Skylight’s Carey Mulligan Expecting First Child

first_img Related Shows Carey Mulligan has some good news, and we’re not talking about those rave reviews and the Tony nomination she received for her performance in Broadway’s Tony-winning Skylight! Us Weekly reports that she is pregnant with her and hubby Marcus Mumford’s first child.Mulligan made her Broadway debut in The Seagull in 2008. She earned an Oscar nomination for An Education and also appeared in Inside Llewyn Davis, The Great Gatsby, Drive, Never Let Me Go, Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps, Brothers, Pride and Prejudice, My Boy Jack, When Did You Last See Your Father? and Public Enemies.Mulligan and Mumford, the lead singer of Mumford & Sons, were pen pals as kids and later reconnected as adults. (Aw!) They married on April 21, 2012.The revival of David Hare’s Skylight will run through June 21 at the Golden Theatre. The production, directed by Stephen Daldry, also stars Bill Nighy and Matthew Beard. Show Closed This production ended its run on June 21, 2015 View Comments Skylightlast_img read more

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On Your Feet! Stars Ana Villafane & Josh Segarra Are Taking Your Questions!

first_img Star Files Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 20, 2017 On Your Feet! Josh Segarra & Ana Villefane in ‘On Your Feet!'(Photo: Matthew Murphy) Ana Villafañe and Josh Segarra, the stars of Broadway’s On Your Feet!, are taking a breather from doing the conga to answer your questions. That’s right; we’re letting them take a break from being on their feet to plop down on the Broadway.com couch for a round of Ask a Star. What did the real Gloria and Emilio say when they auditioned in front of them? How do you say “I love you” five-six-seven times without it getting repetitive? Exactly how much (or how little) fabric is used in those Emilio shorts? Ask away below, and tune in later as the caliente couple interview each other!<a data-cke-saved-href="https://broadway.wufoo.com/forms/mjz1h4d1obz8d8/" href="https://broadway.wufoo.com/forms/mjz1h4d1obz8d8/">Fill out my Wufoo form!</a>center_img Related Shows View Comments Ana Villafañelast_img read more

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Eight Shows to Look Out for at NYMF

first_img Lesli Margherita (Photos courtesy of New York Musical Festival) Star Files View Comments The thirteenth annual New York Musical Festival officially starts on July 11, kicking off a month of workshop productions, developmental readings and concerts of shows to look out for. Several musicals, including Next to Normal, [title of show] and Altar Boyz got their big break at NYMF, so this is your chance to stay ahead of the curve. Below are eight picks with talented stars, intriguing scores and noteworthy premises that caught our eye. For the full lineup and tickets, visit the NYMF website.RemissionReading: July 11, 15 & 17Tony nominee Emily Skeggs will take a quick hiatus from Fun Home to explore another troubled college student at NYMF. In the reading of Rebekah M. Allen’s musical, Skeggs will play Davy, a junior who hides her cancer diagnosis and copes with life or death decisions through storytelling and fantasy. Like Fun Home, the show’s tone jumps between somber and unexpectedly energetic while facing dark themes.A Lasting ImpressionReading: July 13 & 20Jennifer Damiano and Meghann Fahy both played Natalie in Next to Normal on Broadway, and now they’ll share the stage as siblings. The show follows the connections and relationships between sisters Kali and Simone and Jo (played by Ciara Renée), a journalist who returns from assignment in Syria. Whitney Mosery, who worked with Damiano as the associate director of American Psycho, will helm the reading of Emily Kaczmarek and Zoe Sarank’s musical.Eh Dah? Questions for My FatherSolo Show: July 19, 20, 23, 24, 25 & 28Self-proclaimed “Ghetto-Hippie-Arab-Commie-China Doll” Aya Aziz tackles culture wars, Islamophobia and more in her semi-autobiographical solo show. The performance artist and songwriter weaves through several characters and voices to find the balance between her eclectic New York City life with the uncertainties of her Egyptian-American father and Muslim family. For a taste of Aziz’s unique sound and style, check out footage from her previous show, Sitting Regal by the Window.IconProduction: July 20, 23, 24 & 26A lavish score, Broadway grand dames and an intricate plot involving an American princess and an ill-fated affair all come into play in this romantic drama. Jonathan Kaldor and Sebastian Michael’s musical follows an American debutante who marries into a royal family and the affair with her music teacher turns violent, as well as a young man who uncovers his grandfather’s story 40 years later. The starry lineup includes Donna McKechnie and Tony Sheldon.A Scythe of TimeProduction: July 21, 23, 24 & 26Lesli Margherita in a fancy hat with peacock feathers? You’ve got our attention. The Broadway.com favorite will star in Alan Harris and Mark Alan Swanson’s show, which follows a 19th-century London writer as she attempts to solve the mystery of the deaths of several contemporaries. So like Mrs. Wormwood, she’s British, but this time, she loves reading. Inspired by two Edgar Allan Poe stories, the production also features PJ Griffith and Matt Dengler.Bread and RosesReading: July 22An all-star cast, including Mandy Gonzalez, Jon Rua (recently of Hamilton) and Mary Testa will take part in a developmental reading of this new musical, inspired by a true story and based on the film of the same name. With a sound that blends cultures and genres, Jill Abramovitz and Brad Alexander tell the story of Maya, a young Mexican woman who crosses the U.S. border to work with her sister as a janitor. After facing harsh and abusive conditions, she joins the movement to unionize the workers.Dust Can’t Kill MeProduction: August 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 & 7Once Tony nominee Elizabeth A. Davis and Spring Awakening’s Kathryn Gallagher are no strangers to incorporating instruments into their performances, and they’ll do so once more for this folk musical. The story follows a group of individuals who journey into the desert during the Dust Bowl following a prophet’s promise of paradise. The score, by Elliah Heifetz and Abigail Carney, is already one to keep your ears out for, having already picked up accolades from Fringe NYC.Newton’s CradleProduction: August 3-7Tony winner Victoria Clark will put her director’s cap on to helm a workshop of a new musical by mother-and-son team Kim and Heath Saunders (the latter set to make his Broadway debut this fall). The story, set to an electro-pop score, follows Evan Newton (played by Heath), a young man who, after proposing to his girlfriend, is forced to confront his family and fight the labels—like “autistic”—he was given from an early age.last_img read more

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Alakazam! Broadway Balances America Will Show You the Magic of The Illusionists—Live From Broadway

first_img Want to see a magic trick? Broadway Balances America, the special six-part series airing on The Balancing Act on Lifetime Television, kicks off its third season on August 8 (the episode will re-air on August 15) with an exclusive look at the touring production of The Illusionists—Live From Broadway. Tune in as The Balancing Act takes viewers behind the scenes of the internationally-acclaimed spectacle, which has shattered box office records across the globe.In this episode, correspondents Amber Milt and Olga Villaverde get in on the act and discover what it takes to suspend disbelief for eight performances a week. Viewers will meet “The Trickster” Jeff Hobson in-studio and witness an illusion that will leave them speechless. Hobson will discuss how a theatrical, magic spectacular balances a Broadway season. The touring production showcases the jaw-dropping talents of seven of the most incredible illusionists on earth.In The Illusionists—Live From Broadway, audiences witness stunning acts of grand illusion, levitation, mind-reading, disappearance, a full view water torture escape and more. This group of world-class performers take their cue from the showmanship of the great illusionists of the past—such as Harry Houdini—and pair it with a new and updated contemporary aesthetic. Collectively, these performers have been seen by millions of people around the world and this production showcases their incredible talents together on stage for the very first time.Visit the official Broadway Balances America website to discover more about this exciting series and to find out which Broadway musicals will also be featured! ‘The Illusionists—Live From Broadway’ View Commentscenter_img Broadway Balances Americalast_img read more

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Early Spring Mistake

first_imgBut with the soil ideal for planting, Beasley was telling farmers to wait. “Weather is veryfickle,” he said. “Don’t let it lull you into a false sense of security.” Wait until fields havethose same soil conditions, he said, between April 15 and May 20. Unusually warm days and nights in early March warmed the soil to temperatures ideal forplanting peanuts. And early spring rains provided the moisture seeds need to germinate. “Yes, we do normally recommend that farmers plant their peanut crop when soiltemperatures rise above 65 degrees for three or more days. But early March is just tooearly,” said John Beasley, a peanut agronomist with the University of Georgia ExtensionService. But the temptation is there. Farmers have to carefully schedule their planting based onweather, soil conditions and other tasks on the farm. The virus stunts young plants’ growth so they often don’t even produce peanut pods.Plants infected after pods form may not produce any more pods, but there are at leastsome nuts on the plant for harvest. “There’s a lot at stake here,” Beasley said. Sunny, breezy days. Trees budding into a thousand shades of green and flowers flauntingall the colors they can create. It feels like spring, when a man’s thoughts turn naturally toplanting. “More and more farming operations work more land with fewer workers,” he said. “Thatputs a lot of stress on farmers to get everything done in a timely manner.” Beasley said peanut seeds are extremely sensitive to temperature changes. “Once the seed germinates and sprouts leaves, it’s a little more cold hardy,” he said. “But ifthe farmer plants and a cold front moves through, he’s running the risk that the seed won’tgerminate and will just sit there prone to disease organisms and rot.”center_img That alone is enough to convince many farmers to wait, he said. Beasley and UGA plant pathologists and entomologists figured this virus cost Georgiafarmers about 10 percent of their 1996 crop, or $38.8 million. If a cold front moves into the area after soil preparation but before planting, it may forcethe farmer to wait to plant. That can undo all he’s done to get the soil ready. “All our research on TSWV,” he said, “shows the heaviest losses in peanuts planted beforeApril 10.” “Georgia’s $388.5 million peanut crop is at stake,” he said. Planting peanuts too early cancost farmers dearly. “Herbicides and insecticides can dissipate — the farmer may have to reapply those,”Beasley said. “Heavy rainfall can pack the soil and form a crust — he may have toreharrow the field. A lot of money and time go into land preparation.” Farmers may face a bigger problem if they plant early. Beasley said tomato spotted wilt,caused by a virus, inflicts the most damage on peanuts planted early in the season. “I’m encouraging farmers to not be the first one in their neighborhood to plant,” he said.”It’s just not worth the risks to be able to say you’re first.”last_img read more

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Home Fruit Orchards

first_imgHaving a great home fruit orchard is getting easier all the time. University of Georgia scientists say new varieties make even south Georgia home gardeners able to grow peaches, nectarines, pears, plums and even apples.The U.S. Department of Agriculture designates two hardiness zones (8a and 8b) — areas with similar climates — south of a line running through Columbus, Macon and Augusta.Breeders produce varieties that are hardy in specific zones. Many varieties have thrived for years above Zone 8. And experts say the number of fruit trees below that Columbus-to-Augusta line is growing.”Wherever you live, if you can’t provide timely care for your fruit plants, select more forgiving plants that require little care,” said Gerard Krewer, a horticulturist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.Choosing the variety to plant requires more than knowing its hardiness. Consider pollination, fruit production and how much care the tree requires, too, Krewer said.Be sure you know if the variety can self-pollinate or needs cross-pollination to produce fruit. This differs for varieties of even the same type of fruit. Most apples and plums require cross-pollination. Pears vary by fruit variety, and peaches are self-pollinating.Once you’ve carefully selected varieties that will produce well where you live, then select a place to plant them.The specific planting site can make the difference between baskets of fruit and just another shade tree. Sunlight, and plenty of it, is the key.Pick a site where the tree will be in the sun at least half the day. Morning sun is best because it dries the dew quickly. The less time the tree is wet, the less likely disease will damage it.Then soil-test that site for the pH.Plow or spade the soil thoroughly to prepare it for planting. Mix in any required lime as you prepare the soil. Dig a hole large enough so the roots won’t be cramped or bent from their natural position.Never fertilize a fruit tree during planting.When you buy your fruit trees, look for undamaged trunks and good root systems. Krewer said a small tree with a good root system is better than a large tree with few roots.”You get what you pay for when you buy fruit trees,” Krewer said. “Bargain plants may not be healthy or well-adapted to your area.”Once you’ve prepared, selected and planted your trees, keep the area around them weed-free. Weeds take water and nutrients away from the young trees, threatening their survival.Don’t use mowers or weed trimmers near the trunks. Open wounds in the bark provide pathways for disease-causing organisms.Pruning and training fruit trees into their typical shapes take time, but the rewards are great. Without proper pruning, the trees can’t support the weight of the fruit they produce.Peach and plum trees respond well when pruned to an “open center” shape that looks like an umbrella blown inside out. Apple trees do best in the “central leader” system, with one strong center trunk and branches that radiate out.Fruit trees are susceptible to many insects and diseases that can decrease fruit production or damage the tree.”You have to plan and carry out a rigid pesticide spray schedule to really control insects and diseases in home apple, peach and plum orchards,” Krewer said.Pears require less attention. Krewer suggests Oriental persimmons and hybrid pears as good choices for low-spray orchards.Your county extension agent can tell you more about growing fruits in a home orchard. The UGA Extension website has links to publications with information on just about any other gardening, farming or home topic.last_img read more

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Holiday Employment.

first_imgUnemployment rates are likely to drop during the next few weeks. But don’t get too jolly over the joyful jobless news. “Unemployment is cyclical,” said Doug Bachtel, a professor of housing and consumer economics for the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences. “During the holidays, unemployment rates tend to be lower because of the huge demand in the retail sector,” he said. “For a while, Georgia has suffered from an employment shortage,” he said, “and retailers have had to grab any warm body they can — vacationing teachers and students, anybody — to work during the busy holiday season.” However, Bachtel warned, “there are those who believe the pending recession will hit Georgia hard.”Georgia’s Diversified Economy Softens Blow Georgia usually fares well in hard times because of a diversified economy. The hardest-hit part is likely to be rural areas, where the economy depends precariously on agriculture. “Rural Georgia will be hurt really badly,” Bachtel predicted. “The state has a diversified economy, but rural Georgia doesn’t. They are dependent on a boom-or-bust agricultural economy.” “The economic problems currently are in crop farming,” said UGA economist Bill Givan. “Livestock prices are pretty good.” Crop farming is done mostly below Macon. Peanut growers are faring well and tobacco farmers a little less so. “Cotton and grains are facing low prices,” he said. “But government payments will help.” In general, Givan said, “rural Georgia dependent on crop farming is having a tough time.”Employment Rates Hit 20-Year High A recent Georgia Department of Labor report shows Georgia’s unemployment numbers already growing. More than 65,220 Georgians filed initial claims for unemployment insurance benefits in October. These claims pushed the state’s jobless rate up to 4.2 percent from 4.0 percent in September. The new claims are 98 percent more than the 32,980 workers who filed initial claims in October 2000, when the rate was 3.7 percent. “The effects of Sept. 11 are clearly indicated in these numbers,” said State Labor Commissioner Michael Thurmond. “While these layoffs are concentrated in several industries, there are some fields for which employers are actually hiring. Those include an array of positions in health services, education, retail and law enforcement.” Thurmond encourages people who’ve lost their jobs to remember the seasonal jobs available around the holidays. “While the available jobs may not represent the ideal,” Thurmond said, “people are usually better served to accept temporary employment until the job they really want comes along.” On a month-to-month basis, the number of unemployment claims went up by 23,147, or 55 percent, from September. Most of the claims were filed in construction, business services, textile manufacturing, transportation and in hotels and restaurants. “If you compare the employment rates across the country, some will argue that an unemployment rate of just over 4 percent is full employment,” Bachtel said. “We are still going through the good times. It’s going to definitely get worse.”Military Money Boosts Economy The bad economic times in Georgia’s rural areas are, at least temporarily, bolstered by the flurry of military activity. “The military has a big effect on our economy because we have major military spending in this state,” Bachtel said. “It plays a very big role in the stabilization of the economy.” And it’s a pretty safe bet for Georgians, he said. “Ft. Benning is a training area. Ft. Stewart is a staging area for deployment. Kings Bay was the largest peacetime construction project in U.S. history. Others are specialized — Ft. Gordon is home to the signal corps — not installations likely to get cut in federal budget cuts,” he said. “If you’re a supplier of goods to the military, you’re doing pretty good right now,” he said. “But the biggest effect of the war is on consumer confidence. It seems to have sparked a rise in the stock market, so who knows?”last_img read more

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Organic alternatives

first_imgThere is nothing quite like the taste and freshness of homegrown vegetables. While growing them in the South can be a challenge – thanks to weeds, disease and insects – many of us prefer a more simplistic, environmentally-friendly approach to growing our veggies.Not to say an organic approach is the only way to grow produce. Chemical alternatives used correctly can certainly aid some gardeners and are no doubt vital in the commercial side of feeding our nation. However, in my two decades of gardening, I have found chemical dependence can be greatly reduced or eliminated by following sound management practices in the garden.Soil careThe strongest characteristic of a successful organic gardener is soil care. This is perhaps one of the single most important factors to preventing pests and problems in the garden. A stressed plant that grows slowly because of soil problems will likely be a target of disease and insects. And it may not survive.Soil care starts with adding generous amounts of organic matter to your planting site. Buying one or two bags of top soil or manure and dusting you garden plot with a fraction of an inch of amendment will not get the job done. Think in terms of adding 4 to 6 inches of a good, weed-free amendment and then till this deeply into the native soil.I added a foot of good top soil to my garden a few years ago, and it has done wonders for my crop. Since then, I’ve seen increased and faster germination of seeds, increased yield per plant and better resistance in times of drought or too much rain.FertilizerOne of the greatest debates among gardeners comes in the area of fertilization. True organic growers rely totally on natural materials such as stable manures, fish meal, bone meal and others. Other semi-organic growers, such as myself, draw the line at using chemical pesticides but don’t mind throwing in a little synthetic fertilizer to supplement the organic.Many folks don’t realize our plants are unable to tell a difference in the original source of nutrients they absorb. Nitrogen is nitrogen to a plant.The only real benefit of using organic fertilizer sources is they amend the soil and make a better root environment. They also must be broken down by organisms before they can be used as nutrients by plants. This can be a benefit as they supply nutrients to plants for much longer periods of time without frequent applications. There is also less chance of burning roots with organic fertilizers since they are less soluble.If there is a drawback to using organic fertilizers, it is because the nutrient content of most organic fertilizers is very low. It can take a lot of manure and bone meal to equal a small quantity of synthetic fertilizer. Where a common commercial synthetic fertilizer may contain 10 percent nitrogen, 10 percent phosphorous and 10 percent potassium, the average organic fertilizer may be closer to a ratio of 2:1:1 for these same elements.It would be nice to have a horse or cattle farm lined up in advance if you plan to use organic forms of fertilizers only.last_img read more

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Tift Building Rededication

first_imgThe University of Georgia rededicated the newly renovated H. H. Tift Building on the UGA Tifton Campus Sept. 27.Renovation of the historic Tift Building — the campus’s first structure — was completed in May and funded by $5 million in state support. The facility houses the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics as well as administrative offices. The renovated building also contains modern classroom space to provide faculty and students with the latest in learning technology.Speakers at the rededication ceremony included UGA President Jere W. Morehead, Dean of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Sam Pardue and UGA student and biological sciences major Lolita Muñoz.Morehead emphasized the important link between UGA Tifton and the surrounding communities. “Today, we celebrate more than the renovation of the historic Tift Building,” Morehead said. “We celebrate the unwavering and longstanding bond between UGA Tifton and the many communities it proudly serves all across South Georgia. Indeed, the strengths and opportunities of this area of the state and the mission of this campus are perfectly aligned.” The Tift Building complements the campus’s vital research enterprise, which is recognized worldwide for scientific discoveries related to agricultural commodities such as cotton, peanuts, pecans, turf grass and vegetables. “We are a campus that thrives on research and providing an academic home for our future agricultural leaders,” said UGA Tifton Assistant Dean Joe West. “This is an important day in our history. President Morehead’s presence, along with other administrative leaders, emphasizes the significance not only of the Tift Building but also of our entire campus.” Following the ceremony, Morehead met with students in the Tift Building to hear about their academic experiences on campus. He also met with state and local officials from the area. Morehead, Pardue and other members of the UGA senior adminis tration, including Vice President for Public Service and Outreach Jennifer Frum and Vice President of Government Relations Griff Doyle, then traveled to the Tift County Cooperative Extension office to visit with UGA employees there. The Tift County Cooperative Extension office serves as an important bridge between the resources of the university and the needs and interests of the community — especially in regard to agriculture. Pardue underscored the critical role of UGA Extension in promoting economic development in the state and beyond. “UGA’s academic, research and extension experts in Tifton deliver advanced education, cutting-edge science, improved agricultural production methods and knowledge of the latest crop varieties, market developments and business practices,” Pardue said. “Their dedicated efforts help to create a vibrant and robust economic engine that sustains not only this corner of the state, but provides food and fiber for Georgia and the world.” The group of senior administrators concluded their tour of the Tifton area with a visit to Carroll’s Sausage and Meats in Ashburn. The local business has grown from 18 to 40 employees in five years, thanks to assistance from the UGA Small Business Development Center (SBDC). The SBDC helped owner Hugh Hardy Jr. develop a business plan and loan proposal, secure financing options and renovate a facility into a large retail store off Interstate 75. The SBDC also helped Carroll’s Sausage and Meats secure a loan to open a Thomaston store in 2014 and continues to work with the business on strategic planning and marketing. “The Small Business Development Center at the University of Georgia is helping hundreds of small business owners grow their companies, as well as helping entrepreneurs launch new businesses,” Frum said. “The economic impact of the work of the SBDC is felt throughout the state in the number of new companies and jobs created every year.”last_img read more

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Christmas Trees

first_imgI always feel festive when I see trees decorated this time of year. If you decide to put a tree up in your home or office, follow these safety tips from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension to keep you, your family members and friends safe.If you decide to purchase a live tree, choose one that is fresh. Your tree will shed some of its needles, but that is okay. If you find a tree with a lot of shedding, pick another tree, even if the price is good.Make sure that your tree stand is the correct size. Before trying to place your tree in the stand, cut approximately 2 inches off of the bottom of the trunk. Make sure that there is always water in the stand so that your tree won’t dry out. Avoid placing your tree near a fireplace or other heat sources, such as radiators, heating vents, lights or candles.Another way to celebrate with a live tree is to buy a balled-and-burlapped tree so that it can be replanted after the holiday. The same safety precautions apply for a live tree as previously mentioned for a cut tree. Visit your local nursery or big-box home improvement store to see what is available in your area.If you decide to use an artificial tree, there are other safety precautions to consider. Make sure that the tree is made of flame-resistant material, and if the tree is pre-lit, make sure it has a UL-listed label.Never use electric lighting on a metal tree. Doing so can create a charge to the tree and cause electrocution.Read the manufacturer’s instructions before assembling an artificial tree. It’s never a bad idea to have a fire extinguisher on hand. Never use frayed or damaged tree lighting or extension cords, and do not cover electrical cords with rugs.Do not place the tree too far from the wall, as children may run behind it and trip. Do not use more than three strings of lighting on a single tree.Once the holiday season is over, leave your live tree at the curbside if you live in the city. Recycling options include taking the tree to a location that grinds trees into mulch or creating a fish attractor by weighting the base of the tree and sinking it in a pond or lake.Before recycling, remove all decorations. Live trees are biodegradable. Most decorations are not. For more ways to repurpose a live tree, visit realchristmastrees.org/dnn/All-About-Trees/How-to-Recycle.last_img read more

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