Man’s body found in elderly woman’s freezer could have been there for 11 years

first_imgiStock(TOOELE CITY, Utah) — The body of a man found in a freezer in a dead woman’s home may have been there for as long as 11 years.The grisly discovery happened last week when police were doing a routine welfare check on a 75-year-old woman named Jeanne Souron-Mathers that had not been seen for about two weeks. When police gained access to her home they discovered her deceased on her bed.“That is kind of what started all this,” said Tooele City Police sergeant Jeremy Hansen to ABC News’ affiliate station KTVX.Officers began processing the scene of the woman’s death but when they looked into a deep freezer they found an adult male deceased inside the freezer.“Foul play is suspected. Both bodies were taken to the medical examiner’s office for autopsy. There was no trauma, visible trauma, on the female,” said Hansen. “We are still waiting for the medical examiner’s report and the autopsy to be done on the male and that way we can find out if there is any trauma or anything like that to his body and try to figure out how he died.”Police later identified the man to be her husband Paul Edward Mathers but during the course of their initial investigation they received multiple varying reports from neighbors about when he was last seen.“Well, that is kind of our problem right now,” said Hansen. “The detectives talked to several other people at the apartment complex that lived in the different apartments and they did recall seeing a male at the apartment but every time they asked, the time frame was different. So that is why we are suspecting anywhere from a year and a half to 11 years … We truly don’t know at this point how long he had been in the freezer.”Foul play is expected in her Paul Edward Mathers’ death but the death of Jeanne Souron-Mathers is not considered suspicious. The investigation is ongoing.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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COLILLA, CATHERINE ANNE

first_imgA funeral mass took place April 7 at St. Matthews Church, Ridgefield, for Catherine Anne Colilla, 57, North Bergen and formerly of Jersey City. She passed away April 2. She was born to the late Patrick Spatucci and Anne Wentzel. Because of her love for people Catherine made her career as a server and hostess at the Coach House Diner in North Bergen. During her 30 years of working at the Coach House, Catherine touched the lives of many people. With her beautiful smile, caregiving attitude, and hard work ethic, she attracted and acquired many regular customers. In 1986 she married Peter Colilla and gave birth to two beautiful daughters, Samantha and Sidney. Catherine loved spending time with her family and took yearly family trips to the Jersey shore and Malibu Dude Ranch. Catherine was predeceased in 2004, by her longtime companion Allen Trautz and in 2014 by her godson David McGlyn. She will be greatly missed by her daughters Samantha Winslow and Sidney Collila; her grandchildren David and Jacob; her siblings Joseph, Patrick, and Peggy Spatucci; her best friend Alice Frega, goddaughters Megan, Angela and godson Damien and many nieces, nephews and friends.Services arranged by the Riotto Funeral Home, Jersey City.last_img read more

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“Life Pieces to Masterpieces” exhibit

first_imgThroughout April, the Gutman Library’s first-floor gallery space was home to a collection of collaboratively created works by underprivileged African American youths. The “Life Pieces to Masterpieces” exhibit, comprising 29 pieces, touched on subject matters ranging from Cirque du Soleil to absent fathers to Mitt Romney. (View full slideshow on the Library Portal.)The artists, ages 3 to 25, live in some of Washington, D.C.’s most volatile and poverty-stricken neighborhoods. The works are created as part of a curriculum developed by Life Pieces to Masterpieces, a nonprofit whose primary aim is to improve the young men and boys’ emotional awareness and academic and professional achievements through their proprietary art-based character education program.The works are just a happy byproduct. “I don’t view them as art, I view them as life experiences,” says Selvon Waldron, deputy director of Life Pieces to Masterpieces. “Our young men are very honored to be showing at Harvard.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Cervelli addresses repeal of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the third story in a four-part series examining the effects of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and its potential repeal at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s. Today’s story highlights the support the Saint Mary’s administration has demonstrated for DACA and undocumented students at the College.Last November, students assembled in Le Mans Hall to distribute signs with messages of support for their undocumented peers. Saint Mary’s president Jan Cervelli asked for a sign to put in her car.When a panel discussion before Thanksgiving offered her the opportunity to address how post-election tensions might influence underrepresented groups, Cervelli did not hesitate to speak.When community members hosted an open forum last April after the College decided not to declare itself a sanctuary campus, she was there. The recently announced decision end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program represents another opportunity for Cervelli to stand up for affected members of the Saint Mary’s community. And she’s taking it.“We’re living in a diverse world — increasingly so,” Cervelli said. “[DACA students] bring to us very important perspectives, and our doors are completely open. We are committed to protecting those students in every way that we possibly can.”Cervelli explained that the College exemplifies values of selflessness and resourcefulness in the face of adversity.“We’re honoring all of our financial aid commitments to those students, and I can say that the Saint Mary’s community has really stepped up as well,” she said. “We have … experts at immigration law, and they are providing — at no cost — legal advice to any DACA student who so chooses. I’m very pleased about that.”Welcoming vulnerable populations and celebrating their contributions allows Saint Mary’s to meet the expectations its founders had, Cervelli said.“Particularly with the Sisters of the Holy Cross, one of their primary tenants is hospitality, which means more than providing meals and such,” she said. “It means opening doors to all, and particularly to refugees.”Cervelli said the College rejects discrimination and judgment, and promotes unity and curiosity.“I think [acceptance] is a key to excellence in education here,” she said. “Being able to understand different perspectives, being able to embrace those, is key to being able to function in any respect — both professionally and personally — upon graduation.”The appointment of Cristal Brisco as college counsel, moves to diversify the faculty and staff hires and the administration’s desire to collaborate more regularly with Student Government Association (SGA) will establish an unbreakable sisterhood, Cervelli said.“It is our obligation, and we’re very much committed at this point in time, to create a more inclusive and diverse campus,” she said. “We’re taking specific steps in that direction, I’m happy to say.”The influence a small college can have should not be underestimated, Cervelli said.“I think the president speaks on behalf of the institution and has to have a critical voice — not only on the campus to reinstate our values and what are principles are — but in the community as well: to bring the voice of Saint Mary’s to both the regional and national stage,” she said. “I’ve used every opportunity that I can to do that. There have been a series of letters that college and university presidents have signed over the course of this year, and I’ve taken advantage of every one of those.”When students came directly to her office to speak about their concerns after the presidential election, Cervelli said she knew Saint Mary’s was unlike any other place.“To be able to understand students’ perspectives, what their concerns and passions are — that’s why we’re here,” she said. “There’s no more important thing.”An inclusive atmosphere can best be achieved if individuals with dissenting viewpoints respectfully voice their disagreements, rather than angrily debate, Cervelli said. In scenarios when opposing stances may easily surface — as they have been since last week’s DACA update — having peaceful, constructive conversations is essential, she said.“There’s a discussion across the nation right now on how campuses can encourage this free speech, because … it’s been very difficult,” she said. “I encourage students to create venues where they’re able to, in a civil way … express their opinions in a way that’s factual, informational … non-confrontational and to begin to look for areas of commonality.”Cervelli said compassion for DACA and undocumented community members should be high at a women’s college, since students at least partially understand the plight of being misrepresented and oppressed. “It’s important that all Belles are able to learn about and explore themselves and to be able to establish their beliefs,” Cervelli said. “That’s what our campus should be all about.”Students who may feel excluded or nervous about their future should trust in Saint Mary’s commitment to preserving ideals of love and empathy, Cervelli said.“Our doors are open to all,” Cervelli said. “We respect all, without exception.”Tags: cervelli, Cristal Brisco, DACA, Diversity, inclusion, saint mary’s, Sisters of the Holy Cross, Student Government Associationlast_img read more

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USA’s Graceland Renewed for Third Season; Will Aaron Tveit Return?!

first_img The show follows a group of undercover agents of the FBI, DEA and Customs who live together in a Malibu house. In addition to Tveit and Sunjata, the cast features Vanessa Ferlito, Manny Montana, Brandon Jay McLaren and Serinda Swan. In the second season finale, the FBI agent was left for dead after being smothered in a hospital bed as senior agent Paul Briggs, played by The Country House star Daniel Sunjata, scrambled to rescue him. He may have been too busy canoodling with Blythe Danner and her scarves at the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre. We’ll have to find out! The USA drama Graceland has been renewed for a 13-episode third season, Variety reports. The series return is set for summer 2015. The question on many viewers’ (read: Tveitertots) minds is whether Mike Warren, played by Broadway.com Audience Choice Award winner Aaron Tveit, is (SPOILER!) still alive.center_img View Commentslast_img read more

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Anwar al-Awlaki’s death hailed as major blow to al-Qaeda

first_img The killing of any of al-Qaeda’s leaders worldwide is a loss to al-Qaeda in Iraq specifically and a win for the security forces in all Iraqi cities since we know that al-Qaeda relies on its Iraqi chapter [branch] in order to derail the country’s democratic process,” Deputy Defense Minister Saadoun al-Dulaimi told Al-Shorfa. General Tariq al-Assal, an adviser at the Iraqi Ministry of Interior, described al-Awlaki’s death as “good news.” He said it was “very positive that global powers of the free world are converging for the purpose of disposing of extremism and terrorism.” Al-Assal said al-Awlaki was one of the key supporters of al-Qaeda in Iraq and “his death is a victory in itself which also serves to demoralise terrorists in their efforts to fight democracy, peace and security.” By Dialogo October 05, 2011 The killing of al-Awlaki would have numerous negative effects on al-Qaeda in the short term and on the future of the organization, Dr. Saeed Obaid al-Jamhi, president of the al-Jamhi Centre for Studies, told Al-Shorfa. Al-Awlaki was the “architect of long-distance recruiting for al-Qaeda, and it was he who planned the operations on U.S. soil, most notably his relationship with the officer Nidal Hassan and his relationship with the Nigerian [national],” al-Jamhi said. “Therefore, al-Qaeda’s loss with the demise of al-Awlaki could be on par with its loss with the death of its leader bin Laden.” Al-Jamhi added that it was al-Awlaki who orchestrated al-Qaeda’s media campaign around the world in the past few years. He also supervised al-Qaeda’s English-language publication, Inspire magazine. “Al-Awlaki elevated the organization from a local and regional player to a global one, thanks to the media hype he created and long-distance recruiting, at a time when the organization’s star had begun to dim and its strategic operations became scarce,” al-Jamhi said. “This further indicates the magnitude of the loss of al-Awlaki, who had achieved so much in such a short period.” Al-Jamhi said al-Awlaki played a strategic role in the organization, where he relied on planning one-man operations designed to cause heavy losses in the ranks of the enemy with few casualties for the organization, such as the operations carried out by Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab and Nidal Hassan. Al-Awlaki played a strategic role in the organization Al-Awlaki’s death is another blow to al-Qaeda center_img “The killing of al-Awlaki follows a series of blows received by al-Qaeda, from the killing of its leader Osama bin Laden to the killing of Atiya Abdel Rahman al-Libi, and lastly al-Awlaki, who was the spiritual leader of the organization, possessing a charismatic personality,” said Dr. Said Abdel-Mumin al-Ariki, a strategic issues and Islamist groups researcher. Al-Ariki said al-Awlaki was a candidate to succeed bin Laden on account of what he had done for the organization, both through the media and his long-distance recruiting. He said the killing of al-Awlaki and other leaders will weaken the organization. “There is also another factor that will weaken the organization: successful Arab revolutions and the spread of democracy through peaceful change. Al-Qaeda may not find a place in the near future in Arab countries especially as it believes in change through violence, which is the opposite of what Arab revolutions seek.” Iraqi officials: killing of al-Awlaki positive development BAGHDAD, Iraq – The Yemeni Ministry of Defense announced on Friday (September 30th) the killing of prominent al-Qaeda leader Anwar al-Awlaki along with three other al-Qaeda members. Yemeni officials told Al-Shorfa that al-Awlaki was killed on Friday in an air strike in a region between al-Jawf and Marib provinces. Samir Khan, a U.S. citizen of Pakistani descent who specialized in computer programming, was also killed, according to the ministry. The identities of the two other members have not been confirmed. An extensive surveillance operation led to the successful targeting of al-Awlaki and his companions, the Defense Ministry statement said. An al-Qaeda member previously arrested told Yemeni security officials that al-Awlaki was living in the village of al-Khasf in al-Jawf province, in the home of a man called Khamis Arfaj, according to the ministry. “The killing of Anwar al-Awlaki was the result of a major intelligence effort and cooperation between friends and brothers [colleagues] in this effort, the final outcome of which was the death of al-Awlaki and three organization members in an air strike that targeted them in an area between the provinces of al-Jawf and Marib,” Abdo al-Janadi, deputy minister of information and spokesman for the Yemeni government, told Al-Shorfa. Al-Janadi said al-Awlaki’s “demise is the inevitable fate of every terrorist and every outlaw.” Yemen is at war with terrorism and the killing of al-Awlaki was within this context, especially since he had rejected all peaceful calls to him to surrender voluntarily and face trial, he added. “Al-Awlaki left the government no peaceful option, particularly after he was charged with incitement and murder of foreigners,” al-Janadi said. Anwar al-Awlaki was a U.S.-born Muslim cleric of Yemeni descent. His name was linked to some of the hijackers who carried out the September 11th, 2001 attacks in the United States. He was also linked to the shooting at a U.S. army base in 2009. He reportedly corresponded with U.S. army officer Nidal Hassan, who opened fire at Fort Hood, Texas, in November 2009, killing 13 people. Al-Awlaki was also suspected of having been in contact with Nigerian Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, who tried to blow up a U.S. flight from Amsterdam to Detroit on Christmas Day 2009. He was sentenced in absentia to 10 years in prison in early 2011 for inciting the murder of a French engineer. last_img read more

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10 steps to enchantment

first_img continue reading » 15SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr There’s an art form to enchantment—connecting with consumers in a way that builds loyalty and engagement.Speaker Guy Kawasaki, marketing innovator and author, broke down that art form into 10 steps during his keynote address Monday at the America’s Credit Union Conference.“This is how you enchant, influence and persuade people,” he says:Be likeable. If you want to disrupt a business and influence and persuade people, you have to be likeable.Be trustworthy. Find something you agree on. And know that for members to trust you, you have to trust them first.last_img

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More Indonesian children may become malnourished amid pandemic, UNICEF warns

first_img“COVID-19 has hit vulnerable families the hardest,” Comini said. “Unless we urgently scale up prevention and treatment services for malnourished children, we risk seeing an increase in child illness and deaths linked to malnutrition.”According to UNICEF data, more than 2 million Indonesian children have suffered from severe wasting, while more than 7 million others under 5 years of age experienced stunted growth prior to the pandemic.Statistics Indonesia’s 2015 Intercensal Survey (SUPAS) estimated that the number of children 17 years old or younger in the country was 79.47 million, roughly 30.1 percent of Indonesia’s population of 266 million people in 2019.Globally, the number of malnourished children under the age of 5 is predicted to increase by about 15 percent this year, according to UNICEF.A recent survey conducted by Save the Children Indonesia found that reduced child welfare due to their parents’ loss of or decreased income, as well as limited support for children with disabilities, could increase the risk of malnutrition in 24 million toddlers across the country.UNICEF urged the government to improve public access to staple food items and to continue gathering data from vulnerable households so as to minimize the risk of malnutrition. The number of children suffering from malnutrition could spike in Indonesia as the government has struggled to stem the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the health issue, according to the United Nations International Children’s Fund.In a statement issued on Tuesday, UNICEF warned that job losses, an overloaded healthcare system and limited access to food supplies amid the current health crisis could exacerbate the already poor living conditions of children deemed most susceptible to stunting and wasting.UNICEF Indonesia representative Debora Comini said it was crucial that the government act swiftly to ensure the well-being of children amid the pandemic, particularly those from poor households. Topics :last_img read more

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Governor Wolf: Pension Reform Bill Saves and Protects Taxpayers, Reduces Wall Street Fees

first_img June 08, 2017 Governor Wolf: Pension Reform Bill Saves and Protects Taxpayers, Reduces Wall Street Fees Government Reform,  Government That Works,  Pension Reform,  Press Release,  Statement Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf released the following statement on the bipartisan support and final passage of Senate Bill 1, the pension reform compromise bill, which now heads to his desk for his signature:“The passage of Senate Bill 1 is an example of how Harrisburg can come together to make progress on issues that matter to the people of Pennsylvania. The collaborative and cooperative process that led to consensus is a byproduct of both Republicans and Democrats working with my administration to achieve significant reform.“This pension compromise achieves my foremost goals: continuing to pay down our debt, reducing Wall Street fees, shifting risk away from taxpayers, and providing workers with a fair retirement benefit, while providing long-term relief to school districts.“I look forward to joining members of the House and Senate, from both sides of the aisle, to sign this important bill into law.”The pensions reform compromise bill makes important progress including:It achieves the Governor’s foremost goals: continuing to pay down our debt, reducing Wall Street fees, and shifting risk away from taxpayers, all while providing workers with a fair retirement benefit.The new plan achieves these priorities by preserving a Defined Benefit pension, while also introducing a full Defined Contribution – 401(k) style plan option for new employees.It will save billions of dollars on the unfunded liability and will charge both retirement systems to reduce their Wall Street management fees by a combined $3 billion dollars.Achieving this compromise will also provide long-term relief to school districts, ensuring more future state dollars go directly into the classroom.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Gov. Wolf: State Continues Phased Reopening with 16 More Counties Set to Go Green on June 5

first_imgGov. Wolf: State Continues Phased Reopening with 16 More Counties Set to Go Green on June 5 May 29, 2020 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Press Release,  Public Health With more than 80 percent of the state in some phase of reopening, Governor Tom Wolf today announced that 16 additional counties will take another step forward and move to green effective 12:01 a.m., June 5. Counties include Allegheny, Armstrong, Bedford, Blair, Butler, Cambria, Clinton, Fayette, Fulton, Greene, Indiana, Lycoming, Mercer, Somerset, Washington, and Westmoreland.The first 18 counties moved to green today, including Bradford, Cameron, Centre, Clarion, Clearfield, Crawford, Elk, Forest, Jefferson, Lawrence, McKean, Montour, Potter, Snyder, Sullivan, Tioga, Venango and Warren.Eight counties moved to yellow today, including Dauphin, Franklin, Huntingdon, Lebanon, Luzerne, Monroe, Pike, and Schuylkill.Counties that remain in red and are expected to move to yellow by June 5 include Berks, Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lackawanna, Lancaster, Lehigh, Northampton, Montgomery, and Philadelphia.With more than half the state poised to be in the green phase on June 5, the governor this week provided an updated order for counties moving to green to give businesses and residents a clearer picture of what is permitted in that phase of reopening. The order includes these highlights:• Large gatherings of more than 250 prohibited.• Restaurants and bars open at 50% occupancy.• Personal care services (including hair salons and barbershops) open at 50% occupancy and by appointment only.• Indoor recreation, health and wellness facilities, and personal care services (such as gyms and spas) open at 50% occupancy with appointments strongly encouraged.• All entertainment (such as casinos, theaters, and shopping malls) open at 50% occupancy.• Construction activity may return to full capacity with continued implementation of protocols.• Visitation to prisons and hospitals may resume subject to the discretion of the facility. Visitors who interact with residents and patients must be diligent regarding hygiene. Given the critical importance of limiting COVID-19 exposure in nursing homes, personal care home and long-term care facilities, visitation restrictions will initially remain in place.Business frequently asked questions were also updated and are available here.Gov. Wolf also provided more options for counties in the yellow phase by allowing outdoor dining beginning June 5 and providing Summer Camp Guidance for providers, parents and caregivers.The Summer Camp Guidance includes information on what types of programs for children are permitted during the phased reopening, status of public playgrounds and the operation of community pools, and the status of organized team sports.The state continues to use risk-based metrics from Carnegie Mellon University, combined with contact tracing and testing capability and a sustained reduction in COVID-19 hospitalizations, to make decisions on county moves. The 50 new cases per 100,000 population continues to be a consideration, but not a sole deciding factor.As more counties and residents enjoy loosened restrictions, the governor stressed the need to balance resuming activities with keeping case counts low and taking personal responsibility by wearing a mask or choosing to stay away from crowds to reduce the likelihood of coming into contact with someone carrying COVID-19.“If we take the simple steps of wearing a mask, staying home when sick, and implementing social distancing tactics, we can help eliminate the spread of COVID-19 and make a huge contribution to getting our commonwealth back on track,” Gov. Wolf said.Ver esta página en español.last_img read more

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