon market, and will support continental projects through a combination of technical assistance, grants and preferential access to corporate finance and transactional guidance.ACAD takes a new approach toward capacity and market development, sharing costs and risks with African banks such as Standard Bank to realise and replicate projects.“Huge investments, especially in Africa, will be needed if we are to minimize the effects of climate change,” Sylvie Lemmet, director of UNEP’s Paris-based Division of Technology, Industry and Economics, said in a statement last week.“Government investment alone will not be enough. ACAD is a good example of how we can attract much-needed private capital for investments that address climate change.”Removing investment barriersOne of the key challenges Africa faces is in removing investment barriers to low-carbon sustainable development. Combined with traditional debt or equity finance, carbon finance is a promising means of attracting funding for energy and infrastructure projects; and it is here that ACAD can help.The ACAD partnership couples UNEP’s longstanding capacity building expertise in environmental policy and finance with the financial know-how and regional reach of Standard Bank.“We are keen to bring our global experience on carbon finance back to our roots in Africa and to combine it with the leading technical expertise of UNEP and its Risoe Center,” said Standard Bank Carbon Sales and Trading head Geoff Sinclair.“Our objective is to collaborate with local companies and investors to bring Africa to the forefront of the carbon markets and we look forward to working with everyone to achieve this.”‘Green’ development projectsACAD has recently awarded its first grants to innovative “green” development projects in Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa. These include:The Lake Turkana Wind Power Project in Kenya, one of the largest renewable energy generation projects on the African continent to have achieved financial closure. ACAD will provide partial payment for validation costs under the Clean Development Mechanism – the UN carbon credit scheme;The Lagos Waste Management Authority in Nigeria which is developing several waste-to-energy sites. ACAD is supporting the costs of engineering and carbon auditing studies required to earn carbon credits; andThe Athi River Mining (ARM) Company, which operates a cement plant in Kenya and is attempting to reduce coal consumption in a cement plant by using locally available biomass resources.“As we are continuously working to improve our environmental footprint, Athi River Mining appreciates the technical and financial support provided by the new ACAD Facility to get this project off the ground,” said ARM managing director Pradeep Paunrana.“We will look to the lessons of this project for further energy and cost savings across the company.”SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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High five for South African film in Toronto

first_imgThe universal theme of redemption and the beloved tropes of the western genre – and the great film-making – bring acclaim to Five Fingers for Marseilles.Vuyo Dabula stars as Tau, who finds redemption on his return to Marseilles. (Image: Graham Bartholomew/ Be Phat Motel)Sulaiman PhilipA new South African film, seven years in the making, has premiered at the Toronto Film Festival to great acclaim. The festival runs from 7-17 September. Five Fingers for Marseilles uses the familiar format of a western to tell the story of one man’s redemption after a life of violence.Local film fans will recognise familiar faces such as Vuyo Dabula, Kenneth Nkosi and Jerry Mofokeng once the film gets a wider local release. Shot and set in the Eastern Cape, the isiXhosa and Sesotho film has been receiving rave reviews since its Toronto premiere.Generations: The Legacy actor Dabula stars as Tau, the leader of a group of five close friends growing up in rural Marseilles. As teenagers living in apartheid-era South Africa, they challenge corrupt police officials hoping to create a better life for themselves and their community.During their escapades Tau kills two policemen and is forced to flee. Arrested and convicted, he is imprisoned in Johannesburg. Twenty years later he returns to Marseilles to find a town under siege, and his community living in fear of the Night Runners, a gang led by the fearsome, villainous Ghost.An African westernThe official trailer of Five Fingers for Marseilles firmly sets up the South African film as a western. It uses familiar imagery – a remote town, the mysterious stranger walking down dusty streets and long, trailing shots of the mountains of the Eastern Cape – to tell a story of redemption and the liberation that comes from accepting the consequences of your actions.First time director Michael Matthews and screenwriter Sean Drummond spent seven years researching and developing the film. This included travelling across the country scouting locations. Driving through the Eastern Cape they were reminded of the mythic widescreen panoramic vistas of director John Fords in westerns such as The Searchers and Stagecoach.Speaking at an event in Toronto, where his film has been called complex, daring and ambitious, Drummond said that making a western allowed him and his partner to explore themes that mattered in the South African context. Good westerns, he said, “always had socio-political undercurrents running through them. By putting a highly entertaining, contemporary spin on this South African western, the film explores subjects that resonate right now with many people.”Matthews explained in an interview with American entertainment magazine Variety: “Personally I think it’s good to explore topics that have relevance to the lives of South African audiences, but the trick is to do it subtly through plot and character, not to mistake ‘issue’ for storytelling. Story is king. And also, a lot of these issues are relevant all over, so themes can be universal.”Dusk settles over the Marseilles set,Khwezi Naledi township. (Image: Graham Bartholomew/ Be Phat Motel)Challenges creating great South African filmIn the interview with Variety, Matthews said South African filmmakers were more than capable of making interesting and entertaining films. The challenge had always been, he said, finding financing. However, filmmakers needed to make movies that made the industry appealing to private investors. “If we want to make films that are bigger, that’s more money. You hear grumbles about funding, and of course movie-money is hard to find, but with the (Department of Trade and Industry) rebate, etc, here we have a lot going for us.”While locally made productions, and Matthews included a hit such as Neil Blomkamp’s District 9, did create a buzz, the audience for local productions remained small and mostly urban. The recently released Kalushi, about Solomon Mahlangu, was an example. Director Mandla Dube’s film was considered a commercial failure because it was shown mostly on screens close to formerly white neighbourhoods.“A priority is building up local audiences – so attracting people that might not usually watch films, as well as offering films that compete with the international stuff coming in and drawing audiences towards local content rather than the imports.”The changing business model for movie production did offer some hope, Matthews said. Video on Demand services would increase the size of audiences for locally made films that could be streamed into homes or on to computers.To make products for that market would require a serious look at how films were financed. Matthews said the next funding challenge was to “source finance that’s altruistic and dedicated to expression and culture, maybe something more along European models”.For a director who made his name making commercials, Matthews is a fan of the big screen experience. He believes that his film is best experienced in a theatre. “It’s the experience as much as the films themselves and some films will always warrant that. I think you experience film in a different way in a cinema space and that applies to even the tiny indie drama. It draws you in, in a different way; it’s an all-encompassing different kind of a magic.”Marseilles is under siege by the Night Runners gang. (Image: Graham Bartholomew/ BE Phat Motel)Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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