Cavani’s parents reveal preferred club despite Chelsea interest

first_imgEdinson Cavani’s mother and father claim their son has his heart on a move to Atletico Madrid despite interest from Chelsea.Advertisement Chelsea are exploring the possibility of signing the Uruguay international as Frank Lampard seeks to strengthen his options up front but it would appear the 32-year-old would favour a move to Spain.In an interview with Spanish television programme El Chiringuito, Cavani’s father claimed his son would sign for Diego Simeone’s side ‘tomorrow’ if the chance presented itself.“He wants to join another club in Europe,” Luis Cavani said. “That would please me that he plays here (at Atletico), yes.“(Diego) Simeone wants him now (in January). The head coach of Paris Saint-Germain (Thomas Tuchel) has also said he needs him to help compete in the Champions League.“But PSG do not want him to go to Atletico Madrid if he finds an agreement.“I think there is a strong chance he will go to Atletico, the option to join the club (Atletico) always remains in June.“There are lots of other clubs but when you give your word to a team, you respect it. If tomorrow, if he is available and Atletico still want him, I think he will sign.”Cavani’s mother has also given an interview to Madrid-based newspaper AS, revealing PSG have rejected three offers from Atletico for the striker. Cavani has handed in a transfer request at the Parc de Princes despite entering the final six months of his contract with the Ligue 1 champions. Loading… center_img Read Also: Chelsea target axed by PSG after handing in transfer requestWhether it is this month or in the summer when his PSG contract expires, Berta Gomez believes a move to Spain is on the cards.“It’s complicated but he wants to play at Atletico and if it’s not now, in the summer,” she said.“We are eager for some time but it doesn’t depend on my son but on PSG and Atletico Madrid. We understand their [PSG’s] position but what we don’t understand is that they want him to stay and then they only bring him out for six minutes. They are not treating him well considering what he has given to PSG in the almost seven years he has been there.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted ContentWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooPortuguese Street Artist Creates Hyper-Realistic 3D GraffitiThe Models Of Paintings Whom The Artists Were Madly In Love WithWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?Best & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table TopBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them6 Extreme Facts About Hurricanes7 Of The Wealthiest Universities In The World5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parkslast_img read more

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Climate change skeptic takes reins of Brazil’s science ministry

first_imgThe appointment of a reputed climate change denier as the head of Brazil’s science ministry has some scientists worried about the country’s environmental future. Others are withholding judgment, at least until the new minister, Aldo Rebelo, appoints the team of scientists and policymakers who will work with him for the next 4 years.Rebelo, a hard-line communist, labeled climate change an “environmental scam” in a 2010 open letter to environmentalist Marcio Santilli, according to Bloomberg View. As a legislator in Brazil’s Congress, he called the movement to curb the emission of greenhouse gases “nothing less, in its geopolitical essence, than the bridgehead of imperialism,” The New York Times reported this week. “His positions on climate change are completely out of phase with the Brazilian scientific community,” says Paulo Artaxo, an atmospheric physicist at the University of São Paulo who studies climate change in the Amazon. “We are expecting serious problems in several areas, such as environment, biodiversity, climate change, and forest protection.”But like many minister appointments in Brazil, President Dilma Rousseff’s selection of Rebelo to lead the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation (MCTI) was a political decision, not a scientific one, explains Helena Nader, the president of the Brazilian Society for the Advancement of Science (SBPC). “Rebelo is a representative of a party that strongly supported [Rousseff’s] reelection.” Rousseff narrowly won a second term this past October; Rebelo served as sports minister in Rousseff’s first administration. He was sworn into his new position at MCTI on 1 January.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Rebelo’s appointment comes at a critical moment for environmental policy in Brazil. In an address to the United Nation’s General Assembly this past September, Rousseff called climate change “one of the greatest challenges of our times” and pledged that Brazil would take a leadership role in future climate negotiations. By slowing deforestation in the Amazon, the country steadily curbed its own greenhouse gas emissions between 2004 and 2012. But in just the last year or so, emissions and deforestation both seem to be back on the rise, according to the Times.For many environmentalists, Rebelo’s new position at MCTI is even more worrisome because it comes in tandem with the appointment of Katia Abreu as Brazil’s new minister of agriculture. Abreu is in favor of development in the Amazon and has been dubbed the chainsaw queen by critics. She and Rebelo worked together on a 2012 revision of Brazil’s forest code, which an analysis in Science concluded was likely to increase deforestation. Taken together, the Rebelo and Abreu appointments “are deeply worrisome and seem at cross-purposes to Brazil’s leadership role on climate change and environment,” says Thomas Lovejoy, an ecologist at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, who has worked in the Amazon since the 1960s.Still, Nader says, “it is important to give Rebelo some time before” jumping to conclusions based on comments he made in the past. She says that several propositions from SBPC were ultimately incorporated into the revised forestry code, an experience that leaves her optimistic about working with Rebelo. “Our expectation is that regarding environmental issues, Dilma’s government is not going to backslide.”last_img read more

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