Trump: FL 2020 campaign launch is ‘hottest’ ticket of all rallies

first_imgTrump announced the event last month and confirmed that first lady Melania Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and second lady Karen Pence would join him at the June 18 event at Orlando’s Amway Center.The Amway Center fits up to 18,500 people and is a popular event site in Florida.According to reports, the Trump campaign’s event permit says about 17,000 people are expected to attend the rally, with overflow anticipated crowds outside.Additionally, the city of Orlando may need to account for extra costs including police and overtime pay for workers, reports say. Wednesday President Trump took to Twitter to express his excitement for his upcoming rally in Florida where he is expected to announce his candidacy in the 2020 presidential race.He said that the rally ‘looks to be the “hottest” ticket out of all his campaign events.’Wow! Just got word that our June 18th, Tuesday, ANNOUNCEMENT in Orlando, Florida, already has 74,000 requests for a 20,000 seat Arena. With all of the big events that we have done, this ticket looks to be the “hottest” of them all. See you in Florida!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 12, 2019last_img read more

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Confident Badgers climbing Big Ten standings

first_imgAlyssa Karel and Wisconsin hope to claim first place in the Big Ten against a streaking Iowa squad.[/media-credit]After their win over Northwestern Thursday, the Wisconsin Badgers are now sitting in third place in the Big Ten.However, head coach Lisa Stone and her team have their eyes on first. They will get an opportunity to reach their goal on Wednesday when they travel to Iowa City to take on the Iowa Hawkeyes.The Badgers only have one shot at the Hawkeyes this year. However, Stone feels that her team is prepared and that one shot is all it will need.“The fact that they have their same starting lineup back brings some familiarity to our players,” Stone said.Knowing personnel has always been important to the Badgers, but Stone isn’t worried about that this week.“When your players are telling you about the other team before you even talk about the scouting report, it’s a good sign,” Stone said.With her players taking the scouting report upon themselves, Stone is free to focus on other key things the Badgers will have to do in order to have success against the Hawkeyes. For instance, she wants Wisconsin to be in control of the tempo. Stone is well aware of the dangers of getting into a running match with the Hawkeyes, so she believes another key is going to be stopping the drive. In a recent win against Northwestern, Iowa scored close to 60 points in the second half alone. It also got to the line upward of 30 times.“We have to limit them to one shot; we have to get to shooters and make sure they are contested,” Stone said.Stone is also pleased with the convenient timing of her team’s bye weekend this year. Most Big Ten teams are playing Sunday, Wednesday, Saturday schedules this week, while the Badgers enjoyed the weekend off.“It has given us some time to prepare. We will find out if it has been advantageous for us; we are looking forward to a great week,” Stone said.With just four regular season games left, the Badgers are in the thick of the title race. However, Stone is staying true to her strategy of taking things one game at a time.“This week is no different than the weeks leading up to this game. No one game is any more important than the others. We will prepare as we have been preparing. I feel very good about our team in terms of our preparation,” Stone said.As always, Stone is leaning on her senior class to lead the team to a successful end to the season. Stone has repeatedly noted she can count on the seniors to be leaders on and off the court.“They have held themselves to a very high esteem both academically and athletically. They are our leaders in the locker room in terms of expectation and their will and their want to win a Big Ten championship,” Stone said. “When you have that atmosphere, it enlightens you as a coach. I count on them, every practice and every game.”This year, each of Wisconsin’s four seniors has served a specific role. Stone was especially complimentary of forward Tara Steinbauer and her contribution to the program.“Tara is the X-factor. It’s not just scoring, it’s all the little things. She is one of the toughest kids on our team. She has made some big shots for us throughout the year, but it’s her toughness on the court, and that’s what we need the rest of the way,” Stone saidThe Badgers look forward to honoring their dedicated senior class before and after Saturday’s home game against Michigan.“They are a special group of kids. I count on them every practice and every game,” Stone said.last_img read more

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Just another Bo Ryan campaign

first_imgThe Badger basketball team struggled once it reached the postseason, falling in the round of 64 to Ole Miss. The 57-46 loss showcased Wisconsin\’s inconsistency shooting the basketball in 2013.[/media-credit]Starters: B-Wisconsin’s starting five provided, as usual, the bulk of the offense this season, scoring on average 70 percent of the team’s total points per game. Defensively, the group was as solid as any in the country, spearheading a Badger defense that ranked top in the Big Ten and seventh nationally, allowing just 55.9 points per game.This was a balanced group across the board, but the Badgers suffered at times because there was no go-to guy like Jordan Taylor a season ago to look to during crunch time or offensive droughts. Just two players in the starting five registered in the conference’s top 30 scorers, a compliment to UW’s balance, but also a damnation of the starters’ weak offensive production.Senior forward Jared Berggren proved, always an extremely reliable defender, set the Wisconsin program record in blocks this season while altering so many of his opponents shots with his lane presence. But foul trouble plagued Berggren late in the year and often disappeared offensively for long stretches.Junior guard Ben Brust developed into a more well-rounded offensive threat and greatly improved on defense after being thrust into the starting lineup after Josh Gasser’s ACL injury in the preseason. Brust brought his scoring average up to 11.1 points per game this season, leading the team in that category.Besides Brust and Berggren earning All-Big Ten recognition in some form or another, neither sophomore point guard Traevon Jackson nor redshirt senior forwards Mike Bruesewitz and Ryan Evans performed at a continued high level for more than two games in a row during the season.Because of two players, this group gets above an average grade. If not for Brust and Berggren, it might have been an F.Bench: B-If one player can ever singularly define the work of an entire group, that player was Sam Dekker.For the greater part of the 2012-13 season, the freshman forward was the lone source of offensive production for a unit that otherwise relied heavily on its starting five to score. The freshman missed out on the Big Ten’s Sixth Man of the Year award but put together one of the finest freshman campaigns from a Badger in recent memory. Building a reputation for hitting shots that often turned the tide in Wisconsin’s favor, Dekker led UW in both overall and three-point shooting percentage on his way to posting 9.6 points per game.Aside from Dekker, it was sophomore forward Frank Kaminsky and redshirt freshman guard George Marshall who proved as the only other significant bench contributors. Kaminsky served as a serviceable backup to Jared Berggren in protecting the post, finishing the year with 17 blocks. But the offensive outbursts – like his 19-point outburst against Illinois – were too rare for him to fill in as a scorer in Berggren’s absence.After losing an early-season battle for the starting point guard spot, Marshall’s ankle-tying crossover and speed were a valuable change of pace from usual starter Traevon Jackson. The shifty redshirt freshman never reached double figures again after breaking out for 20 in a mid-January loss to Iowa, proving most valuable as a defender.Offense: DThere’s no easy way to put it: The Badgers stunk in 2012-13 when it came to scoring points. Like the patented 10-plus minute scoring drought that has become a trademark of head coach Bo Ryan’s teams for the last three years, Wisconsin was often night and day when it came to offensive production.There were the games where the team looked like world beaters, such as the road upset against Indiana, a home thrashing of Ohio State and two solid wins against top 10 teams in the Big Ten Tournament. But there also games where the team looked like they couldn’t beat a rec team, such as mind-numbingly cold shooting performances against Ohio State and Ole Miss at the end of the year.The Badgers had plenty of talent that could score. But too often the Badgers would fall in love with the three-point shot. The offense, in turn, lived and died by the success from beyond the arc. In all but three of the team’s 12 losses on the year, the team failed to shoot more than 30 percent from deep. In fact, there were several instances this year where 50 percent or more of UW’s shots came from beyond the arc.In 10 of Wisconsin’s 12 losses this year, the team failed to score more than 60 points. And the only player to register in the conference’s top 15 field goal percentage was freshman Sam Dekker.For that, the Badgers get a big ugly grade.Defense: A-Even for a program built around forcing opposing offenses into extreme discomfort, it is fair to say defense carried Wisconsin to its fourth-place Big Ten finish.When the shots did not fall – an all too common issue for the Badgers – their ability to slow down even the nation’s most prolific offenses (think Indiana) kept them in games. Limiting opponents to 55.9 points per game – tops in the conference and second only to Florida among teams that qualified for the NCAA tournament – it took time for the Badgers to find their collective offensive identity.Sitting at 7-4 through the season’s opening stretch, less-heralded defensive players like senior forward Ben Brust and sophomore guard Traevon Jackson made impressive strides to help Bo Ryan to his seventh-straight 20-win season. Their growth, coupled with the defensive anchors of senior forwards Jared Berggren and Ryan Evans, usually proved enough to withstand lengthy scoring droughts.In his final year on the floor, Berggren was a defensive force inside and led the Big Ten with 73 blocks this year. Evans, often responsible for guarding the opponent’s most lethal scorer, did an admirable job using his athleticism to make up for the height he often surrendered to the players he defended.last_img read more

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Top seven games of the semester

first_imgEvery year, there’s a game that fans have circled on their calendars from the moment the schedule comes out. After a rather lackluster Wisconsin home football schedule a year ago, this year’s lineup features several must-attend games.But for those students just getting to know Badger sports, there are a handful of other games outside of football that you’re not going to want to miss. If you haven’t circled these games on your calendar, you might want to break out a pen.Wisconsin vs. LSU (Football): Although the first game of Wisconsin’s schedule is far from the friendly confines of Camp Randall, this is possibly one of the biggest games in recent Badger football history. University of Wisconsin has had high profile match-ups in the past, including in the Capital One Bowl this past January against another SEC team, South Carolina. But a regular season game like this one — and the season opener at that — makes this game extremely meaningful. Not only does this game mean a lot for the Wisconsin football program, but it also carries with it a great deal of weight with it for the Big Ten as a whole. The Big Ten has been relatively weak lately, and this is a big statement game for the entire conference if Wisconsin wins. Playing in a big time environment in Houston and against a very viable playoff team in the Tigers makes this not only one of the best games of the semester, but a once in a lifetime opportunity.Wisconsin vs. Penn State (Volleyball): The one unfortunate thing about this National Championship game rematch is that it falls on a Wednesday, but even homework isn’t a good enough reason to miss what could very well be the Big Ten’s top two volleyball teams in action. Wisconsin returns with all but one key player from last season’s run to the championship game, and although the Badgers got swept in straight sets at the Field House last year against Penn State and then fell to the Nittany Lions again in the NCAA final, they are a year older and wiser this season. If you get a chance to be a part of the student section known as the Block Party, this is the game you’ll want to go to.Wisconsin vs. Penn State (Women’s Soccer): Penn State is the team to beat every year in the Big Ten, but this game goes much deeper than just a disdain for the Nittany Lions. Before coming to Wisconsin, Badgers head coach Paula Wilkins coached at Penn State and brought the program to the College Cup, college soccer’s version of the Final Four, on multiple occasions. Wilkins beat the Badgers quite often while at Penn State, but now in her eighth season with Wisconsin, she is tasked with leading her new squad against her former one. A season ago, the Badgers fell one goal short against the Nittany Lions, but with a starting 11 that will be almost exactly the same from a year ago, Wisconsin has a good chance to give PSU a run for the money and the Big Ten title.Wisconsin vs. Indiana (Men’s Soccer): Last season, while playing the defending National Champions at the McClimon Soccer Complex, the Badgers had an improbable comeback. They scored three unanswered goals in the final 20 minutes to knock off the Hoosiers in one of the greatest games in Wisconsin men’s soccer history. After making the NCAA tournament for the first time since 1995, the Badgers’ game this year against Indiana could again determine their postseason fate. Even if you’re not a soccer fan, the primetime start on a Saturday night at McClimon only adds to the luster of a game worth attending.Wisconsin vs. Nebraska (Football): Besides the opening game of the season against LSU, this is the game most students and Badger fans have circled on their calendar for football season. With the new alignment in the Big Ten after the addition of Rutgers and Maryland, the Badgers and Cornhuskers find themselves together in the West and what could be a yearly matchup for the division crown. There could be a surprise or two in the rest of the West division, but expect this mid-November game at Camp Randall to decide who goes to the Big Ten Championship game. The first game between these two in Madison was one to remember, and that should be the case again come Nov. 15.Wisconsin vs. North Dakota (Men’s Hockey): There’s a saying that goes, “I went to a fight and a hockey game broke out.” In a nutshell, that is the Wisconsin-North Dakota hockey rivalry at its finest. After the teams split from the WCHA this past season, the Badgers made sure to get North Dakota back on the schedule for two games at the Kohl Center — and there should be plenty of physicality and hockey in between. The Badgers will enter the series with an eye on retribution after UND knocked them out in the first round of the NCAA tournament this past spring, and considering the long history between the schools, expect plenty of good hockey both nights and a great atmosphere surrounding the ice. If you’ve never been to a Wisconsin hockey game, this would be a great first taste of how special they are.Wisconsin vs. Duke (Men’s basketball): Duke is a university renowned for not only its academics, but probably more so, its college basketball program under head coach Mike Krzyzewski. The first time the Blue Devils came to town back in 2009, the Badgers handed them their first ever Big Ten-ACC Challenge loss, and the atmosphere was rocking at the Kohl Center. After what happened in only the second-ever meeting between the two teams, don’t expect too many tickets to be available for the Dec. 3 matchup.last_img read more

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