Watch SZA Debuts Garden Video Featuring Donald Glover

Watch SZA Debuts Garden Video Featuring Donald Glover

first_imgNews Watch: SZA, Donald Glover In “Garden” watch-sza-debuts-garden-video-featuring-donald-glover The GRAMMY-nominated R&B singer gets cozy with the “This Is America” singer/songwriter in her latest videoRenée FabianGRAMMYs May 21, 2018 – 12:18 pm Last week SZA teased that a video for “Garden (Say It Like That)” would be coming shortly. And now she’s made good on that promise.”Garden” features not only SZA’s mother, but also “This Is America” singer/songwriter Donald Glover, who plays the video’s love interest. The video shows SZA singing against nature-based backdrops such as the ocean and a forest while pining after Glover’s character.The track is from the R&B singer/songwriter’s 2017 album Ctrl, which earned SZA her first five career GRAMMY nominations for the 60th GRAMMY Awards, including Best Urban Contemporary Album and Best New Artist. Watch: SZA Debuts “Garden” Video Featuring Donald Glover Twitter Email NETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Oct 11, 2017 – 4:44 pm SZA’s “Drew Barrymore” Connection Facebook If you want to catch SZA performing “Garden” and her other hits live, grab your tickets to the upcoming TDE Championship tour, which runs through June 16 and also features Kendrick Lamar,  ScHoolboy Q, Ab-Soul, and Jay Rock, among others.Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs”Read morelast_img read more

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RMLD To Roll Out New Electric Vehicle Pilot Rebate Program On June

RMLD To Roll Out New Electric Vehicle Pilot Rebate Program On June

first_imgREADING, MA — Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) will launch its new electric vehicle (EV) pilot rebate program on June 1, 2018. The pilot is set to run from June 1 through October 31.Electric vehicles offer significant environmental benefits as well as reduced fuel costs for EV owners. RMLD’s new program aims to support the adoption of EVs in our service territory by providing customers rebates for the purchase of 100% electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and EV charging stations. This new program aligns well with RMLD’s ongoing Be Efficient, Get Greener, and Go Paperless initiative.Be on the lookout for the official program announcement on June 1st. For more information on electric vehicles, visit https://pluginamerica.org/why-go-plug-in/.(NOTE: The above announcement is from RMLD.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedRMLD Invites Customers To Attend Free Electric Car Show In Wilmington On September 15In “Community”RMLD To Hold Electric Car Show At Wilmington Farmers Market On September 15In “Community”RMLD Launches Pilot Electric Vehicle Rebate ProgramIn “Government”last_img read more

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VIDEO Watch Families Sing Christmas Carols To Wilmington First Responders

VIDEO Watch Families Sing Christmas Carols To Wilmington First Responders

first_imgWILMINGTOn, MA — Several families visited the Wilmington Public Safety Building on Friday, December 21 to serenade the town’s police officers and firefighters with Christmas carols. Organizers wanted to show support for the sacrifices Wilmington’s public safety officials make throughout the year, especially during the holiday season.Watch a few songs, courtesy of Wilmington Community Television, below:——Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPSA: Wilmington Police Offer Free Child Safety Seat Installs & Inspections Every WednesdayIn “Videos”VIDEO: Learn About The New Wilmington Police Explorers ProgramIn “Videos”Wilmington Police Chief Joe Desmond & Deputy Police Chief Brian Pupa Sworn InIn “Police Log”last_img read more

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Twitter testing feature that will let you hide replies to your tweets

first_img 0 If you ever get frustrated by inane and even toxic replies degrading the value of your tweets, or even hijacking the thread completely, Twitter might have a solution for you.The social networking company on Thursday confirmed it’s developing a “Hide Tweet” feature that lets users protect their conversations by hiding individual replies to tweets. The “Hide Tweet” option was discovered in code for the Twitter Android app by Jane Manchun Wong, who tweeted about her findings on Thursday. “Twitter is testing replies moderation,” Wong tweeted Thursday morning. “It lets you to hide replies under your tweets, while providing an option to show the hidden replies.” The feature could help improve the health and civility of conversations on Twitter, which has come under fire multiple times in recent years for not doing enough to combat harassment on the platform. A study last year even found that the site is a “toxic place” especially for female journalists and politicians.Twitter representatives didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment, but Michelle Yasmeen Haq, a senior program manager at Twitter discussed the new feature this afternoon in a thread on her personal Twitter account.”People who start interesting conversations on Twitter are really important to us, and we want to empower them to make the conversations they start as healthy as possible by giving them some control,” Haq wrote in a tweet explaining the feature.”We already see people trying keep their conversations healthy by using block, mute, and report, but these tools don’t always address the issue,” she said. “With this feature, the person who started a conversation could choose to hide replies to their tweets. The hidden replies would be viewable by others through a menu option.”The feature’s transparency will also allow the community to recognize and call out people who use the feature to hide content they disagree with, she said. Haq said Twitter plans to begin testing the feature in the coming months. Share your voice Twitter is testing replies moderation. It lets you to hide replies under your tweets, while providing an option to show the hidden replies pic.twitter.com/dE19w4TLtp— Jane Manchun Wong (@wongmjane) February 28, 2019 Internet Tech Industry Tags Post a comment Twitterlast_img read more

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Sonic the Hedgehog director promises changes after the internet went insane

first_img Share your voice What will those changes be? Tough to tell. Some artists have come up with their own designs, but the truth is we have no idea at this point.It all seems extremely last minute, and many have commented that making core changes to your main character, when the movie is due in November is going to put a lot of pressure on the folks working on the movie’s CGI. 4 Sonic Movie to be the first videogame movie to faithfully adapt the industry’s horrifying crunch problem https://t.co/xzRqpVY8Hc— ✨ Hamish Ridley-Steele ✨ (@hamishsteele) May 2, 2019 Fans have been criticising the Sonic design since the original poster was leaked last year, so it seems strange that they’ve waited until now to make changes. Also worthy of note: Adult human beings losing their mind on social media because the design of the main character in a movie aimed at children doesn’t meet their nostalgic needs. Completely normal and not strange at all. We deliberately chose a screenshot that doesn’t show his teeth. You’re welcome. Sonic The Hedgehog Twitter/Screenshot by CNET The first trailer for the Sonic the Hedgehog live action movie dropped this week and the reaction was… mixed.Mixed? That might be underselling it. Try “deranged”, “insane”, “tinged with hysteria”. Some people were mad that it wasn’t the Sonic they remembered. Others were angry he had large, well-defined calfs. Mostly people were freaked out about his teeth.Regardless, the reaction wasn’t positive.Director Jeff Fowler has heard the criticism and now, pretty late in the game, he’s promised changes. Worst geek movies of the decade Comments 51 Photos TV and Movies Gaming I want to see the documentary about what the animation and art team on the Sonic the Hedgehog movie has gone through.— Mikey Neumann (@mikeyface) May 2, 2019 Tags Thank you for the support. And the criticism. The message is loud and clear… you aren’t happy with the design & you want changes. It’s going to happen. Everyone at Paramount & Sega are fully committed to making this character the BEST he can be… #sonicmovie #gottafixfast 🔧✌️— Jeff Fowler (@fowltown) May 2, 2019last_img read more

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FCC bans China Mobile from US reviews other Chinese carriers

first_img FCC Donald Trump 2 Comments Share your voice Tags From left to right: Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, Commissioner Michael O’Rielly, Chairman Ajit Pai, Commissioner Brendan Carr and Commissioner Geoffrey Starks FCC The Federal Communications Commission voted Thursday to block China Mobile from providing service in the US and said it’s reviewing the status of other Chinese providers due to national security concerns. In a unanimous 5-0 vote, FCC commissioners rejected a 2011 application from China Mobile USA to provide services for phone calls between the US and other countries. Multiple federal intelligence agencies had urged the agency to reject the request amid concerns that the Chinese-controlled provider would use its access to US communications networks to threaten national security.”China Mobile ultimately is owned and controlled by the Chinese government,” FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, a Republican, said in a statement ahead of the vote. “There is a significant risk that the Chinese government would use China Mobile to conduct activities that would seriously jeopardize the national security, law enforcement, and economic interests of the United States.Republican FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr also called for an investigation into other Chinese service providers that were previously given approval to do business in the US. Carr said the US should take “additional action” and investigate whether to revoke approvals for China Unicom and China Telecom.”Much, if not all, of the reasoning behind today’s decision appears to apply with equal or greater force to those legacy authorizations,” Carr said. “Let’s ensure that our decisions from decades past don’t inadvertently endanger American interests.” Pai said at a press conference following the meeting that the agency is already “looking at” authorizations granted earlier to these carriers. But he declined to say anything more about that process. The denial of China Mobile’s application and the increased scrutiny into the other Chinese-owned carriers represents a significant escalation in a simmering conflict between the US and China over whether to allow American companies to buy Chinese telecommunications gear. It also comes as talks heat up between the White House and Chinese officials this week over tariffs the US has imposed against goods imported from China. President Donald Trump has repeatedly accused China of not playing fair on trade and hurting American companies. The US is expected on Friday to raise tariffs on Chinese imports from 10% to 25%. The Chinese government is expected to retaliate. The Trump administration has already blocked Chinese telecom equipment maker Huawei from selling its gear to American wireless providers, citing security concerns. But US officials have gone further, pressuring other countries around the world to do the same.Security isn’t the only thing troubling US officials when it comes to these Chinese companies. There’s also significant fear around China’s efforts to leap-frog the US technologically. China is seen as a major threat to the US in the race to develop 5G wireless technology, which promises faster speeds and more responsive networks. It’s expected to be the foundation of a slew of advanced technologies like VR and autonomous vehicles. The US was a leader in the development and deployment of 4G LTE technology, and it’s reaped the benefits of that leadership. China is already seen as a leader in developing 5G technology. Neither China Mobile, China Telecom nor China Unicom responded to a request for comment.  Mobilelast_img read more

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Aston Martin DB4 Zagato Continuation requires 4500 hours of work per car

first_img8:32 Now playing: Watch this: 2020 Hyundai Sonata first drive: An attractive and compelling midsize sedan Post a comment Aston Martin DBS Superleggera has gorgeous looks and… Aston Martin Tags Share your voice More From Roadshow 0 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better More about 2019 Aston Martin DBS Superleggera 25 Photos Classic Cars Sports Cars Car Culture Enlarge ImageOld and new processes, married together to create one seriously pretty old-school Aston Martin. Aston Martin Aston Martin’s Continuation series brings old cars back from the dead using traditional manufacturing methods. They’re not street-legal, and they’re wildly expensive, but it’s the only way to have a brand-new vintage Aston Martin on your driveway. The company is currently in the process of building the latest addition to this lineup, and each one requires an awful lot of work.Aston Martin announced on Monday that it has already commenced work on more than half of its upcoming DB4 GT Zagato Continuation lineup. Of the 19 slated for construction, at least 10 are already in various stages of assembly. It’s all taking place at Aston Martin’s Heritage Division headquarters in Newport Pagnell, England.This isn’t the sort of assembly line you’d see at, say, a Ford plant. Instead, it’s more like a highly dedicated workshop, where Aston Martin employees rely on old-school manufacturing methods. There are some modern touches scattered about to help increase safety and other aspects that might not be immediately noticed, but by and large, Aston Martin is trying to stay as true to the DB4 GT Zagato as possible. Each car requires, according to the automaker, about 4,500 hours of work.Under the hood of each DB4 GT Zagato Continuation is a 4.7-liter straight-six engine that’s believed to make more than 390 horsepower. All that motive force hits the rear wheels through a four-speed manual transmission. It packs an FIA-approved roll cage, which is probably necessary, since it’s only legal for track driving. The DB4 GT Zagato Continuation is expected to start reaching 19 lucky owners in the fourth quarter of 2019. It’s a pricey proposition at £6 million (about $7.2 million), but that price is for not one, but two cars — each one is sold alongside a modern take on the car, based on the DBS Superleggera. That car is expected to reach owners about a year after the vintage model does.This isn’t Aston Martin’s first foray into building old cars from scratch in the 21st century. In 2017, it produced a run of non-Zagato DB4 GT cars. The automaker is also working on the Aston Martin Goldfinger DB5 Continuation, a $3.5 million take on one of cinema’s most famous cars — and yes, functional gadgets are included. Preview • 2019 Aston Martin DBS Superleggera: Beast mode Aston Martin 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Check out the build process for the Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato Continuationlast_img read more

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Family suspects Guard scandal at play in pregnant soldiers death

first_imgRandy LaRose says he would give all he has to know why his sister, Alaska National Guard Staff Sgt. Michelle Clark, died.In Part 2 of this story, we look at where various threads of the investigation have dead-ended.For many Alaskans, the scandal at the Alaska National Guard is long over. Top brass lost their jobs after investigations confirmed a toxic work environment that harbored sexual misconduct, even crime.But nothing is resolved for the family mourning Michelle LaRose Clark, a pregnant soldier who died in 2011 of unknown causes. A special state investigator said last summer the death deserves further review. Clark’s family, and a retired officer, can’t let go of the idea that her death is related to what she knew about crime within the Guard.Download AudioClark was 31 years old, in the seventh month of an uneventful pregnancy. She collapsed on the floor at her home in Eagle River. Paramedics tried to resuscitate her. Doctors at Providence continued CPR even as they operated to remove her baby, a girl. Both died that night, Jan. 16, 2011.The state autopsy report lists her cause of death as “undetermined.”“Not having any answers, there’s so much torment in the family,” says her brother, Randy LaRose Jr., of Wasilla. “If it was natural causes, I could accept that. But the fact that the autopsy wasn’t done right, you have to question.”Michelle Clark was pregnant when she died in 2011. (Photo: Facebook)Clark’s family does question, and after five years with no answers, their doubt has hardened into suspicion.They suspect the medical examiner, who did not find a cause of death.They suspect the Anchorage Police of not looking hard enough for answers, and because several of them are also in the Guard.They suspect the lawyers they hired to help them get answers.They suspect Clark’s husband, a pharmacy technician.They suspect murder, but Clark’s brother acknowledges they have no hard evidence.“I’d give everything I had for answers,” he says.Staff Sgt. Michelle Clark (Photo: Facebook)Clark’s older sister, Angela LaRose, of Anchorage, says no one has adequately explained her sister’s death, or the setting when Clark’s husband found her at their condo.“I want to know. Get on the floor, like how my sister was, and show me … Because it just doesn’t make sense,” she says.Clark was staff sergeant in supply at the Alaska Army National Guard, which at the time was teeming with misconduct and mistrust. Clark told a chaplain’s assistant she’d been raped by someone in her chain of command when she and other Alaska Guard members were deployed to Kosovo in 2009. And she told him the perpetrators were committing crimes in Alaska, too. One of the last people she approached was a National Guard officer named Ken Blaylock:“Basically, she stopped me in a hallway and asked if she could talk to me. I said yes. She had tears in her eyes. She said she had personal knowledge of drugs and sexual assaults within her organization. She was afraid of her family. She was afraid of people in her unit. She was afraid of some of her friends. She was afraid for her life and the life of her baby.”Lt. Col. Blaylock, now retired in Palmer, says during that five-minute conversation, Clark worried she’d be seen talking to him. He was at the time something of a clearinghouse for sexual assault victims. Blaylock says he tried to get Clark to talk to police or a chaplain that day, the Friday before Martin Luther King Day, 2011.“I said ‘look, we need to go do this right now,’” Blaylock says. “And I was trying to convince her. And she said: ‘No sir, they’re going to kill me.’”Blaylock says they agreed to talk again Tuesday. But Michelle Clark didn’t survive the weekend.“On Sunday I got a phone call saying that she’d been found dead,” Blaylock recalls.Blaylock was a polarizing figure in the Guard. He got severely crossways with Gen. Tom Katkus and other Guard leaders; Blaylock says because he was trying to address wrong-doing.  He says Guard leaders portrayed him as a nut, but he says his reputation is redeemed by the investigations that confirm the Guard was rife with sexual assaults, reprisals, bullying and favoritism.“Everything else that I pushed, that everyone was calling me psycho on, has now been vindicated and proven to be true,” he said. “So this was just another piece of it. It’s not done yet.”Blaylock is pressing for more investigation.Retired Juneau judge Patricia Collins served as a special state investigator to examine sexual assault and abuse in the Guard, and how the authorities responded. She said in her report last summer that Blaylock may be well-intentioned, and a number of Guard victims put their trust in him, but Collins says she didn’t find evidence to support some of his allegations.Blaylock is still consumed by his suspicions of the Guard and a large constellation of events he believes may be connected to Clark’s death. He talks to Clark’s family, who’ve adopted many of his allegations.  They say he’s a hero for trying to draw attention to her death. Blaylock says he can’t drop it.“Here I am, a commissioned officer in the United State military and I have a pregnant woman come to me telling me that she’s going to be killed, and two days later she’s dead,” he says. “At what point do I let it go?”Blaylock wasn’t the only guardsman Clark confided in on the final Friday of her life. A noncommissioned officer, who spoke on condition of anonymity to avoid reprisals, agreed Clark did seem terrified that day.“She was extremely afraid and extremely nervous. She didn’t want to say anything on the work phone. She didn’t want to say anything in the office where she was. She was extremely nervous and afraid.”The NCO says she urgently wanted to tell him something in private. Based on their prior conversations, he took that mean she wanted to tell him about crimes within the Guard.“There’s people at work she was extremely afraid of,” he says.But unlike Blaylock, the NCO believes it’s more likely Clark died of natural causes, which he thinks could have been aggravated by intense stress.Blaylock says there’s a way to put all his suspicion to rest.“It’s simple: find an actual cause of death. A real one.”Tomorrow, we’ll look into what’s been done to find out why Clark died.last_img read more

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Calista Corporation approves Akilista dividend second shareholder dividend of the year

first_imgCalista Corporation’s board of directors Wednesday approved its second shareholder dividend of the year.According to a Calista press release, the $2.2 million dollar Akilista dividend is a 10 percent jump from last year, and totals out to be $1.67 per share.The Calista Corporation serves around 13,000 shareholders, with the average shareholder owning 100 shares.The fall dividend comes from the corporation’s Akilista [aw-KEE-lis-tuh] investment portfolio, which made its first distribution to shareholders in 2014.Dividends will be distributed on November 21st.So far this year, the corporation has given out $7.8 million dollars in dividends.About 62 percent of Calista Corporation shareholders live in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta region.last_img

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Waiting for winter ice roads mean the North Slope can get to

first_imgA water truck and blade add layers of ice chips and water to an ice road near one of ConocoPhillips’ flow lines on the Western North Slope. (Photo by Elizabeth Harball/Alaska’s Energy Desk)Every winter, a massive infrastructure project takes place on the North Slope — one that’s designed to disappear. Ice roads are built to minimize the oil industry’s footprint on the sensitive tundra, and melt away in spring. Many of the oil industry’s multi-million dollar projects on the North Slope can’t be built until the ice roads are finished each year.Listen nowOn a dim, seven-degree day in January, a van slowly lurches down the beginnings of an ice road on Alaska’s North Slope. Jeff Osborne, who oversees ice road construction for ConocoPhillips, said that the ice under the tires is as thin as one or two inches. It’s really bumpy.“You get used to it,” Osborne said.This tour has been arranged (and paid for) by ConocoPhillips. It’s the only way a reporter can see how the oil company operates in this remote part of the state.Here on the North Slope, oil companies like ConocoPhillips build hundreds of miles of ice roads every winter, at a cost of about about $400,000 per mile. Osborne explained there are no permanent roads to the company’s Alpine facility, or to many of the pipelines nearby.An ice chipper moves across a frozen lake, leaving behind material used to build ice roads. (Photo by Elizabeth Harball/Alaska’s Energy Desk)“That’s the amazing part,” Osborne said. “I don’t know anywhere else in the world where you can build pipelines and when we walk away and everything melts, you can look from the road or from afar and you wonder to yourself, ‘how did those pipelines get placed?’”ConocoPhillips’ North Slope work schedule hinges entirely on ice roads. The season lasts 90 to 100 days. During that narrow window, the Alpine workforce doubles in size. Essential equipment like drill rigs, pipes, cranes and chemicals — too big or dangerous to carry in by plane — all have to be moved on ice roads.On a frozen lake near Alpine, a big yellow Cat moves back and forth across the horizon. What’s left behind looks like a freshly-plowed field — only it’s frosty white. Huge backhoes scoop up ice chips and dump them into trucks.Back at the road site, the ice chips are dumped onto ground that’s been pre-packed with snow.“At some point in time the blade will call the water truck up and have the water truck put some water down on the chips that have just been dumped,” Osborne said.After water is sprayed down, Mother Nature takes charge, freezing everything into place. Layer after layer is added until the road is at least six inches thick.And that’s pretty much it.“I’ve always thought that ice roads were an elegantly simple solution to a problem,” Melissa Head said. She’s with Alaska’s Department of Natural Resources. “There really isn’t much that’s complicated about it and that’s the beauty of it.”Head is on a team that manages ice road construction on the North Slope. The main purpose of ice roads, she explains, is to protect the tundra’s sensitive vegetation — some plants native to the region won’t grow back for years if they’re disturbed.Environmental groups have raised concerns about ice roads. Lois Epstein with the Wilderness Society in Anchorage worries about the amount of water it takes to build them.“Where that water comes from, making sure that it doesn’t deplete important lakes, river systems,” Epstein said.But Epstein added her group doesn’t oppose ice roads.“It is true, ice roads are much better than permanent roads, gravel roads, so we do support their use,” Epstein said.This winter, ConocoPhillips begins construction on its Greater Moose’s Tooth 1 drill site. It’s one of the company’s first big developments in the National Petroleum Reserve. ConocoPhillips usually builds about 35 miles of ice roads each winter, but for this $900-million project, they need an additional 80 miles.That means Jeff Osborne is keeping busy. Driving back to Alpine in the van, I have to wonder if ice road building feels like a Sisyphean task. I ask him how he feels about the money, time and effort he puts into something that just melts away in the spring.“Job security,” Osborne said simply.By late April, the ice roads Osborne completed just a few months earlier will fade back into the tundra. And next year, he’ll start all over again.How is climate change affecting ice road construction?To build an ice road, state regulators require the tundra to be frozen to a set depth and temperature. ConocoPhillips’ Jeff Osborne, who has worked on ice roads since 1998, said he hasn’t noticed the impact of rising temperatures on his work, but state data shows a shift has occurred.According Alaska’s Department of Natural Resources, the length of tundra travel seasons decreased between 1970 and 2000.In the 1970s and 1980s, it was common for tundra travel season to begin as early as November. But by the mid-1990s and early 2000s, tundra travel season was commonly beginning in January. In 2003, the state adopted new technology and techniques, like temperature monitoring stations and pre-packing snow over the tundra.As a result, “ice road season has actually increased quite considerably because of the pre-packing techniques and new vehicles that are being used,” Melissa Head of the Alaska Department of Natural Resources’ Northern Oil and Gas Team said. Head said the state is not studying the long-term effects of a changing climate on ice roads, and does not have data proving the shift was due to climate change.“There was a recognition that the off-road travel season was changing and was decreasing, but no one attributed that to any specific thing,” Head said.According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration average annual temperatures in the Arctic have risen 3.5 C since 1900 and continue to increase at double the rate of the rest of the globe.last_img read more

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