Priority to develop female football in Essequibo

first_img… says executive memberBy Elroy StephneyESSEQUIBO is set to benefit from the resuscitation of female football in the Region. Speaking to Chronicle Sport, executive member of the Guyana Football Federation (GFF) Maxine Stewart, who also serves as an executive member of the Essequibo Football Association (EFA), confirmed that female football will be a priority for the local administration since it is also a mandate from the GFF to develop female football in all regions.She expressed great optimism of having a wide cross section of females being involved in the sport and according to her “the EFA will ensure that the necessary mechanisms are put in place to encourage, support and sustain the drive to have female football thrive in the region”.Ms Stewart further stated that “moves are already in place to form clubs within various districts” while acknowledging “that same was already done in Dartmouth and Henrietta”.The EFA executive disclosed that the concentration will be on training at the Under-17 level with sessions already commencing at the Anna Regina Community Centre (ARCC) ground in the afternoons.GFF and EFA executive member Maxine StewartIt was also revealed that Travis Bowen and Ranzolin Durga, technical directors assigned by GFF, are working with the female players and will generally develop football across the region, including hinterland districts.Meanwhile Stewart, who remains committed towards realising success in football in Essequibo, is appealing to all stakeholders including the Government and Private Sector to cooperate in realising that dream through continued sponsorship, mentorship, better facilities and training opportunities.The veteran administrator remains one of the highly driven individuals in Essequibo whose love and passion for football is unquestionable.In this regard, she was impressed and happy with the large attendance of approximately 65 young footballers who participated in a recently held coaching clinic in Dartmouth.“Essequibo has an abundance of raw talent, and we want to harness them into becoming the final product,” she emphasised.Further, the forthright campaigner was also pleased with the grassroots academy where the GFF and the EFA are partnering to capture talent across the Essequibo Coast and Pomeroon. The players with potentials must be given the opportunity and exposure to be involved in formal training, with prospects towards possible selection in the future.While the sport remains popular, “getting the structure right is what is required in order for our footballers to excel,” Stewart added.In this regard, the champion female football enthusiast is prepared to trot the extra mile to fulfil the dreams of countless footballers in the county, and in particular to give prominence to female football in Essequibo.last_img read more

READ MORE

Radicals, Team Mohamed Bikes invade Giftland Mall

first_imgRACING fans were treated to their first taste of the SR3 Radicals this weekend when Calvin Ming’s car was put on display at the Giftland Mall.Freshly imported from Barbados, the Ming’s Products and Services (MPS) Radical was taken there as part of a build up to the November 11 and 12 event.According to Guyana Motor Racing and Sports Club (GMR&SC) President, Rameez Mohamed, the event also serves to introduce the public to one of the feature events of the day.“The SR3 Radicals are already receiving a great deal of interest from those people whoTeam Mohamed Enterprise’s Bikes (GT Ridez Photo)have never seen the car live before. We think that it was a great idea to have it out here.”“Also, a lot of people have never had the chance to be in the pit before and witness some of the team Mohamed’s Enterprise bikes before, so we’ve got those on display as well.”“We really like the reception we are getting here for this meeting and we anticipate a big turnout. A lot of the big names are coming, Roger Mayers out of Barbados, Franklyn Boodhram out of Trinidad and of course our own Kristian Jeffrey.”Meanwhile, with one week to go, the club has produced a twenty-seven event program which will spread out over two days of racing.The first day, November 11, will see qualification commencing from 10:00hrs with racing action occurring from 14:00hrs. Several of the local groups as well as the first radical demonstration will take place there.The following day, the Sunday, will see the CMRC event as well as several exhibitions, including a professional drifting display by two Trinidadians.On Saturday, tickets will cost $1000 for adults and $500 for kids above 12 years. Children under -12 will be admitted free. On Sunday, adult tickets will cost $2000, kids 18-12, $1000 and kids under-12 free.last_img read more

READ MORE

Boys basketball Lakers beat Phoenix, 52-38

first_img Tags: boys basketballCazenoviaChittenango Though parked just outside the state Class B rankings with an 11-3 record, the Cazenovia boys basketball team is on the short list of title contenders.With a big game looming next Wednesday against its namesakes from Skaneateles after a week’s rest, the Lakers hosted Phoenix last Tuesday at Buckley Gym and, helped by a big third quarter, beat the Firebirds 52-38.Neither team had separated until Cazenovia, leading 26-25 at halftime, proceeded to bash Phoenix in an 18-4 run through that third period, never to get caught.Alex Moesch and Ryan Romagnoli each hit on three 3-pointers as Moesch got 17 points and Romagnoli had 13 points. Keegan Bailey also finished with 13 points as Ty Freyer had six points.Chittenango nearly got its best win of the season last Tuesday against Marcellus, leading for long stretches before the Mustangs rallied late to beat the Bears 62-53.Ignoring its own 3-9 mark, Chittenango steadily built a 31-25 halftime advantage, and still led going into the fourth quarter before Marcellus finally went in front thanks to a well-balanced attack.Bryce Bishop still led all scorers with 17 points, most of it from five 3-pointers. Alex Lum had 12 points, with Tyrus Kelly earning 12 points.But the Mustangs had four players reach double figures as Matt Kershaw,with 16 points, set the pace, Luke Ingianni getting 12 points as Jared Sammon had 11 points and Cory Cangemi 10 points.Those struggles continued on Thursday night as Chittenango fell to Westhill 66-30, never able to get to double-digit points in any single quarter against a much-improved Warriors defense.Kyle Manwaring still earned 11 points overall, but no one else had more than Kelly’s total of five points. On Westhill’s side, Zach Brown had 15 points, with James Kelley getting 14 points and Elliott Rouse adding 10 points.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story last_img read more

READ MORE

Class brings Penny Harvest to local school

first_imgUSC students in POSC 323: “Civic Engagement and Leadership” are making a difference -— one penny at a time.Beginning early this semester, students in political science professor Ann Crigler’s  class aimed to bring Penny Harvest, a program that encourages students to save pennies for community investment, to elementary schools throughout Los Angeles.Penny Harvest, a program within the educational non-profit organization Common Cents, is the largest child philanthropy program in the United States. Since the program’s inception in 1991, children between the ages of four and 14 have been collecting pennies and turning them into grants for their communities — the sum of which now total approximately $8.1 million.It was through the efforts of the students in POSC 323 that Penny Harvest was able to make its way to the West Coast. According to Vanessa Villanueva, a junior majoring in political science and a teaching assistant for the class, the goal for the class has been to replicate the successes that Penny Harvest has enjoyed on the East Coast.“What we’re trying to do is make that same program in New York and bring it over here,” Villanueva said.The students in the class split into four committees: funding, communication, partnership and evaluations. Each committee was in charge of various aspects of implementing the program into local schools ranging from fundraising to grant research.Sacred Heart, a K-8 charter school in Los Angeles, was the first school at which the USC students were able to implement the program. Students from the class were able to visit the school and introduce the program to the children.Olivia Diamond, a junior majoring in public relations, said bringing a program like Penny Harvest across the country to Los Angeles was an exciting experience.“It was really unique to get to start a nonprofit in Los Angeles that already exists in New York but hasn’t yet been brought to the West Coast,” Diamond said. “They’ve done it in some other cities, but it’s cool to start it in such a big metropolitan area.”The children taking part in the Penny Harvest program were given the task of collecting pennies from their local communities and then deciding where they would like to best allocate their funds. To Villanueva, Penny Harvest’s primary goal is to teach youth about community engagement and basic investment skills.“What’s great about the Penny Harvest program is that it teaches kids that what they have to do is that they have to research the community around them to see which organizations they want to give the money they raise to,” Villanueva said. “They interview people from homeless shelters and that sort of thing to see who they want the money to go to.”Vanessa Estrada, a senior majoring in communications, sees the primary goal of the class as to emphasizing the pivotal role that youth can play in civic engagement.“The goal of Penny Harvest isn’t just raising money,” Estrada said. “What makes it different from any other fundraiser is that … it’s student run. The students decide and vote on where to give the money so we’re giving the students the tools to decide.”One of the main challenges the class faced was implementing the program into schools within the Los Angeles Unified School District.“There was supposed to be another charter school and some LAUSD schools,” Villanueva said. “But we probably won’t start until next semester because of bureaucracy concerning LAUSD. Right now, it’s just Sacred Heart.”Though bypassing bureaucratic hurdles was a challenge for the pilot program, Diamond said it was not an impossible feat.“It was hard at first because, for example, LAUSD made it difficult to get into the public schools fast enough for it to work this year,” Diamond said. “But we have got into a charter school and we started a mini Penny Harvest on the USC campus to kind of get the ball rolling this year.”The group that participated in “Mini Harvest” -— where the group sought pennies from students in residence halls -— raised $362.33, with residents in Webb Tower raising the most funds.One of the main takeaways of the project, according to Villanueva, is that youth can have an impact on their communities, regardless of their age.“Not only does it teach the kids to be more aware of their community, but it also empowers them to help their community,” Villanueva said. “It teaches that kids are not a burden to society, but rather they are an asset to society and that’s the great thing about this program.”Looking to the future, the class hopes to expand the program throughout Los Angeles and pass on what they’ve learned to civic engagement classes to follow.“Hopefully we’re going to try to get the communities around the schools we are working in to know so that everyone sees how interesting and unique it is to get these kids so civically engaged at a young age,” Diamond said.The group plans to expand the program to five schools next semester.last_img read more

READ MORE

USC researchers working on diverse genome data

first_imgUSC researchers are working to change how genomic data used for studying disease has been skewed to reflect white people. USC researchers in the Department of Translational Genomics are working with the Los Angeles County + USC Medical Center toward more representative genome data.According to USC researchers in the Department of Translational Genomics, diversity among different racial and ethnic groups lies not only in culture, but also in genetic backgrounds. Because of this, certain illnesses disproportionately affect specific ethnic groups or demographics. Additionally, with language barriers and the lack of health care available to some ethnic minority groups, these populations have been more prone to these diseases. As a result, researchers are working with the Los Angeles County + USC Medical Center to attain a complete array of samples from Los Angeles’ population. “LAC’s collaboration with USC empowers researchers to study a clinical problem with accessibility to samples that are more representative of the population,” USC assistant professor Zarko Manojlovic told USC News. Manojlovic is the director of the USC Keck Genetic Platform,  which gives researchers at the University the ability to use DNA sequencing to provide answers to specific questions in research, according to USC News. The research team can use this platform for genomic research to process samples containing highly degraded nucleic acid species. Equipped with the NovaSeq sequencer, genomic studies can be performed faster and at a lower cost. “Between these capabilities and our in-house infrastructure, KGP will deliver a large reduction in cost,” Manojlovic told USC News. “This will let USC researchers ask more questions, to better understand and treat diseases.” KGP is one of many steps needed in order to properly attend to patients of all demographics, researchers said. Researchers will need to expand their studies to biomedical informatics, sample processing, computational infrastructure and expertise in data sets. “We will be able to answer questions that will have clinical impact across a true representation of the majority of the U.S. population,” John Carpten, director of the Institute of Translational Genomics, told USC News. “KGP will serve as the platform to help USC become the leading researching institute in the nation, and in the future of medicine.”last_img read more

READ MORE

Syracuse maintains ‘DNA,’ recovers after sloppy defensive start in 14-10 win over Johns Hopkins

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Comments Drake Porter walked 15 yards out of the net and looked right and left. “For a first-year starter,” Syracuse head coach John Desko said, Porter has brought a poised approach to many of those situations. He flagged a midfielder on the left side, and cradled. The ball popped from his pocket.But nobody came — Porter was alone. He scooped the ball and lifted his head. After the season-opener, where the Orange were dominated in possession, SU identified two problems that led a possession struggle: ground balls and clears. Porter was stout in the net, but defenders and the junior starting his first game action sometimes threw the ball away up the field. He improved, and the Orange did too.But Saturday, he was “anxious,” Desko said. He walked two more steps and fired the ball to the midfielder he saw open just seconds earlier. The Blue Jays countered with an interception. Porter turned, and bolted back to the net to stop Johns Hopkins, to stop the game from tumbling to disaster.In an eventual 14-10 win over the No. 18 Blue Jays (2-3), the No. 14 Orange (3-2, 0-1 Atlantic coast) nearly unraveled as a result from sloppy plays on the defensive side of the field. Misfires on clears, second-chances in front of the net and ground ball mishandlings from Syracuse propelled Johns Hopkins to an early lead, only to be flipped by a negation of those mistakes. The Orange, who repeatedly push from one end of the field to the other, were nearly undone by its transition-heavy style.“It’s in our DNA as players: we like to push the ball,” defensive midfielder Peter Dearth said. “Our whole defensive unit, we all feel capable…”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe Orange have long focused on their ability to maintain possession. It has been the reason behind many of its triumphs in the early part of the season, and their failure has exposed its worst stretches. Coming into the game, Johns Hopkins knew it needed to attack, goalkeeper Ryan Darby said. From the early part of the game, Blue Jays head coach Dave Pietramala said his team “pressed” with both its offensive and defensive unit.With a couple early wins on the faceoff, JHU went on a run and grabbed an early 5-1 lead. During the run, Porter’s saves found Johns Hopkins for second chances and the Orange frequently lost scrambles for ground balls in front of the net. Rather than sailing line drive shots to the right, left or above the cage, Johns Hopkins attack Kyle Marr said the Blue Jays aimed more frequently for Porter’s body. Though many of their early shots misfired, rebounds and resets gave the Blue Jays second-chances that — early in the game — it converted.When the possession leaned Syracuse’s way, the Orange tried to take advantage with plays in transition. Tyson Bomberry tried to cradle through multiple groups of Johns Hopkins defenders. He muscled through two defenders at the midline, but 10 yards later the ball popped out of his stick after two more JHU defenders trapped him on the sideline.Between mishandled passes on the offensive end and a few goals to gather a rhythm before the end of the first frame, Syracuse’s chances came at a premium. After a faceoff win, Jared Fernandez leapt and spun to pass the ball to midfield, but his pass found no one. Two quarters later, as the Orange tried to find room to push ahead, Bomberry’s pass fired wide to fellow-defender Nick Mellen on the sideline as the two athletic long poles tried to lead a break of their own.With the game tied at eight, Marcus Cunningham got a stick on a pass and knocked the ball to the ground. He scooped the ground ball, but it was popped out of his pocket and tumbled in the direction of the goal. The Blue Jays took advantage, and tallied a go-ahead score.Porter struggled to cradle the ball, midfielders and defenders struggled to pass the ball and the Syracuse struggled to string together multiple possessions.“I don’t know if it’s the tightness coming out,” Desko said of the sloppy play. “We’re 2-2, and we really wanted to get the win here in the Carrier Dome.”Johns Hopkins looked for inverts and defensive slides. In the first half, they got them. They sliced through Syracuse’s defense, fired once, and then fired again. The third quarter was “sloppy for both teams,” Pietramala said. But in the fourth quarter, Syracuse flipped the momentum.To counter free-flowing play in front of the net, the Orange ran a lot of zone defense, Desko said. The same plays that would give Johns Hopkins free space in the beginning of the game, Syracuse pushed another player up to bump out the Blue Jays attack. On multiple plays, Porter sprinted out of the net and pushed his stick forward on an attack by the crease. The offensive player, not expecting Porter’s hit, lost his balance and was forced to reset as Porter clamped back between the posts.The Orange ran Brett Kennedy and Jared Fernandez on the wings for the faceoffs, and SU dominated on ground balls, finishing with a 29-23 advantage after the first quarter.“11-2 in the fourth quarter on ground balls,” Pietramala said. “That says it all.”As Johns Hopkins “sat back” in the fourth, the Orange pushed forward. The Blue Jays knew the game plan — the one they had been practicing all week and the one that they perfected for most of the first half — to beat the Orange and force mistakes. But, in the fourth quarter, Syracuse took control, and JHU lost focus.Up two goals near the end of the fourth quarter, earlier sloppy play didn’t stop the Orange from going back to what it does best. Kennedy sprinted from the defensive end off a pass from Bomberry. The right sideline was open, and Kennedy attacked.“It was open,” Kennedy said, “… Why not just let it go?”Kennedy stopped, wound back and fired. After a game of back and forth play, the Orange didn’t let go of the style that’s in their “DNA.” And, finally, it worked.center_img Published on March 9, 2019 at 6:09 pm Contact Michael: mmcclear@syr.edu | @MikeJMcClearylast_img read more

READ MORE

3 takeaways from Syracuse’s 84-71 win over Boston College

first_imgCHESTNUT HILL, Ma. — Syracuse (17-13, 10-9 Atlantic Coast) outlasted Boston College’s (13-17, 7-12) 3-point shooting and won, 84-71, Tuesday night in the Conte Forum. After four losses in six games, the Orange rode Elijah Hughes’ hot hand and swept the season series against the Eagles.Here are some takeaways from SU’s penultimate regular-season contest.Elijah, Elijah, ElijahThe crowd gasped, Hughes smiled and BC head coach Jim Christian called a timeout. There were just over 14 minutes left in the second half, and Hughes had crossed-over, stepped back and launched. He scored his fifth- and sixth-straight points and secured the Orange win in the process.Hughes opened Syracuse’s scoring with a highlight alley-oop, and he didn’t stop there. The redshirt-junior totaled his most points since Dec. 7 at Georgia Tech (33 points), going 11-for-20 from the field for 28.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTwo nights after he went 5-for-16 against North Carolina, Hughes said he needed to make both mental and technical shooting adjustments. And playing against one of the worst defenses in the conference, Hughes was able to generate easy looks. No one Eagles defender could stop him as he constantly drew cheers from a crowd sprinkled with orange.Threes, pleaseWhen the Eagles visited the Carrier Dome on Jan. 15, they missed their first 18 3-pointers, eventually finishing with six. Within 16 minutes on Tuesday night, they had reached that mark. They eclipsed it four minutes into the second half, too.BC took advantage of a discombobulated SU defense, with orange jerseys commonly overloading one side and allowing an Eagle to find space along the wing. Freshman guard Julian Rishwain sunk two, and so did Jay Heath. After one breakdown, SU head coach Jim Boeheim walked up the court and feigned two punches.In the second half, Buddy Boeheim and Joe Girard III collapsed on a guard atop the key, and a quick pass to Derryck Thornton cut the SU lead to seven points. Boeheim quickly called a timeout, yelling at his son as he approached the huddle. Syracuse’s defense tightened inside but kept allowing deep balls. Boston College finished 19-of-42 from 3 as the space open in the first half dissipated in the second.Size mattersWith 6:48 seconds left in the second half, Bourama Sidibe jumped for a rebound and dunked through contact. A fan in a blue Syracuse cap sitting courtside stood up and flexed. Sidibe posted 12 rebounds and nine points, continuing his dominant-stretch ahead of the ACC tournament.Sidibe’s success inside was evocative of a larger-trend for the Orange on Tuesday night. They converted only 7 3s, scoring an overwhelming-majority of their buckets inside the arc, finishing with 28 points in the paint. The Eagles switched on nearly every possession in the first half and SU seized the mismatch. Marek Dolezaj registered six attempts, backing down his defender whenever he noticed a guard switched onto him. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 3, 2020 at 9:11 pm Contact Nick: nialvare@syr.edu | @nick_a_alvarezlast_img read more

READ MORE

Algeria Neutralised Our Wing Play, Says Rohr

first_imgGernot Rohr Super Eagles Head Coach Gernot Rohr admitted that the tactics employed by Algeria Head Coach Djamel Belmadi proved to be enough to neutralise his pacy wingers Ahmed Musa and Samuel Chukwueze.Speaking at the post match shortly after the Desert Foxes had snatched the ticket to the final to confront Senegal on Friday, Rohr revealed that the intensity of pressing by the Algerian players restricted the Eagles from getting into their rhythm. Both Baghdad Bounedjah and Riyad Mahrez gave Kenneth Omeruo, Wilfred Ndidi and William Troost-Ekong a tough time.”Algeria had a better pressing than us especially in the first half and in the midfield they had some very good situations and we had problems in the back of our defensive midfielders. They could have some opportunities,” Rohr stressed. ”The centre forward from Algeria (Bounedjah) gave a lot of problems to our centre backs and we could not find our wingers like we did the other day against South Africa.”Today (Sunday) they could not give crosses and come on the side, I think they were well organised against us and we could not find a solution because the pressing was very strong,” recalled the Eagles Franco-German gaffer.Rohr reiterated that the Super Eagles played better in the second half but the young midfielders still have room for improvement.”It was better in the second half, we had some shots on target, we were unlucky to concede an own goal (by Troost-Ekong).”I congratulate my players for this big fight against a very good team, we knew the tournament is becoming more and more difficult and today in the last minute they (Algeria) won it, and they deserve it.Rohr however admitted that Eagles have a lot of work to do if they must raise their game to be counted amongst the best in the continent.”We have to work much more, we are young. Our midfield is the youngest one with Ndidi, Etebo and Iwobi. They have to learn tactically, they have to make better communication better,” observed Rohr.In their last 2019 Africa Cup of Nations fixture, the Super Eagles will face Tunisia in the third place play-off on Wednesday, July 17.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

READ MORE

AUDIO: Joy Sports/BBC two way series

first_imgListen to Joy Sports George Addo Jnr and BBC’s Lee James discuss the weekend’s Premier League games. Who joins Aston Villa in the dreaded relegation.http://https://soundcloud.com/gajnr/joysportsbbc-epl-surf-6th-may-2016 –Follow Joy Sports on Twitter: @JoySportsGH. Our hashtag is #JoySportslast_img

READ MORE