Adorable Bonding Moment with Twentieth Century’s Kristin Chenoweth & Peter Gallagher

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on July 19, 2015 View Comments On The Twentieth Century Star Files It’s almost time to jump on the train! The new revival of On the Twentieth Century arrives on Broadway beginning February 12, 2015, and if Twitter is any indication, stars Kristin Chenoweth and Peter Gallagher are already spending some quality time together. Chenoweth posted a snapshot with her “handsome leading man”—the duo is all dressed up for a photo shoot for the new Roundabout Theatre company production. Wow, these two make a seriously cute couple—we can’t wait to see the final shots! Check out this Hot Shot of the stars hanging out behind the scenes, then see Gallagher play Broadway producer Oscar Jaffe and Chenoweth play his glamorous former lover Lily Garland in On the Twentieth Century at the American Airlines Theatre. Kristin Chenoweth Related Showslast_img read more

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Emily Padgett & More Set for Broadway-Bound Waterfall

first_imgBroadway alums Emily Padgett (Side Show), Thom Sesma (The Times They are A-Changin’) and J. Elaine Marcos (Annie) will join the previously reported Bie Sukrit in the world premiere of Waterfall. The Broadway-bound musical will run at the Pasadena Playhouse May 29 through June 28, followed by an engagement at Seattle’s 5th Avenue Theatre October 1 through October 25.Based on the Thai novel Behind the Painting by Sriburapha, Waterfall follows a young Thai student who falls in love with the American wife of a Thai diplomat. The story of their forbidden love parallels history as the new democracy of Siam moves into the vortex of the increasingly anti-American Japan.Directed by Tak Viravan and choreographed by Dan Knechtges, Waterfall features a book and lyrics by Richard Maltby Jr. and music by David Shire. View Commentslast_img read more

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Christmas Trees

first_imgI always feel festive when I see trees decorated this time of year. If you decide to put a tree up in your home or office, follow these safety tips from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension to keep you, your family members and friends safe.If you decide to purchase a live tree, choose one that is fresh. Your tree will shed some of its needles, but that is okay. If you find a tree with a lot of shedding, pick another tree, even if the price is good.Make sure that your tree stand is the correct size. Before trying to place your tree in the stand, cut approximately 2 inches off of the bottom of the trunk. Make sure that there is always water in the stand so that your tree won’t dry out. Avoid placing your tree near a fireplace or other heat sources, such as radiators, heating vents, lights or candles.Another way to celebrate with a live tree is to buy a balled-and-burlapped tree so that it can be replanted after the holiday. The same safety precautions apply for a live tree as previously mentioned for a cut tree. Visit your local nursery or big-box home improvement store to see what is available in your area.If you decide to use an artificial tree, there are other safety precautions to consider. Make sure that the tree is made of flame-resistant material, and if the tree is pre-lit, make sure it has a UL-listed label.Never use electric lighting on a metal tree. Doing so can create a charge to the tree and cause electrocution.Read the manufacturer’s instructions before assembling an artificial tree. It’s never a bad idea to have a fire extinguisher on hand. Never use frayed or damaged tree lighting or extension cords, and do not cover electrical cords with rugs.Do not place the tree too far from the wall, as children may run behind it and trip. Do not use more than three strings of lighting on a single tree.Once the holiday season is over, leave your live tree at the curbside if you live in the city. Recycling options include taking the tree to a location that grinds trees into mulch or creating a fish attractor by weighting the base of the tree and sinking it in a pond or lake.Before recycling, remove all decorations. Live trees are biodegradable. Most decorations are not. For more ways to repurpose a live tree, visit realchristmastrees.org/dnn/All-About-Trees/How-to-Recycle.last_img read more

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Teachers’ Pet: Trout in the Classroom

first_imgWhen you were in grade school, odds are you had a classroom pet at some point—maybe a gerbil, a hamster, or even a rabbit if you were lucky. Students took turns taking care of the pet, feeding it, changing its dirty cage and so on as a way to garner a sense of responsibility and leadership. In Henry County in southern Virginia, they do something a little different in regards to having a class pet: instead of a small mammal in a cage, they have a cold water tank with dozens of fingerling trout.The Trout in the Classroom (TIC) program was started over 20 years ago by several organizations, most notably Trout Unlimited, as a way for teachers to introduce more environmental themes into their curriculum. Classrooms are equipped with a tank, water chiller, filter, and trout eggs from a local hatchery. Throughout the year, the students witness the development of the trout from egg to fry to fingerling while monitoring their progress by collecting data, regulating feeding, and examining water quality. The final step is a field trip to a local trout river where the fingerlings are released.Through the efforts of Martinsville orthodontist Dr. David Jones, who put up a significant sum of his own money to get the project off the ground. TIC was brought to southwest Virginia in 2005. It has since grown into one of the single largest programs in the country. This year, for the first time, the TIC program is raising all three species of Virginia trout – brook, brown, and rainbow – in 38 classroom tanks spread across six counties in Virginia and North Carolina. Through the program, students not only learn about a trout’s lifecycle, but the ecosystem as well.“We use the whole thing to teach water quality, protection of natural resources, and good stewardship of environment,” says Brian Williams, one of Henry County TIC’s founders and program manager at the Dan River Basin Association (DRBA).As an indicator species, trout are a marker of a healthy watershed, something TIC instills in participating students with a hands-on approach. By taking ownership of the trout, they connect the dots between a healthy river system, the environment, and their community. DRBA Education Outreach Coordinator Krista Hodges sees this didactic experience firsthand each time she enters a TIC classroom.“The kids are really interested in taking care of the trout, but when they actually release them into the river they are really concerned about their trout,” she said.She tells one story of a release day when the kids spotted a great blue heron upstream from where they were putting the trout in the water. The students became very concerned about the safety of their fish, demonstrating the links between predators, prey, and the ecosystem they learned in class.The TIC program incorporates many different lessons besides the science and watershed education, including fine arts and social studies. Students write in journals about their experiences, illustrate ideal trout habitats, use mathematics to calculate feeding charts and survival rates, and study government and the history of the Smith and Dan rivers to examine why they are suitable as a trout ecosystem. All these lessons are geared toward the Standards of Learning test guidelines, so teachers do not have to choose between hands-on learning and helping their students succeed in the eyes of the state. The larger impact of the program on high-risk students has been dramatic, and cannot be understated, says Williams.“Every year we have stories where teachers say they had a student who was falling through the cracks, failing grades, not coming to class or something,” he said. “Then they get interested in Trout in the Classroom and start coming in, feeding the trout, taking care of them, and grades change and turn around. You never know how you’re going to affect that one kid or a whole school.”Williams says they have more requests for tanks from teachers and administrators than they can fill, a testament to the reputation of the TIC program. The DRBA and Trout Unlimited add to the excitement of release day by inviting political figures to witness the event; former Virginia Governor Tim Kaine and Senator Mark Warner are among those who have participated, and last year’s release was attended by NASCAR superstar Jimmy Johnson. The promise of a big event at the end of the project is a major motivator for the kids and is just another aspect of TIC that keeps them engaged in learning. By instilling a solid base on which to build a broader awareness of conservation and pride in a healthy environment and community, TIC reaches beyond just the classroom to, hopefully, become a way of life.“When we first started, some kids didn’t even know the name of the Smith River that ran through their town, much less what a macro invertebrate is,” Williams said. “Now, just about every kid in Henry County and the surrounding counties has been exposed to water quality, macro invertebrates, trout, the habitat, all the things the river needs to stay healthy and clean, and that’s our objective.”Want to catch more trout? Check out our Guide’s Guide to Southern Trout!last_img read more

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U.S. to Strengthen Military Cooperation with Argentina

first_imgBy Eduardo Szklarz/Diálogo August 20, 2018 During his first official visit to South America, U.S. Secretary of Defense James N. Mattis described Argentina as a “partner and a friend.” Mattis and Argentine Minister of Defense Oscar Aguad held a press conference at the Ministry of Defense in Buenos Aires, August 15, 2018. “We want closer military collaboration with Argentina,” Mattis told the press. “Trusted and transparent military relations between democracies in our hemisphere are a positive factor in terms of stability and safety of our people.” Mattis is the first U.S. secretary of defense to come to Buenos Aires since Donald Rumsfeld in 2005. He arrived in the city after visiting Brasília and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, as part of a regional tour that includes Chile and Colombia. The head of the Pentagon said that the United States appreciates Argentina’s “growing role on the global stage, illustrated by your hosting the G20 Summit.” The event to be held November 30-December 1, 2018, in Buenos Aires, will gather the heads of state from major economies of the world. “As Vice President [Mike] Pence said in his visit last year, Argentina’s global leadership is good for our hemisphere,” Mattis said. The visit, for Minister Aguad, favored talks about common interests and strengthened both countries’ strategic relationship. “The closeness of our nations is reflected in the U.S. collaboration during the ARA San Juan’s tragedy,” Minister Aguad said about the Argentine Navy’s submarine and its crew of 44 that went missing on November 15, 2017. “This country contributed the most to searches. We want to thank you once more for a gesture that will never be forgotten.” Weapons of mass destruction Mattis said the United States. and Argentina are working together in a wide range of measures, including humanitarian assistance, natural disaster relief, and the non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. He highlighted the importance of the State Partnership Program (SPP), implemented in 2016 between the Argentine Ministry of Defense and the Georgia Army National Guard. For Aguad, opportunities to improve U.S. and Argentina’s collaboration abound. “Although Argentina pulled away from its loyal partners and friends for many years, we are back on the track we should never have left,” he said. “Much was achieved in the bilateral relationship, yet much more can be done. As our President [Mauricio] Macri said during his visit to the White House, we are committed to a smart, mutually beneficial relationship. We have a lot to build. We will work today for the present and the future of our relations.” The official program for the visit was not released. However, according to local media, Mattis and Aguad addressed cybersecurity, military sales, and cooperation in peacekeeping missions. The restructuring of the Argentine Armed Forces, which President Macri announced in July, was another topic of discussion. Service members’ new role will include logistics support for security forces in the fight against narcotrafficking, among other duties. “I have come to Buenos Aires to listen, to learn. And I look forward to finding new ways to deepen our mutually beneficial defense relationship. Together we can help forge a brighter future for the next generation of Argentines and North Americans,” Mattis told the press. Shared values According to Mattis, the meeting with Aguad perpetuates the bilateral relationship that started 200 years ago. He recalled Argentine air support to the United States during the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. The U.S., he added, “won’t forget” that Argentina also sent naval ships to Iraq during the Gulf War of 1991. “Today, the U.S. and Argentina are bound by ties of history and of our shared love of freedom, democracy, the rule of law, to guarantee personal liberty of our citizens,” he said. At the end of the conference, Mattis, a retired U.S. Marine Corps general, thanked Argentines for their warm welcome. “Since arriving in Buenos Aires last evening, I have enjoyed the same warm, gracious hospitality that our vice president enjoyed in this city, hospitality that the Argentine poet Jorge Luis Borges called ‘as eternal as water and air.’”last_img read more

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January 15, 2004 On the Move

first_imgJanuary 15, 2004 On the Move January 15, 2004 On the Move On the Move Julie A. Horstkamp has recently become a shareholder at Kirk-Pinkerton, P.A., with offices at 720 S. Orange Ave., Sarasota 34236, telephone (941) 364-2400. Horstkamp concentrated her practice in commercial and residential real estate law. The Law Office of Kevin V. Canipelli has relocated to 3609 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville 32207, telephone (904) 398-2495. Canipelli practices in the areas of wills, probate of estates, personal injury, and criminal law. Paul Rampell and Guy Rabideau have formed Rampell & Rabideau, L.L.P., with offices at 50 Cocoanut Row, Suite 220, Palm Beach 33480. Jason L. Harr has become associated with Grower, Ketcham, Rutherford, Bronson, Eide & Telan, P.A., with offices at 390 N. Orange Ave., Suite 1900, Orlando 32801, telephone (407) 423-9545. Beppy Landrum has become associated with Baker & Hostetler, L.L.P., Orlando. Landrum concentrates in the areas of corporate transactions representing profit and not-for-profit corporations and foundations, partnerships, limited liability companies, and government agencies. Epstein Becker & Green announces the opening of a Miami office which will be managed by employment attorney Michael W. Casey, II. George M. Osborne has joined Englander & Fischer, P.A., with offices at 721 First Ave. N., St. Pete., 33701, telephone (727) 898-7210. Daniel B. Rosenthal has joined Quarles & Brady in Boca Raton as senior counsel. Rosenthal will be a part of the firm’s litigation group. Heather A. Bradley has become associated with Walters Levine Brown Klingensmith & Thomison, P.A. She practices in the areas of business and construction litigation. Steven K. Brumer has co-founded Online Directives, Inc., an advance directive and living will registration service, located at www.onlinedirectives.com. Daniel A. Hoffman announces the opening of Hoffman Law located at 1718 Main Street, Ste. 202, Sarasota, 34236, phone (941) 330-2400. His practice focuses on estate planning, entertainment law, and corporate services. Timothy J. Inacio, Clifton D. Gavin and Karl W. Labertew have joined Schofield & Wade, P.A., and will practice in general civil trial litigation. R. Scott Ritchie has also joined the firm and will practice in the areas of insurance defense, construction litigation, and workers’ compensation. Travis J. McMillen has become associated with Grower, Ketcham, Rutherford, Bronson, Eide & Telan, P.A., with offices at 390 N. Orange Ave., Ste. 1900, Orlando, 32801, telephone (407) 423-9545. Amie K. Riggle has become associated with Akerman Senterfitt in the Miami office. She will focus her practice on commercial litigation. Lindsay E. Raphael Cohen has become an associate with Tripp Scott. Cohen will focus her practice on property financing and transaction counsel to buyers, sellers, lenders and developers of residential and commercial real estate. Nathalie F. Scott, formerly of Fowler White Burnett P.A., has become an associate with Akerman Senterfitt in the Ft. Lauderdale office. She will focus her practice on securities litigation and regulatory proceedings. Barbara M. Brown has become associated with O’Connor & Associates, with offices located at 2240 Belleair Road, Suite 160, Clearwater, 33764, telephone (727) 539-6800. She practices in the areas of mortgage foreclosures, commercial and real estate law, estate planning, probate, and civil litigation. Belinda Barndollar Lazzara has become a partner with Meros, Smith & Olney, P.A., located at 757 Arlington Avenue N, St. Petersburg, Florida, 33701, (727) 822-4929. She concentrates in the area of marital and family law. Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, announces the opening of its office in Miami. The office will be headed by David DeMaio and Michael Whelan. Attorneys Mike Davey and Kelly Cartus Hughes have joined the firm. The practice concentrates on labor and employment law. Rumberger, Kirk and Caldwell, P.A., announces the relocation of its Orlando office to downtown Orlando’s Lincoln Plaza. The firm provides litigation and counseling services and various civil practice areas. Michelle Buckalew has become associated with the law firm of Weiss Serota Helfman Pastoriza Guedes Cole & Boniske, P.A. She represents municipalities, public officials and individuals, primarily in government related litigation. Jennifer Ford Knopf, Shelli Willis de Roos and Carrie Eisnaugle have become associated with Holland & Knight in the Orlando office. Knopf concentrates in labor and employment law. Eisnaugle and de Roos concentrate in business law. Claude R. Moulton, P.A., announces the relocation of its offices to 2014 N. Laura St., Jacksonville, 32206, telephone (904) 632-0120, and to 5532 N.W. 43 St., Ste. A, Gainesville 32653, telephone (352) 240- 3208. The firm concentrates in the areas of real estate and business law. Fowler White Boggs Banker announces that David L. Bresler has been named office managing shareholder of the firm’s St. Pete. office, Robert J. Stommel has been named office managing shareholder of the firm’s Naples office, and Mitchell I. Horowitz has been named statewide corporate practice group leader. Robert Allen Law, formerly Allen & Galego, announces that Charles Lea Hume, formerly of Baker & McKenzie, has joined the firm as a shareholder and will practice in the areas of commercial and corporate law; John Mischel has become a shareholder and will continue to practice in the areas of tax and corporate law; and Umberto Bonavita, formerly with Weil & Gotchal, has joined the firm as an associate and will practice in the areas of commercial and corporate law. Offices are located at 601 Brickell Key Dr., Suite 805, Miami 33131, telephone (305) 372-3300. Harvey Hyman, previously with Miami-Dade State Attorney, and the Hillsborough County Public Defender, announces the opening of his law firm, Harvey Stuart Hyman, Criminal Trial Attorney. He will concentrate in state criminal cases.last_img read more

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How I met my lender

first_img 35SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Michelle Oliphant Michelle Oliphant is a member of the marketing department at Accenture Mortgage Cadence, a position she has held since 2012. She focuses primarily on product marketing, helping to shape the … Web: www.accenture.com Details I bought a home just last month. I had a number of reasons to go down this road: Rental rates where I live are very high, and my family, friends, and job are here, so I was ready to put down roots and stay in one place for a while. I also wanted to make an investment.However, as a millennial, I feel like my generation is still misunderstood by most lenders. Whether it is because of the crushing volume of student loan debt, because of a general distrust of institutions after the financial crisis, or because we value mobility and technology seemingly above all else, it’s clear that there is a shift in the way we millennials think about our finances, housing, and lifestyles. This presents new challenges for lenders, forcing them to approach this group in a different way.Economists speculate every day about how to attract millennials to home buying. As the largest generation since the Baby Boomers, we represent a huge opportunity. Yet, while it’s clear that attracting millennials is crucial, what isn’t clear is how to go about it. The lessons gleaned from my own home buying experience – starting with how I met my lender – may provide valuable insight into the mindset of my generation. From initial advertising to the application process and follow-up, there were a number of key steps our lender took to attract – and ultimately retain – our business.The first step in buying a home was finding a lender. Going to a credit union first was a natural choice, as I’ve been a member of a credit union most of my life. For comparison purposes, I applied with more than one lender, submitting applications at my primary credit union, as well as two others in my community. In addition to being people-focused, I found that credit unions offer comprehensive home financing products and good rates. They are smaller and community-oriented.With all that said, however, credit unions remain the best kept secret of personal finance; with smaller advertising budgets and less publicity than larger lenders, they provide great service to their members, though don’t seem to aggressively seek new members.This brings me to the first lesson: advertising directly to millennials, via the appropriate digital channels, is crucial. While advertisements for the biggest names in banking are splashed all over the internet –especially via social media – it is rare to see any credit union advertising. This is a mistake. Without my existing membership at a credit union, which I’ve had since I was young, I would not have known to go there to apply for a mortgage. In addition to the credit union I belong to, I chose two others based on their presence in real estate finance. After narrowing down the lenders, I went to their websites to apply. A couple of them offered an easily accessible consumer application. Another simply offered a form, soliciting my contact information with the promise that a staff member would reach out soon.With short, digestible groups of questions, the online applications each took about 15 minutes to complete. They were easy to understand and easy to finish. In stark contrast, the lender offering the “contact us” form responded after 24 hours, when the loan officer sent over a clunky PDF of the 1003, the traditional, paper-based mortgage application. I was to print, fill out, scan, and it back via email. The form was confusing. It was daunting. And I needed a magnifying glass.This brings me to my second lesson: Offering an online mortgage application, one that is clear, simple, and educational, is not optional. The credit union offering the online application contacted me within a couple of hours. After setting up a time to talk, we discussed the process, what to expect, what monthly payment we were looking for, how escrow would work, and some first-time home buyer programs. I was at ease with this lender and felt completely confident in their ability to help me through the process.In contrast, the CU with the “contact us” form on their website called and then sent over a pre-qualification letter the next day. There was no guidance offered, no education, no feeling that they were there to help me. In fact, three months have passed and they still haven’t even followed up with me once.Prompt follow-up and step-by-step explanation of the process is the third key lesson to retain the millennial market. A few days of delay, with no further follow-up, is not acceptable in our fast-paced world. The lessons here are broad: when going after the millennial market, increase visibility via social media, and directly target the digital venues that millennials frequent.Making the mortgage application easy to use and straightforward via the internet is essential and a good first step; also consider investing in e-signature and document imaging technology to further improve the borrowing experience. Our technological world means that information is available within seconds. Millennials have grown up in this world and know how to navigate it. You must be responsive and faster than you think you need to be. Be friendly, and be an educator throughout the process.In the end, my mortgage processing, underwriting, and the eventual closing was just as easy as the application – but that’s a story for another day.last_img read more

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Golar LNG Partners buys stake in Hili Episeyo FLNG

first_imgGolar LNG, Keppel, and Black and Veatch have entered into an agreement to sell its stakes in Golar Hilli, a company that owns the Hilli Episeyo FLNG vessel.The FLNG unit, being converted in the Keppel yard in Singapore, will be deployed later this year in Cameroon, to produce gas for Perenco.The three companies said on Wednesday that the buyer was Golar LNG Partners, which will, upon the closing of the transaction, indirectly own the Golar Episeyo floating liquefied natural gas vessel.As for the interest to be acquired by Golar LNG Partners, it represent the equivalent of 50% of the two liquefaction trains, out of a total of four, that have been contracted to Perenco Cameroon SA and Societe Nationale Des Hydrocarbures for an eight-year term.The sale price for the interests is $658 million less net lease obligations under the financing facility for the Hilli that are expected to be between $468 and $480 million.Upon the closing, which is subject to certain conditions, Golar, Keppel and B&V will sell 50% of the Common Units to the Partnership in return for the payment of the net purchase price of between approximately $178 and $190 million. The sale is expected to close on or before April 30, 2018.last_img read more

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It’s the end for CYF – AGAIN!

first_imgFaces of Innocents: CYF to be shut down and replaced by a new ministryStuff co.nz 28 July 2016Family First Comment: This sentence sums it up. “CYF’s name has been subtly changed three times before and it’s been restructured at least 14 times since its inception in 1992.”The Govt can’t spend their way or name-change or restructure out of family breakdown. They need to look at the causes – declining marriage rates, increased family breakdown, increasing drugs and alcohol abuse and associated mental illness, welfare dependency. #familystructuremattersThe long and chequered story of Child, Youth and Family will be officially at an end by March 2017, replaced by a new agency. Katie Kenny reports for the Faces of Innocents project.A new Ministry for Vulnerable Children will take over from CYF in April next year.It’s understood a chief executive for the new Government department has already been picked.While “Ministry for Vulnerable Children” is expected to be the new name for the department, this has not been finalised by Cabinet.However, the transformation programme is well under way with an extra $347 million allocated in the Budget for the care and protection of children and young people.CYF’s name has been subtly changed three times before and it’s been restructured at least 14 times since its inception in 1992.“CYF as we know it will no longer exist after March 2017,” acting Minister for Social Development Hekia Parata said on Wednesday.READ MORE: http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/faces-of-innocents/82526149/Faces-of-Innocents-CYF-to-be-shut-down-and-replaced-by-a-new-ministry?cid=app-iPhonelast_img read more

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Westport Fire Department fights attic fire.

first_imgWESTPORT, Ind. — The Westport Volunteer Fire Department battled an attic fire in a Westport home Monday afternoon.The fire caused damage to the home and displaced the occupants.The call came into Decatur County dispatch around 2:10 PM and firefighters were called to 312 E Main Street.Homeowners, Delmar and Connie Davis, directed firefighters to the second floor where firefighters found smoke.A small fire was discovered in insulation.Firefighters extinguished the fire in less than 10 minutes, but spend around 90 minutes on scene.Fire officials determined the cause of the fire was an electrical problem.last_img

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