Lighting A Scene Solely With Practicals

first_imgDo you know other practical lighting tips? Let us know in the comments. Looking to save money on your next project? Learn how to light a scene solely with practical lights for a dramatic (and affordable) look.A practical light is an actual working light that appears in a scene. This can be a household lamp, a TV, candles, Christmas lights, or any number of other light sources, and in this guide, we will look at lighting an interior scene solely with practical lights — which will cost you no more than $30. This approach is perfect if you’re in a pinch and can’t access your lighting setup or if you are part of a project improvising scenes as you go.Before we jump fully into the tutorial, let’s have a look at a scene. The scene doesn’t rely only on household practicals, but they feature prominently. I want to emphasize the importance of three-dimensional space when solely using practical lighting because, as I said, they’re not ideal for fully illuminating an actor like a Fresnel kit or something similar.However, when you can separate layers of the composition with practical lighting, it can create a much more interesting dynamic. At the top of the previous image, we see flat space — there is essentially just one surface plane. The shot wasn’t coming together, but we didn’t have the space to bring the sofa forward make it work in this room. Therefore, we moved this shot into the kitchen, as you can see in the bottom image, where we created compositional depth along the z-axis. The result is much more aesthetically pleasing, and the household lights work great.This is crucial when you’re lighting solely with practicals. Give the image breathing room, and your final lighting setup will improve. In the perfect circumstance with proper lights, we would aim for something like the following:We have a 1×1 softbox behind us, a very small Fresnel just off to the side, and a practical in the background. This is how you can make the best use of a practical light. If we wanted to enhance the mood, we could remove the softbox light, and just keep the Fresnel as our key.The difference between the Fresnel and household lamp as our key light is that because it’s a hard light, the Fresnel creates a much more defined texture, which I think works better than the soft light from the lamp. We could, in theory, remove the lamp shade and create a hard light, but we would have no way to control the intensity without proper film tools, and this is a tutorial on how to light without them.I’m going to use just three household lamps. If you have a directional lamp, that can helps direct light to a particular area.Since practical lighting isn’t going to give you the full range of illumination that any working film light would give you, you want to work within your limitations. This is such an important tip. Work with shadows, don’t try to light the entire scene, and don’t turn on the room’s main lights. You want to remove as much light as possible instead of adding to it. There’s only going to be so much leeway with a practical light until the image turns nasty and starts to look like a home video.So, we’re going to work with a low-key, chiaroscuro lighting setup. We have a lamp to the left of the subject, which will be our key.Then, we will position our second practical lamp in the background for some background lighting. The cut-outs in the lampshade also lend texture to the wall.Then, we will use a non-diffused lamp to create a rim light, which will look as if it’s coming from the background practical. This separates our actor from the background.To see the final result, check out the video tutorial above.The key points to remember when lighting a scene solely with practical lamps.Work with your limitations, and don’t try to overextend.Move away from flat space to make your image more aesthetically pleasing.Work in a low-key setup — don’t try to illuminate the entire set with practicals.Try to work with practicals that share a similar color temperature.last_img read more

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Report: Real Madrid 3 APOEL 0

first_imgReal Madrid 3 APOEL 0: Returning Ronaldo at the double as champions cruise Matt Dorman Last updated 2 years ago 04:42 14/9/2017 Cristiano Ronaldo - cropped Getty Images Cristiano Ronaldo was at the double as Real Madrid started their Champions League defence with a 3-0 win over APOEL. Cristiano Ronaldo put his domestic frustration behind him by scoring a brace on his Real Madrid return as Los Blancos began their quest for a third straight Champions League title with a routine 3-0 win over APOEL.The Portugal superstar is still serving the remainder of a five-match ban in Spain for pushing the referee in the Supercopa de Espana, but Ronaldo made up for lost time by once again proving the difference at the Santiago Bernabeu.Zinedine Zidane’s side, without Karim Benzema due to a thigh injury, have been held to a pair of draws in their two LaLiga fixtures at home this season, but Ronaldo ensured there was little chance of a repeat against the Cypriot outfit. Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘I’m getting better’ – Can Man Utd flop Fred save his Old Trafford career? Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing The Champions League’s all-time leading goalscorer netted the first in the 12th minute and put the result beyond doubt with a second-half penalty, his 107th goal in the competition.Sergio Ramos’ exquisite bicycle kick capped an untroubled victory and eased any lingering tension from the league stalemates.With the 4-1 thrashing of Juventus in last season’s final still fresh in the memory, Madrid undoubtedly remain the team to beat in a strong Group H.12 – Cristiano Ronaldo has scored 12 goals for Real Madrid with his last 16 shots on target (all competitions). Monster. pic.twitter.com/seqU81niQ5— OptaJose (@OptaJose) September 13, 2017Ronaldo wasted little time in getting back on the scoresheet, announcing his return with the opener inside 12 minutes.Spain star Isco led a quick counter-attack down the left and linked up with Gareth Bale, who supplied a superb low cross for Ronaldo to clinically fire home at the far post.Wales winger Bale looked for a repeat assist shortly after, but Ronaldo this time headed the aerial delivery around the post from a narrow angle.It was not all good news for Zidane early, though, as Mateo Kovacic was forced off with a leg complaint after 25 minutes, the Croatian replaced by Toni Kroos in midfield.The hosts continued to monopolise possession throughout the half without managing to pile the pressure on APOEL, who set up camp on the edge of the area and were content to have conceded just a single shot on target by the interval.Ronaldo looked destined to double his tally within seconds of the restart only to see his volley from Dani Carvajal’s cross come back off the woodwork, with suggestions that the ball crossed the line waved away by the referee.He only had to wait a matter of moments to instead make it 2-0 from the penalty spot, firing low to Boy Waterman’s right after APOEL defender Roberto Lago was punished for a handball in the area.The Portugal captain was soon denied claims for a second penalty as Zidane’s side looked to put the contest to bed as quickly as possible.Ramos ensured they did just that in eye-catching fashion just after the hour, drifting forward and producing an athletic bicycle kick from Bale’s deflected header across goal.APOEL goalkeeper Waterman did his best to keep the deficit down by denying Ronaldo a second at close-range, but by that stage the champions were well and truly on their way to the top of Group H.Substitute Borja Mayoral looked to have made it 4-0 in the final minute of stoppage time, only for Ronaldo to have been ruled offside for his role in the build-up.Madrid’s next European assignment is a trip to face Peter Bosz’s Dortmund, while APOEL will host Tottenham in Nicosia. read morelast_img read more

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ESPN’s Paul Finebaum Crushes Nick Saban For New Coaching Hire

first_imgPaul Finebaum explains why Clemson will lose.ESPN college football analyst Paul Finebaum is crushing Nick Saban for his latest coaching move with the Alabama program.AL.com reported earlier today that Saban had brought in fired Maryland head coach D.J. Durkin for a consulting role this week.Matt Zenitz has more details:Former Maryland head coach D.J. Durkin, fired in October after a lengthy investigation into the death of one of his players, has resurfaced at Alabama.In his first foray back into football since his October firing, Durkin has been helping Alabama this past week in a consultant-like capacity, sources told AL.com. It’s unclear at this point if Durkin could have a long-term role on Nick Saban’s Alabama staff though, according to sources.Durkin, of course, was fired by Maryland in October following an investigation into the program, prompted by the death of a player.Finebaum isn’t happy with Alabama’s decision.“I think it is an absolutely terrible, embarrassing look for Nick Saban,” he said.”I think it is an absolutely terrible, embarrassing look for Nick Saban.” – @Finebaum, on reports of ex-Maryland coach DJ Durkin consulting at Alabama. pic.twitter.com/Y6tj4IZhhT— Outside The Lines (@OTLonESPN) December 13, 2018Alabama is currently getting ready to face Oklahoma in the College Football Playoff.The Crimson Tide and the Sooners are set to kick off at 8 p.m. E.T. on Dec. 29.last_img read more

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Talking Beef with RoastMaster General Jeff Ross

first_imgFor as long as guys have been hanging out, they’ve been beefing over who’s stronger, faster and better looking. In honor of this age-old tradition, Slim Jim has teamed up with Comedy Central’s RoastMaster General, Jeff Ross, for their new Settle the Beef campaign. I called up Ross to get the low down on his own history with ‘beef’, his favorite roasts, his prison special, upcoming projects, and some tips on how to roast your own family and friends.I know you grew up on the mean streets of New Jersey. So, given Jersey’s reputation, I was wondering if you could tell us a little bit more about your own history with ‘beef.’ What kind of beef did you get into when you were coming up there? Any particularly memorable beefs? How did you settle them? I imagine you did a little proto-roasting?I think if you’ve ever been to New Jersey, everybody there thinks they’re a comedian. Everybody there has an opinion. It’s the place that brought you everything from Frank Sinatra to the Sopranos. So beefs are a very Jersey tribal thing. You always have to be prepared to defend yourself verbally and always be in the middle of an argument. I’m in Jersey right now, as a matter of fact, and I always have my guard up.So you never got into any physical beefs? Was it always a war of words?No, actually, I started out as a kid in Newark where my mom dragged me against my will to karate school because I was just a skinny little runt. There was always a kid bigger than me with a bigger mouth. So, learning Karate gave me the confidence to talk smack for a living later in life. No one was going to mess with me.Growing up did you ever have any idea this is what you’d be doing comedy and roasting for a living?It was a self-defense mechanism. Being able to take a joke and dish it out. It happened organically. It wasn’t even until I left New Jersey and went to college in Massachusetts that I realized I was funny. Because everybody in my family was funny and my friends were funny. Jersey was funny.We’re always the butt of a joke. We’re always sort of like New York’s goofy cousin. It took a while to realize this was my path. I never wanted to be a comedian. It was just a happy accident.You’ve roasted everyone from Flavor Flav to Bob Sagat to Justin Bieber. Do you have a favorite roast in particular? I always say [my favorite roast is] whoever is next because of the prep. Going to battle is so much fun. I just started on the next one—we’re roasting Rob Lowe on Labor Day weekend on Comedy Central—so now I’m starting to hang up pictures of Rob Lowe all over the place. I bought his autobiography and I’m watching his movies. I’ve been trying out jokes on friends and in the comedy clubs. So the favorite roast is always the one in front of me, rarely behind me. Because I always tell myself to enjoy the process. It’s not just the night of the roast, it’s all the build-up and all the hype and the writing that I love so much. That having been said, roasting Justin Bieber was pretty fucking great.I like how you mentioned you do a lot of research on your subjects. This ties into when you’re on stage and actually doing the roasting: are all the jokes and insults pre-written and you’ve got a plan in mind or does some of it just come out off the cuff? Because it does seem like sometimes the funniest jokes are those that appear to be spur-of-the-moment.Thank you. You know, it’s almost like planned chaos. I write and write and write and really plan what I want to say, but inevitably stuff happens.  But also inevitably, I go on late. I go on last. So I get to roast the roast. I get to comment on the people who went on before me. It all becomes part of my routine. And by the way, talk about settling beefs, if someone takes a real shot at me that I didn’t expect, I have all that time waiting to come back and retort. So yeah, a lot of beefs get settled right here on the dais at the roast. It’s like a live sporting event.So you have the advantage. You’re like the meta-roaster. You get to roast the whole process. And then I get to go on right before the guest of honor gets their response. So I get the last punch before he or she comes back. Their last licks. I like having the sweet spot right there.You’ve also roasted Donald trump in the past. I have to ask about that because of the current situation.Somebody told me he was running for president.I heard that too! The way I see it, roasts are almost a tacit approval of the roastee. You’re sort of poking fun at them, but at the same time accepting them as a member of the celebrity culture and society that we live in. I’m wondering if, at this point in time looking back, do you regret doing that or are you proud of the fact that you roasted a guy who would eventually go on to become a candidate for the presidency of the United States?It’s such an interesting question and my opinions on it are still evolving all the time. I’ve roasted Trump twice. Plus I roasted him at a private party at Mara Lago, his resort. His own home turf. I roasted him initially as a New York icon and a reality show star.So, I feel like if he gets into office, I’ll have a chance to roast him as president. Hopefully he’ll have me at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner. And if he gets into office, me as the RoastMaster General, I have a good shot of getting bumped up to a cabinet level spot. So I have to bite my tongue and not say anything bad because you know he’s going to be like, “Jeff, I need five insults about North Korea by three o’clock.”“And if you do it, I’ll make you secretary of defense.”Of offense, secretary of OFFENSE. But, talk about settling the beef! I’m really looking forward to the Hillary/Trump debates. I feel like those two are going to make roast history.Stepping back from the Political arena, what if I wanted to roast my family, or coworkers or friends? What sort of tips do you have to get started and to really dig into them?Really do your research. Like I’m doing with Rob Lowe. Reading his books, watching his movies. That’s key. I feel like the times I’ve been disappointed in myself have been when I tried to just go after an easy joke that you could say about anybody. But when a joke is specific, that can only be told by you to that person—but everybody still gets it–I think that’s when you have gold.As far as roasting your family: make sure they’re into it. Don’t just walk up to somebody and start roasting them. Their liable to write you out of the will or kick you out of the family. Roasting is all about volunteers. I never roast anyone who doesn’t volunteer for it, otherwise you can really have some hurt feelings and make enemies and get killed.So, there’s no beef when permission to be roasted has been given?Well, one time I started making fun of Suge Knight on Jimmy Kimmel live and he didn’t volunteer for that. I just felt like doing it. I definitely was worried he was going to kill me. And he even drove up to me once at a club and pretended like he was going to shoot me. Definitely scared the heck out of me.Especially since he’s in jail on murder charges! Yeah. So, definitely volunteers only!So that leads me to your Prison Special. You roasted some pretty scary looking criminals in there. While there, did you encounter any real life beef or the settling of beef? There was a lot of weird stuff going on in that jail. Talk about beef. I roasted guys with swastika tattoos. Full on skinheads and Nazis. So that beef goes back to WWII. Some beefs never get settled [Ross is of Jewish heritage and was born Jeffrey Ross Lifschultz]. But, it’s “revenge through ridicule,” as Mel Brooks used to say. You may not be able to get the Nazis back, but you can definitely belittle and ridicule them. That’s kind of what I was going for at that moment.But, I feel like, in the case of the prison, the beef was with the solitary confinement and the death penalty and minimum drug sentence laws—the stuff I got to bring up in that show. The stuff we beef about all the time. I don’t try to take a side, I try to balance it and expose things for what they actually are and let people make their own conclusions. So part of it is shining a light on what people beef about.In this case, it’s beef against the system in general. We’re seeing that more and more with Black Lives matter and the growing awareness of police brutality against African-Americans.Wait till you see the next one coming up on September 10th. My next special is roasting the cops. Jeff Ross Roasts the Police on Comedy Central. That’s going to be the sequel to the jail.In case you’re not familiar with our site, The Manual is a men’s lifestyle guide and we do fashion, food, cars, and more. I figure you’re not really one of the guys into fashion, so I’d like to ask you some questions about food and drink. All my fashion styles are related to food! In other words, I always wear pants that you can easily unbutton during a big meal and I always wear shirts the color of condiments in case I spill anything on myself. It’s one of the reasons I eat beef jerky. You can’t get it on yourself. It just goes right inside you. Where everything else I eat winds up all over me.Straight from the hand to mouth with the Slim Jim, for sure. Do you cook at all? No, I’m on the road so much that I rarely get to cook. I grew up in a family of caterers and I do love food and I do love cooking and feeding people, but I hate cleaning up. Now I reach for quicker foods. Another reason I eat Slim Jim. Someone told me eating them is like peeling a meat banana.So, do you have a favorite beer? I’m more of a tequila or scotch guy, but when I drink beer, to be honest, I’m an all American dude. I’ll go for Miller, Miller Light, Budweiser. I keep it simple. I like it in a can and like it ice cold. And with a hot dog. But the one thing I always do with beer is, if I’m in a different part of the country or a different part of the world, inevitably I’ll ask for a beer made locally. I always love to try beers from different places. The bartenders are usually very proud of what they have from their local brewers. I always recommend you try the local beers wherever you are when you’re traveling.Do you have a favorite piece of tech that you own? TV, phone? I’ve been getting into the Instagram on my iPhone. The Instagram snap stories. It’s kind of addictive. I always feel so much pressure to be funny on Twitter, but on Instagram you can literally point the camera at anything and people think it’s cool. It’s just so stupid and fun. 4,000 views for some dumb shit for no reason.Also, I’m not that technologically oriented. For me a big deal is having a phone charger in every room. That’s like the new pick up line for the modern man. It used to be like, “Come check out my beach house,” but now it’s like, “Hey, I have a phone charger.” And girls are always like “Ooh.”Be sure to follow Ross on Twitter at @therealjeffreyross and check out his feed tonight from 8-9pm EST for his #settlethebeef chat with fans, brought to you by @slimjim.Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons NASCAR Driver Brad Keselowski on Crashing, Winning, and Creating a Legacy SNL’s Kyle Mooney Never Had a Real Job and He’s Cool With That Zach Klein Is the Reason We’re All Obsessed with Cabin Porn Editors’ Recommendations On the Road with Mikah Meyer, the First Person to Visit Every National Park Site in One Trip The Barbershop Renaissance and Men’s Grooming Revolution, According to Fellow Barber’s Sam Buffalast_img read more

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Grimaldi Orders Three More PCTCs in China

first_imgzoom Italian shipowner Grimaldi Group has signed an USD 165 million agreement for the construction of three Pure Car Truck Carriers (PCTCs) with the Chinese shipyard Yinling, following the last month’s USD 300 million order of five PCTCs at the Yangfan shipyard, local media reports.The contract includes an option for a fourth vessel. The three new PCTCs will be capable of transporting 6,700 vehicles and will be used on routes linking the Mediterranean with North America. The said Grimaldi routes are particularly dedicated to shipping of Fiats and Chryslers.The newbuilds, ordered as part of the company’s ambitious fleet expansion and rejuvenation plan, are expected to be delivered by 2017.The current backlog of the shipping group also includes the delivery of two RoRo ships by the end of the year, being built under a contract for six units with Korean shipyards, all aimed at the group’s connections between Europe and West Africa.Moreover, by 2016 the company’s subsidiary Atlantic Container Line (ACL) is slated to take delivery of five RoRo ships with a carrying capacity of 3,800 TEUs, 28,900 square meters of rolling cargo and 1,307 cars, the biggest Con-Ro of their kind in the world.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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Government Moves to Protect Independent Power Producers

first_imgThe province is changing its renewable electricity regulation, a move that will protect the green power projects of independent power producers. Energy Minister Bill Estabrooks said today, Oct. 9, a number of projects faced possible cancellation if the government did not change the deadline for its renewable energy regulation. The deadline has been moved from Dec. 31, 2010 to Dec. 31, 2011. By moving the deadline to 2011, Mr. Estabrooks expects more wind projects to be built at prices that represent good value for Nova Scotians. “The year-long global credit crisis has delayed wind power projects in this province,” said Mr. Estabrooks. “The change reflects the reality on the ground.” He said the new deadline will help ensure the survival of several projects. “We want and need more green energy. This change means more wind power projects on the ground and means that we are closer to our goal of 25 per cent renewable electricity by 2015.” The amended renewable energy standard regulation, available at www.gov.ns.ca/energy/renewables/renewable-energy-standard/ ,moves the target for five per cent of electricity from post 2001 sources to come from independent power producers of low-impact renewable energy sources in Nova Scotia from 2010 to 2011. The regulation for 2013, for an additional five per cent renewable electricity, is not changed. By 2013, a minimum of 18.5 per cent of Nova Scotia’s electricity will be generated from renewable sources. “This change helps our company by giving us the flexibility and confidence to meet our deadlines,” said Barry Zwicker, president of ScotianWindFields. “I am confident that this move will help other independent power producers. We are supportive of government’s commitment to green energy in Nova Scotia.” Interested parties are meeting over the next few months to determine how that target will be met. The consultation process is being led by David Wheeler of Dalhousie University. Mr. Estabrooks said many options are being discussed by Mr. Wheeler and others. He said he expects there will be advice on the role for community-based renewable electricity projects and a system to make them more economically attractive. “We need to be aggressive and forward thinking as we put together our strategy to reach our goal of 25 per cent renewable electricity by 2015,” said Mr. Estabrooks.last_img read more

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UN experts alarmed over atrocities in Sudans Southern Kordofan region

“We are gravely concerned by what appears to be strong evidence that atrocities are being carried out right now in Southern Kordofan and credible reports that civilians as well as combatants are being killed and targeted for gross and widespread human rights violations by Sudanese Government forces,” said Gay McDougall, the Independent Expert on minority issues. Last week Ivan Šimonovic, Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, said the UN has received “very disturbing” reports recently from Southern Kordofan that include indiscriminate aerial attacks, shelling, abductions, extrajudicial killings and mass graves in fighting between Government forces and members of the Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA). Recent media reports said that as many as 100 civilians are buried in mass graves.Ms. McDougall said “worrying reports indicate that persons particularly of Nuban descent have been targeted and killed in incidents that, if they are proved, may constitute war crimes and crimes against humanity by those who have planned and perpetrated such acts.”“A thorough and independent investigation is required with free and unfettered access to the region,” she said. Jeremy Sarkin, Chair-Rapporteur of the Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances, said that “under no circumstances should enforced disappearances be allowed or tolerated.” El Hadji Malick Sow, Chair-Rapporteur of the Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, called for “an independent and comprehensive investigation [to] be conducted on the massive arrests carried out during the last months of political and civil society activists.” The UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, (OHCHR), which released the experts’ comments, said “reports suggest that Nuban and dark-skinned people of Southern Kordofan face killings, arbitrary arrest and detentions, disappearances, abductions, attacks on churches and aerial bombardment.”Southern Kordofan lies in Sudan but borders the newly independent South Sudan. The Nubans have reportedly faced exclusion, marginalization and discriminatory practices that have resulted in their opposition to the Sudanese Government and their support for the SPLA, OHCHR said.The mandate of the UN peacekeeping mission in Sudan came to an end after South Sudan became independent on 9 July. The Security Council created a UN Mission in the Republic of South Sudan (UNMISS), but the new mission does not have a mandate to operate in Sudan.Valerie Amos, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs, said last week that the Sudanese Government has repeatedly denied the UN access to the area since the skirmishes began early last month. Ms. McDougall and the other rapporteurs are independent, unpaid specialists reporting to the Human Rights Council in Geneva. 22 July 2011United Nations human rights experts today expressed alarm over reports of mass killings in the Southern Kordofan region of Sudan, appealed for an immediate cessation of the violence and called for an urgent investigation. read more

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WeWork CEO stepping aside amid questions about company

NEW YORK — WeWork CEO Adam Neumann is stepping aside amid questions about the company’s finances.The New York-based office sharing company said Neumann will remain on its board as non-executive chairman. WeWork’s Artie Minson, formerly co-president and chief financial officer, and Sebastian Gunningham, formerly vice chairman, will become joint CEOs of the company.Skepticism about WeWork’s business model has mounted in recent weeks after it delayed a planned initial public offering. The company’s revenue has risen sharply, reaching $1.8 billion in 2018. But its losses have mounted almost as quickly, reaching $1.6 billion last year.WeWork has office space in 111 cities worldwide.The Associated Press

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Five UN peace missions in West Africa to meet in Senegal on

The fifth meeting of Special Representatives of the Secretary-General (SRSGs) will be chaired by UNOWA head Ahmedou Ould-Abdallah.Expected to attend are Albert Tévoédjré of the UN Operation in Côte d’Ivoire (UNOCI), Jacques Paul Klein of the UN Mission in Liberia (UNMIL), Daudi Ngelautwa Mwakawago of the UN Mission in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL) and Mariama Gamatié-Bayard of the UN Peace-building Support Office in Guinea Bissau (UNOGBIS).Included in their discussions will be the regional dimensions of the simmering conflict in northern Côte d’Ivoire and in the Guinean province of Guinea-Forestière.Mr. Ould-Abdallah’s deputy, Ahmed Rhazaoui, will chair a parallel meeting of experts and representatives of national disarmament commissions, the humanitarian community and civil society, which will hold in-depth discussions of regional Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration (DDR) programmes and policies. read more

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Norwegian celebrities lose battle for wedding privacy in European court

first_imgTHE EUROPEAN COURT of Human Rights has found that Norway did not violate a celebrity couple’s right to a private life.Lars Lillo-Stenberg and Andrine Sæther are well-known in the Scandanavian country – him as a singer, her as an actress. The pair married on 20 August 2005 in a ceremony on an islet in the Oslo fjord.Although the ceremony was ‘private’, the public has permanent and unfettered access to the chosen fjord. A photographer gained access to the area and, with a long-lens camera, took images of the celebration.Subsequently – but without the couple’s consent – a national, weekly magazine called Se og Hor published a two-page spread about the wedding. Accompanying the report were six photographs which showed the bride, her father and the bridesmaids arriving in a small rowing boat. They also depicted the bride approaching the groom and the newly-weds returning to the mainland on foot by crossing the lake on stepping stones.The couple sued the magazine in the Norwegian courts and won compensation. However, the Supreme Court overturned the ruling on 2 September 2008. In their judgement, the presiding judges noted that Sæther and Lillo-Stenberg had married in a place which was accessible to the public and that the article was neither offensive or negative.The ECtHR agreed and found yesterday that there had been no violation of Article 8 which outlines a citizen’s right to respect for private and family life because of the Supreme Court ruling.A lawyer for the couple told local media that they were disappointed with the result.We were curious about what the pair were famous for so here is Lars doing his thing: (YouTube: putt50)And Andrine…(YouTube: kinofilme)last_img read more

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Jennifer Maguire and Bernard OShea confirmed as new 2FM breakfast hosts

first_imgRTE 2FM HAVE officially confirmed the line-up for their new revamped breakfast show.Republic of Telly’s Jennifer Maguire and Bernard O’Shea will present the show alongside Keith Walsh, formerly part of Joe & Keith on Phantom 105.2′s own breakfast offering.The trio will be taking over from Hector Ó hEochagáin, who announced his departure in December.2FM made the widely anticipated announcement in this series of tweets: Maguire and O’Shea had been widely touted as the likely hosts of the new show, while it was revealed on DailyEdge.ie last Friday that Walsh would be joining them.However, RTÉ had not officially confirmed the lineup until now.The new roster is part of a major reshuffle at the national broadcaster’s second station, with a full new schedule expected to be announced in the coming weeks.Keith of ‘Joe & Keith’ fame is third member of new 2FM breakfast team>last_img read more

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BlackBerry PlayBook OS 2 enters beta with Android app support BBM and

first_imgIf you’ve been waiting for something really cool to try out on your recently-discounted BlackBerry PlayBook, here’s your chance. RIM has just taken the wraps off PlayBook OS 2, and the beta is now available for download.The release was announced at DevCon in San Francisco and is obviously aimed at developers, but intrepid PlayBook owners who want to sample the many new features before the update goes official can take it for a spin, too. Among the major additions are the “missing apps” — like an email client, calendar, and BBM.There’s also the Android App Player, which utilizes RIM’s Android Runtime for BlackBerry to run re-packaged apps originally developed for Google’s mobile OS. RIM’s prescribed method is for developers to run their Android apps through a converter first and then upload the signed packages to AppWorld. That means you won’t be installing Android Apps on your PlayBook directly from the Android Market or Amazon AppStore.You can, however, sideload Android apps fairly easily — N4bb offers an excellent rundown of the process.PlayBook OS 2 brings loads more changes to the platform, and they’re squarely aimed at making the BlackBerry slate an easier target for developers. Adobe Air 3 and Flash 11 are supported, Open GL ES 2.0 and Open AL are baked in, and RIM’s Native SDK –which brings support for C/C++ apps — has been certified for release as well. RIM is also snuggling up to standards-based apps built using web code like HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, and even WebGL with the introduction of WebWorks and a much-improved browser.There’s no way this and a handful of free apps is going to make the world forget about RIM’s numerous stumbles this year, but it’s a step in the right direction. And at least the PlayBook — which has always been a capable, powerful tablet — is getting an OS that is more on par with its hardware.More at Engadgetlast_img read more

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La SNCF lance son nouveau site internet

first_imgLa SNCF lance son nouveau site internetFrance – La SNCF annonce l’ouverture de son nouveau site internet. Répondant à plusieurs critiques du gouvernement et du grand public, cette nouveauté devrait permettre à la société d’améliorer son image.La veille du week-end de Pentecôte encore, le site subissait une anomalie rendant l’espace réservations et consultation des horaires indisponible. De quoi provoquer une fois de plus la colère des voyageurs. Le gouvernement, de son côté, demandait davantage de lisibilité dans l’affichage des prix des billets sur la Toile. Le nouveau site voyages-sncf.com, arrivé le 1er juin, est donc porteur de nombreux espoirs en matière d’amélioration de la qualité du service. Désormais, un tableau des tarifs est affiché, permettant de simplifier les recherches des clients : “On donne encore plus de repères mais on n’a pas modifié l’offre de prix” explique la SNCF. Une partie du site est réservée aux espaces de communication tels qu’un forum ou la radio SNCF. Le tout doit moderniser une image sur le Web quelque peu écornée.Le 2 juin 2010 à 12:01 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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Injuries reported in multivehicle crash on Highway 14 in Washougal

first_imgFour ambulances responded to an accident in Washougal involving multiple vehicles.The accident was reported at about 11:50 a.m. at the intersection of Highway 14 and 32nd Street.There were several injuries reported. They appear to be minor, said Trooper Ryan Tanner, a Washington State Patrol spokesman.Traffic was rerouted around the crash on the shoulders of the road until about 1 p.m. when the scene was cleared, Tanner said.last_img

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Trump denies preelection contact with Russia

Trump denies preelection contact with Russia

first_imgPhoto: Reuters US president Donald Trump insisted Thursday that neither he nor his campaign team had contacts with Russian officials in the run-up to last year’s US election, contradicting an explosive report which he blasted as “fake news.”Trump also defended Michael Flynn, the national security advisor whose resignation he demanded and received this week, saying Flynn “wasn’t wrong” for holding pre-inauguration phone calls with the Russian ambassador about US sanctions policy.Instead, Trump accused members of US intelligence agencies of breaking the law by leaking information about the calls.The new president, in the midst of a turbulent week of back-and-forth accusations about contacts with Russia and his battle with the intelligence community, addressed the concerns during an extraordinary White House press conference.Asked whether he or anyone on his staff had engaged in contacts with Russia prior to the election, Trump proclaimed: “No, nobody that I know of.”“I have nothing to do with Russia,” Trump said. “The whole Russia thing is a ruse.”It was a full-throated denunciation of a bombshell report by the New York Times which said intercepted calls and phone records show Trump aides were in repeated contact with Russian intelligence officials well before the US elections.“It’s all fake news,” Trump said, unleashing verbal assaults on the media.Trump stressed that the Times story centered instead on inappropriate action by US intelligence agencies, as he stepped up earlier Thursday attacks in which he vowed to catch “low-life leakers” of potentially classified information that led to the ouster of his national security advisor.Jeopardy “Those are criminal leaks” by people angry about Democrat Hillary Clinton’s loss, he told reporters, as he revealed he has asked the Justice Department to investigate the disclosures.“The people that gave out the information to the press should be ashamed of themselves.”The Washington Post meanwhile reported that current and former US officials said Flynn denied to FBI agents that he had discussed US sanctions on Russia with Moscow’s ambassador.Should it turn out that he discussed the sanctions, as Trump appears to believe he did, Flynn could be in legal jeopardy because lying to the FBI is a felony.“What he did wasn’t wrong,” Trump stressed.“I didn’t direct him” to discuss sanctions with Russia’s envoy, Trump added. “But I would have directed him because that’s his job” to talk with foreign contacts.Late Thursday Flynn’s replacement was still undetermined after former navy admiral Robert Harward, who Trump had reportedly tapped for the job, declined it, US media said.In his wide-ranging presser Trump defended his political agenda, and said that next week he will introduce an amended version of the much-criticized travel ban now caught up in court.He also pledged that new trade deals were coming that would stop countries from “taking advantage of us,” and said he would “show great heart” in dealing with undocumented immigrants who arrived as children and are protected from deportation.But the crux of his remarks centered on Russia connections.“I would love to be able to get along with Russia,” he insisted. “It would be much easier for me to be tough on Russia, but then we’re not going to make a deal.”The latest salvoes came amid reports that Trump plans to name New York billionaire Stephen Feinberg—who has no national security experience—to lead a sweeping review of US intelligence agencies, raising fears of a bid to curtail their independence.Trump had pointed the finger at the National Security Agency, which conducts electronic surveillance, and the FBI, which handles counter-intelligence probes, as possible sources of the leaks.The drumbeat of revelations has infuriated Democrats and alarmed Republican leaders, wary of Trump’s overtures toward Russia.“It is a cloud over the White House,” said Republican Senator Lindsey Graham, who has called for in-depth investigations.‘Collusion?’ Amid mounting calls for more sweeping congressional investigations, one Democrat openly accused Trump’s campaign of improper contacts with Russia.“I believe there was collusion,” House Democrat Maxine Waters told CNN, stressing that Trump’s focus on the leaks was a distraction.Trump’s stance on leaks has flipped since last year’s campaign when he proclaimed “I love WikiLeaks”—the organization that published hacked Clinton campaign emails.He also dismissed as a “joke” his suggestion that Russia was behind the damaging leaks.By January, US intelligence had concluded that those leaks were part of a wider campaign ordered by President Vladimir Putin to try to tilt the election in Trump’s favor. Moscow denies any involvement.Meanwhile, the Trump administration has moved gingerly on Russia, sending top officials to Europe to reassure NATO allies while making its opening official contacts with the Russians.Secretary of State Rex Tillerson met with Russian counterpart Sergei Lavrov in Bonn, and said Washington is prepared to work with Russia “when we can find practical areas of cooperation.”In Brussels, Defense Secretary James Mattis said the Pentagon was not ready “right now” for military cooperation with Moscow “but our political leaders will engage and try to find common ground.”last_img read more

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Widow of Chinese Nobel dissident Xiaobo arrives in Berlin

Widow of Chinese Nobel dissident Xiaobo arrives in Berlin

first_imgChinese dissident and writer Liao Yiwu, waits for Liu Xia (unseen), the widow of Chinese Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, as she arrives at Tegel Airport in Berlin on 10 July 2018. Photo: AFPLiu Xia, the widow of Chinese Nobel dissident Liu Xiaobo, arrived in Germany Tuesday after she was released from years of de facto house arrest in China.Despite facing no charges, the 57-year-old poet had endured heavy restrictions on her movements since 2010 when her husband won the Nobel Peace Prize-an award that infuriated Beijing.After being allowed to leave China, Liu flew via Helsinki to Berlin, where she arrived just days before the first anniversary of her husband’s death from liver cancer.Berlin-based dissident Liao Yiwu and German Nobel laureate Herta Mueller were among a dozen people waiting to greet her at the airport, shouting out her name from the viewing terrace as she emerged from the aircraft.But Liu immediately boarded a black van parked on the airfield tarmac and was whisked away without making any remarks.Liao had earlier voiced his joy on Twitter, saying: “I am so, so, so happy! Finally, finally, Xia is coming today!!”Liu had become a cause celebre and was seen as a test case for China’s attitude to human rights, with activists and foreign powers urging Beijing to allow her to leave the country.Her husband Liu Xiaobo, a veteran of the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests, died last year of liver cancer while serving an 11-year sentence for “subversion”.In an emotional phone call with Liao recently, Liu said, “They should add a line to the constitution: ‘Loving Liu Xiaobo is a serious crime-it’s a life sentence’.”With Beijing’s rights record in the spotlight, a court in central China sentenced another prominent Chinese political campaigner to 13 years in jail for “subversion”, just hours after Liu Xia left the country.Qin Yongmin, 64, was first jailed as a “counter-revolutionary” from 1981-1989 and has already spent a total of 22 years in prison.‘Very severe’ depression -Close friend Ye Du, speaking to AFP before Liu’s departure, said she was suffering from “very severe” depression, adding she would “sometimes faint” and was taking medicine to sleep.Another friend who has spoken to her several times said she was in “bad shape, physically and psychologically”.She was finally given a passport last week, this friend, who did not wish to be named, told AFP.“I hope Liu Xia can find some personal peace and restore her health in Germany,” said UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, who called her fate in recent years “nothing short of tragic”.Chinese authorities had consistently maintained Liu was free but imposed severe restrictions on her movement and kept her under constant surveillance.In May, several foreign diplomats who tried to visit Liu at her apartment amid concerns over her health were denied access.Hua Chunying, a Chinese foreign ministry spokeswoman, said Liu’s travel to Germany for medical treatment was “of her own free will”.US State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert welcomed the decision to release Liu “from house arrest” and allow her to leave China “as she long wished”.“We urge China to release all prisoners of conscience and respect the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all,” she said on Twitter.Patrick Poon from Amnesty International said it was “really wonderful” that Liu was finally allowed to leave.But he voiced concern for her brother Liu Hui who remains in China and said she “might not be able to speak much for fear of her brother’s safety”.In Hong Kong, pro-democracy activists celebrated at a memorial to Liu Xiaobo adorned with the couple’s pictures.“I’m in a sea of joy,” said veteran activist “Long Hair” Leung Kwok-hung as he drank a toast to her.‘Petty, cruel and vindictive’ -At Liu’s Beijing apartment building on Tuesday, two men guarded the entrance and questioned anyone who came near while at least two others patrolled the park outside.But despite heavy security, AFP gained access to her apartment on Monday and saw little sign she was preparing for an imminent departure. Liu declined to give a formal interview, citing fears for her younger brother.Pictures of the couple in happier times lined the walls.Liu’s departure came during a visit by Chinese Premier Li Keqiang to Berlin, where he met German Chancellor Angela Merkel, although a Chinese foreign ministry spokeswoman denied any “association or link between this incident and the visit”.Merkel has spoken out frequently on Chinese human rights abuses and is believed to have pushed for Liu’s release during her May visit to Beijing, where she met the wives of detained human rights lawyers.Analysts, however, pointed to the upcoming anniversary of Liu’s husband’s death as a reason for the timing.“Perhaps the Chinese government realised that as the anniversary of Liu Xiaobo’s death approaches, keeping his widow under house arrest simply shows the Chinese to be petty, cruel and vindictive-not the image it’s trying to project to the world,” said Elaine Pearson from Human Rights Watch.Others said Beijing might be trying to curry favour with Western powers ahead of an EU-China summit next week, as China needs Europe in the trade battle with the United States.A Western diplomat said: “It has to do with China’s image at a time when it is fighting a trade war with the United States.”“China needs to let some steam off and it is conducting a charm offensive targeted at the rest of the world.”This however does not herald an improvement in human rights, this diplomat said, adding that on the contrary, “we can see it is getting worse”.last_img read more

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Full Show Citgos Future And Asylum Seekers Without Attorneys July 31 2019

Full Show Citgos Future And Asylum Seekers Without Attorneys July 31 2019

first_imgListen X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /44:21center_img On Wednesday’s Houston Matters: Houston-based oil refiner Citgo Petroleum could be auctioned off to the highest bidder after an appellate court ruling this week. We learn why it’s happening and what it could mean both for the company’s local employees and the companies they do business with.And we learn how difficult it is for asylum seekers in Mexico to secure an attorney as they wait for their day in immigration court.Also this hour: We discuss the takeaways from the latest Democratic presidential debate, we learn about a settlement in the bail reform lawsuit against Harris County, and we discuss other stories in our weekly political roundup.Plus, the Galveston Historical Foundation has released its annual list of endangered buildings in need of restoration.And members of the Houston synth-pop duo Space Kiddettes perform a couple songs. This article is part of the Houston Matters podcast Sharelast_img read more

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Event Teaches Baltimore City Girls to Help Save the Environment

Event Teaches Baltimore City Girls to Help Save the Environment

first_imgNiya Bell, 11 and Imani Motley, 12A group of women and girls gathered at Morgan State University on June 6 to talk, in part, about the fate of the planet’s food supply. The women were all scientists and environmental experts. The girls were Baltimore City residents. It was all part of a workshop series called Inform and Inspire. The girls were to learn about the animals that help make it easier for many of the foods humans eat to grow – pollinators.Even though humans need pollinators, the animals are at risk because of pollution and climate change. “I think you don’t realize how much food comes to us due to pollinators,” said Daffny Pitchford, of the Potomac River National Wildlife Refuge Complex. Pitchford, who was one of the event’s speakers, said that without pollinators we wouldn’t have foods like strawberries or chocolate. She said she wanted to impress on the girls that there are things they can do right now to save the fate of animals like bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds.Daffny Pitchford, Dr. Mamie Parker, Sophia Blake, Imani Motley, Niya Bell, lady unknown.“There are different types of things one might do to make sure that their habitat is optimal to support all types of pollinators.” She brought with her bags of wildflower seeds that the girls could spread to create a food source for pollinators.Tylar Greene, public affairs with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Association, said she relishes the opportunity to teach young people about nature. “As a public affairs specialist, my role is to focus on urban areas,” she said. A New York City native, Greene said she didn’t start discovering the great outdoors until college. She said programs like the one held Saturday give the next generation the jump-start she didn’t have. She also said that even for girls in the heart of the city, nature is closer than they might think. “They can do things right in their communities,” she said.Dr. Mamie Parker, a fish and wildlife biologist and one of the event’s workshop leaders, described the day’s activities as “wild STEAM.” That is – events that focused on science, technology, engineering, arts, and math but with a focus on nature and wildlife.In addition to the bags of wildflowers the girls took home, stations were set up to teach attendees about butterflies and fish.The event got off to a late start because a marathon elsewhere in the city snarled traffic for many attendees. A little after the event’s 9 a.m. start time, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake’s daughter Sophia was in attendance, as were 11-year-old Niya Bell and 12-year old Imani Motley.“I wanted to get out of the house and do something that would excite me,” said Imani. As an athlete, she’s out in nature a lot. She attended the event to learn more about it.The event was hosted by The Black Women’s Agenda Inc. The group is a non-profit that focusses on the needs of black women and their families. This is one of a series of Inform and Inspire workshops The Black Woman’s Agenda is holding in cities all over the United States.last_img read more

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VIDEO ASRT Legislative Efforts to Require Radiology Technologist Licensing

VIDEO ASRT Legislative Efforts to Require Radiology Technologist Licensing

first_img Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology View all 220 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Recent Videos View all 606 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) President Melissa Jackowski, Ed.D., R.T.(R)(M), FASRT, explains efforts by the society to have states implement licensure laws to ensure that only highly qualified RTs perform medical imaging procedures. She spoke at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Find more SCCT news and videos Conference Coverage View all 396 items Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports View all 9 items Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Women’s Health View all 62 items RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. ASRT Legislative Efforts to Require Radiology Technologist LicensingVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 10:16Loaded: 1.62%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -10:16 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Find more news and videos from AAPM. Videos | Radiology Business | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: ASRT Legislative Efforts to Require Radiology Technologist Licensing Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference.center_img Find more news and videos from AAPM. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

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Venezuelas Chávez in very delicate condition

first_imgNo related posts. CARACAS, Venezuela – Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez is suffering from a “new and severe” infection that has worsened his breathing as he undergoes intensive chemotherapy, the government said late Monday.The announcement came two weeks after Chávez, 58, checked into a Caracas military hospital following two months of treatment in Cuba, where he underwent his fourth round of cancer surgery since June 2011.“Currently, he has a new, and severe infection,” Information Minister Ernesto Villegas said in a statement read from the hospital, adding that there was a “worsening of respiratory function.”Villegas reiterated that Chávez was undergoing “intensive chemotherapy, as well as complementary treatments” and that his “condition continues to be very delicate.”“Comandante Chávez continues to cling to Christ and life, conscious of the difficulties that he is facing and strictly following the program designed by the medical team,” the minister said.The government revealed for the first time on Friday that Chávez began receiving a tough new round of chemotherapy in Cuba after a respiratory infection had improved in January and decided to continue the treatment in Caracas.The firebrand leader stealthily returned to the capital on Feb. 18, with a message on his Twitter account sent in the dead of night.Chávez has not come out or spoken in public in almost three months, fueling speculation about his health that has angered his government. Officials only released a set of photos showing him in his Havana hospital bed, smiling with two daughters on Feb. 15, three days before his homecoming.The government has sent mixed messages about his condition, saying last week that he was still suffering from respiratory problems before declaring the next day that he had presided over a five-hour meeting with aides.Then Vice President Nicolás Maduro, his chosen successor, disclosed the chemotherapy treatment late Friday, before saying the next day that Chávez was still sending instructions about political and economic policies.Maduro said Chávez was communicating by writing and other “creative” ways because a tracheal tube, which is assisting his breathing, was hindering his speech. He said the president was “in good spirits” while fighting for his life.Hundreds of people joined an opposition-led march Sunday demanding that the government reveal more details about the condition of the president of this South American nation which sits atop the world’s largest proven oil reserves.The government has never disclosed the exact nature, location and severity of the cancer, only that it was in the pelvic region.The opposition has accused the government of lying about the president’s health, doubting that he could have held an hours-long policy meeting.Maduro and other senior officials lashed out at the opposition and rumors that the president may be dead, saying it was part of a campaign to destabilize the nation.In power for 14 years, Chávez was re-elected to a six-year term in October but was unable to attend his Jan. 10 inauguration.Before he left for Cuba in December, he designated Maduro as his political heir and urged Venezuelans to vote for him if he is unable to resume his duties. The constitution says elections must be held within 30 days if the president becomes incapacitated. Facebook Commentslast_img read more

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