Tata Zest Spotted on Test Launch Soon

first_imgTata Motors’s upcoming sedan Zest has been spied testing in India again, suggesting the imminent launch of the car.Tata Zest, a car which was first showcased at the country’s biggest automobile extravaganza, Delhi Auto Expo in February is expected to make its domestic auto market entry in near future. The car has made numerous appearances on the cyber space through spied images and reports, now the Motoroids has posted the spied images of the car which was seen testing in Pune.Zest, the first sedan in India with Automated Manual Transmission (AMT), will be offered in both petrol and diesel variants. The petrol version of the Zest will be powered by a 1.2 litre, four-cylinder, turbocharged Revotron engine under the hood, which can churn out a power of 85 PS at 5000 RPM and a peak torque of 140Nm 1750-3000 RPM.The diesel model will come with a 1.3 litre Quadrajet motor, which can generate 90 PS power at 4000 RPM and 200Nm torque at 1750-3000 RPM. The car is expected to come with features like new front grille, projector headlamps, steering wheel and dash board.The auto lovers are also expecting the launch of Tata’s premium hatchback Bolt in the country. Bolt will also pack the same 1.2 litre, four-cylinder, turbocharged Revotron engine and the 1.3 litre diesel engine, and will churn out the same power and torque. Bolt was spied testing in India recently. It is speculated to come with a new audio system that features MapMyIndia GPS, touchscreen and voice commands, center console, infotainment system, electric power steering in place of the Vista’s hydraulic unit, projector headlamps and LED tail lamps.Even though Tata is still silent on the launch date and the availability of the Zest and Bolt in the subcontinent market, the company’s exclusive websites for both the cars are live from Monday (24 March).last_img read more

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Black Church Leadership Makes Call to Action at MLK Prayer Breakfast

Black Church Leadership Makes Call to Action at MLK Prayer Breakfast

first_imgThe District’s Shiloh Baptist Church hosted its 27th Annual Martin Luther King Memorial Prayer Breakfast. The Rev. William Barber II, president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP, used the event to call for a new Poor People’s Campaign.In the wake of King’s death in 1968, the Rev. Ralph Abernathy made good on Dr. King’s call for a “Poor People’s Campaign,” bringing about 3,000 people to DC who set up makeshift campsites in the shadows of the Washington Monument.The Rev. William Barber, president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP, issued a call for a new Poor People’s campaign during the King Memorial Prayer Breakfast. (Photo by Hamil R. Harris)“We are doing a multi-year campaign to engage more than 100 million people who sometimes never even hear their name or their condition,” Barber said. “We are dealing with the systemic racism, systemic poverty, ecological devastation, the war economy, and the distorted moral narrative that is promoted by Christian nationalism that is contrary to our deepest Christian values.”During his speech Barber reminded those gathered of how Martin Luther King was very unpopular after he spoke out against the Vietnam War on April 4th, 1967 at the Riverside Church in New York City. “He was killed one year to date after that sermon,” Barber said. “[FBI Director] J Edgar Hoover labeled him as the number one enemy of America and there were others in Black leadership who challenged him.”Shiloh Baptist Church Pastor, the Rev. Doctor Wallace Charles Smith, welcomed Barber to a breakfast that took place on the Saturday morning after the federal government was shut down. The fellowship hall was packed with federal workers, former White House appointees, and veterans of the Civil Rights battles that many thought were won in the 1960s.“This demonstrates that the church is fighting on and we will not give up,” Smith said. “Even though the government is shut down, the church is still open . . .”The Rev. Thomas L. Bowen, minister of Congregational Life at Shiloh and director of Religious Affairs for Mayor Muriel Bowser said,” There has never been a time like this and the stakes are raised.”“We are picking up where Dr. King left off. The dream has to be one that uplifts everyone and we have much more work to do,” said Bowen.Barber, co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign, said during Black History month he will lead a national effort where people will protest in various sites across the country in groups of 2,500. “Fifty years after the Poor People’s Campaign, it is about motor mobilization. It is a launch, we are not commemorating the Poor People’s Campaign, we are reigniting it.”“We need to remember that the real Martin Luther King found himself having to take on a society that had a neurotic sickness and a septic commitment to racism, poverty, and war that was literally destroying the soul of this nation and ripping apart its moral promises,” Barber said. “When Dr. King rendered this diagnosis and committed to raise a Poor People’s Campaign for a moral revolution of values with those who had nothing to lose, he was declared even more an enemy of the state and a threat to the powers that be.”In the same way King became disliked, Barber said, ministers today must be willing to become unpopular if social change is going to come.last_img read more

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Scientists consider the possibility of adding aerosols or modifying clouds to slow

Scientists consider the possibility of adding aerosols or modifying clouds to slow

first_img Governments send representatives to climate meetings hoping to establish a consensus regarding carbon emission reductions, and the citizens of the world debate the source or even reality of global warming and what ought to be done about it. Yet the planet continues to warm. Scientists around the globe are convinced that unless something is done soon, the planet could become a miserable place, or worse, we could cause our own extinction. While some progress has been made in limiting carbon emissions, most would agree such efforts are falling short. For that reason, some scientists have begun looking at other ways to prevent catastrophe. Two of the most debated are aerosol injection and cloud seeding.The idea behind injecting aerosols into the atmosphere, as Niemeier and Tilmes point out, is to mimic the cooling that occurs when volcanoes erupt. Along with smoke, volcanoes also emit a lot of sulfur, which is why scientists suggest we do the same artificially. But that might be easier said than done, Niemeier and Tilmes note, because it would involve replicating an eruption the size of Mount Pinatubo every day for approximately the next century and a half.And there are problems with cloud seeding, too, which might be done to disperse cirrus clouds, preventing them from trapping heat—the main problem is lack of precision; doing it wrong could lead to more warming, for example.For these reasons and many more, Pasztor, Scharf and Schmidt suggest taking a very serious look at how to prevent one country, group or even a wealthy individual from striking out on their own with such approaches. Adding a governing body to the equation, they suggest, could prevent these scenarios. More information: Ulrike Lohmann et al. A cirrus cloud climate dial?, Science (2017). DOI: 10.1126/science.aan3325 Ulrike Niemeier et al. Sulfur injections for a cooler planet, Science (2017). DOI: 10.1126/science.aan3317 Janos Pasztor et al. How to govern geoengineering?, Science (2017). DOI: 10.1126/science.aan6794 (Phys.org)—Scientists looking at alternative approaches to staving off global warming have published two Perspective pieces in the journal Science. In the first, Ulrike Niemeier and Simone Tilmes with the Max Planck Institute and the National Center for Atmospheric Research in the U.S., respectively, address the possibility of injecting aerosols into the atmosphere as a means to limit heat passing through. In the second, Niemeier has paired up with Blaž Gasparini with the Institute of Atmospheric and Climate Science in Switzerland to look at the issues involved with attempting to disperse clouds that prevent heat in the atmosphere from escaping back into space. In an editorial in the same journal issue, Janos Pasztor, Cynthia Scharf and Kai-Uwe Schmidt consider how we might govern geoengineering attempts to prevent a reckless few from possibly destroying the planet they are trying to save. Citation: Scientists consider the possibility of adding aerosols or modifying clouds to slow global warming (2017, July 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-07-scientists-possibility-adding-aerosols-clouds.html Explore further © 2017 Phys.orgcenter_img Journal information: Science Models show injecting aerosols into the atmosphere to prevent hurricanes possibly feasible Credit: CC0 Public Domain This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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