bp Ventures, Woodside Energy and Blue Ocean Monitoring back BOSS in £10m funding round

first_imgBOSS is developing an autonomous underwater vehicle to conduct offshore seismic surveys bp Ventures, Woodside Energy and Blue Ocean Monitoring back BOSS in £10m funding round. (Credit: Blue Ocean Seismic Services) Blue Ocean Seismic Services, the marine seismic survey disruptor, has secured a total of £10 million of Series A investment from a group of world-leading energy technology and investment companies: bp Ventures, Woodside Energy and Blue Ocean Monitoring.The investment will be deployed to continue the development of a fully integrated system which uses long endurance self-repositioning autonomous underwater nodes to conduct offshore seismic surveys for oil and gas exploration and reservoir optimisation, whilst also identifying and monitoring carbon storage opportunities under the seabed.The technology has been designed to be fully containerised, scalable and modular allowing fordeployment to survey locations across the globe. While collecting high quality seismic data, the vehicle is anticipated to deliver substantial cost savings and to facilitate a significant reduction in survey time, thereby enabling results to be delivered much faster and at a lower cost than is available through current technologies. In addition to these commercial benefits, BOSS’ integrated autonomous system will reduce the HSSE risks, while the reduced survey time and the use of autonomous vessels will have a range of environmental benefits such as significantly reduced carbon emissions during operations.To support the project, BOSS has appointed a highly experienced technical team, and has a number of forthcoming engineering roles providing BOSS with the in-house expertise to develop its first autonomous underwater vehicle. In line with its strategy to establish a presence in key oil and gas markets, the team has established a new corporate head office, lab and workshop facility inFarnborough, UK, adding to its existing premises in Perth, Australia. It is planning to open other offices from next year.All three investors are actively involved in developing the technology and are represented at Boardlevel.Simon Illingworth, Managing Director & Chief Executive Officer, Blue Ocean Seismic Services said: “This significant investment marks an important milestone in the development of our revolutionary underwater vehicle and we are excited to be opening up a range of new job opportunities in Farnborough. This support from major industry innovators serves as a strong endorsement for our technology and vision as we continue our journey to disrupt the marine seismic acquisition sector. Through our technology, future customers will be able to explore the subsurface of the ocean whilst substantially reducing risk, carbon emissions, duration and cost, enabling customers to overcome a range of challenges.” Source: Company Press Releaselast_img read more

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Number of overseas landlords halves to 5.5% of buy-to-let market

first_imgOverseas landlords are abandoning the UK buy-to-let market in droves as the unfavourable exchange rate created by Brexit and a harsher tax regime bite, it has been claimed.Hamptons International says that although the decline has been ongoing over the past eight years, this year the proportion of the buy-to-let market controlled by overseas landlords has dropped dramatically to an-time low of 5.5%, down from 14.4% in 2010.The decline is taking place all over the UK but is most marked in London, where the proportion of homes let by an overseas landlord has dropped from 26% in 2010 to 14.4% this year.The South East has also seen similar but not quite so dramatic reductions in overseas landlords, while the regions with the fewest investors include Wales, the Midlands and the North East, the figures show.“The proportion of homes let by an overseas-based landlord has more than halved since 2010,” says Aneisha Beveridge, Head of Research, Hamptons International (left).“Sterling’s depreciation since 2016 undoubtedly makes it cheaper for international buyers to purchase property in Great Britain.“But the conversion of pounds back into local currency means additional costs which cut into an overseas landlords’ monthly income.  This, combined with a harsher tax regime for overseas investors is dissuading some international investors from entering the rental market.”Although the foreign property investment market is often portrayed as an Asian affair, the Hamptons International figures show that 34% of investors hail from Western Europe while 20% are from Asia and 13% from the US.Also, although Russians are much talked about, only 1% of foreign landlord come from Eastern Europe. overseas landlords Hamptons International Aneisha Beveridge buy-to-let foreign landlords December 17, 2018Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Housing Market » Number of overseas landlords halves to 5.5% of buy-to-let market previous nextHousing MarketNumber of overseas landlords halves to 5.5% of buy-to-let marketDecline has been particularly fast during 2018 and drops have been harshest in London, latest figures from Hamptons International show.Nigel Lewis17th December 201801,245 Viewslast_img read more

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Billy Bisogno withdraws from council race

first_imgMichael Bisogno ×Michael Bisogno JERSEY CITY – Six weeks before the Nov. 7 municipal election, and probably too late to take his name off the ballot, Michael “Billy” Bisogno has dropped out of the race to become Jersey City’s Downtown council member, succeeding Candice OsborneThe 35 year old actor and LGBT activist was one of six candidates in the Ward E council race and could have become the first openly gay person elected to the nine-member City Council.According to local media reports, Bisogno said his new role as executive director of Hudson Pride Connections Center made dropping out of the race necessary.Bisogno said, “I would rather do one job well than do two adequately.”Bisogno has thrown his support behind Nick Grillo, a funeral director and the only Jersey City native running for the Downtown council seat. The other candidates are attorneys Rebecca Symes, Madeleine Giansanti Cag, and Jake Hudnut, and James Solomon, who teaches politics and public policy at New Jersey City University and Hudson County Community College.County election officials began sending mail-in ballots to voters on Friday and have said it’s unlikely the county will pay to redesign the ballot to remove someone’s name.Mayor Steven Fulop has said he will not endorse a Ward E candidate unless there’s a runoff after the first round of balloting.last_img read more

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Ceremony marks opening of CSWR meditation room

first_imgThe Center for the Study of World Religions at Harvard Divinity School dedicated its new nondenominational meditation room in a ceremony on Monday, Oct. 4. New CSWR director Francis X. Clooney  presided over the event, which drew a large audience composed of members of the broad University community.HDS faculty members Janet Gyatso, Hershey Professor of Buddhists Studies, and Susan Abraham, assistant professor of ministry studies, provided reflections on meditation and the spiritual and intellectual life.“For me, mediation is the practice of unselving, but not in a modern sense of self flagellation,” said Abraham. “It is the idea that I am but a speck in the universe—a divinely reflected speck—but not the most important thing in the universe. There is a role I have to play, and perhaps that role is to be a channel, to use a Franciscan metaphor, for a divine energy.”Two musical pieces were performed by Harvard graduate students and CSWR residents Michael Klinger, Matt Lyons, and Rory Lindsay.After the musical reflections and the remarks by Gyatso and Abraham, Swami Tyagananda, a member of the Harvard chaplains and a Hindu monk (sannyasi) of the Ramakrishna Order, shepherded the crowd to the front of the meditation room. As people gathered around him, he untied a decorative ribbon on the doorway and then led as many people who could fit inside the space. After removing their shoes, some participants sat on rugs while others stood to listen to him deliver a Sanskrit blessing. The end of the ceremony was marked by applause. The room, open during normal business hours, is open to all members of the Harvard community.last_img read more

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HLS legal clinic lands victories for veterans

first_imgStanding in near-frozen water while guarding a bridge during the notorious Battle of the Bulge in 1945, the infantryman sustained such severe frostbite he almost lost a foot. Evacuated to a hospital in England, he avoided amputation but had serious problems with his feet the rest of his life. When he died in 2008 from a variety of health problems, his widow — who had very little income — applied for a type of benefit for survivors of veterans whose death had resulted, at least in part, from a service-related disability. But a doctor with the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) said losing the use of his feet had nothing to do with her husband’s death.It took nearly six years and a trip to federal court, but with the help of the Harvard Law School (HLS) Veterans Legal Clinic the widow finally prevailed, winning a monthly payment from the VA that completely changes her financial health. While two other VA doctors concurred with the first opinion, the clinic retained two experts of its own who reached the opposite conclusion. Under the guidance of Clinical Professor of Law Daniel Nagin, who founded the clinic in 2012, Christopher Patalano ’14 wrote a winning brief that persuaded the Board of Veterans Appeals that the VA was wrong. Chris Melendez ’15, a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, also worked on the case as a summer intern at the clinic.“I hardly had [any] income. Now I know I have something I can stand on. I’ve got more to live for,” the elderly client said as she thanked the students and Nagin for her victory.“After knowing that she had fought so hard and so long for these benefits,” said Patalano, “it was an extremely happy day when we received the final decision from the VA.”In just two years, more than 30 HLS students have enrolled in the Veterans Legal Clinic — housed at the WilmerHale Legal Services Center (LSC) in Jamaica Plain, with Nagin as its faculty director — and represented more than 100 clients in areas of federal and state veterans’ benefits, discharge upgrades, and estate-planning matters. They have landed numerous victories before the U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims (CAVC) and in veteran-related federal and state agencies, and assisted many more vets in companion programs at the Legal Services Center in such areas as combating predatory student lending, foreclosure defense, family law, and tax law.Among other victories, they obtained service-connected disability benefits for an Afghanistan war veteran diagnosed with cancer; won a female veteran’s appeal to the CAVC of the VA’s decision to deny her PTSD benefits for military sexual trauma; and successfully represented a veteran in an appeal of a state agency’s decision to deny benefits based on the character of his military discharge. The clinic also offers veterans estate planning under the guidance of Clinical Instructor Tamara Kolz Griffin, an excellent opportunity for students looking to develop their skills outside the courtroom.In a particularly consequential victory, students represented a combat veteran of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars in his appeal to the CAVC challenging the VA’s denial of benefits for a service-related injury. They persuaded the court to hear the case on its merits in a first-of-its-kind decision that now allows certain veterans returning from combat deployments additional time for to file appeals, and then succeeded in vacating the adverse lower-court decision. As part of its annual educational and outreach campaign, a three-judge panel of the CAVC heard oral arguments in the case in the Ames Courtroom at HLS in the fall of 2013, with clinic students arguing on behalf of the veteran.“That’s a big decision because it not only helped this client, but provides a new source of legal argument for other veterans whose appeals might otherwise not be allowed to proceed on the merits,” said Nagin.The clinic’s docket at the CAVC is a part of a partnership with the DAV (Disabled American Veterans) and Chisholm & Kilpatrick, a firm in Rhode Island. The clinic also participates in the Veterans Consortium Pro Bono Program at the CAVC. The clinic’s value is manifold, Nagin said, noting, “It’s a privilege to be able to advocate for someone who’s sacrificed for the nation.”From an educational standpoint, it provides remarkable opportunities. “The world of VA benefits is extraordinarily complex,” Nagin said. “It’s a labyrinth of statutes and regulation and policies, which is a great teaching environment.” The cases require students to work with medical experts, “providing a rich opportunity to see how the legal and medical frameworks intersect,” he added. It is an excellent training ground for practicing administrative law, and offers students the chance to get into federal court.Just as important, Nagin said, “We hope we light a flame — if it wasn’t already there — of pro bono commitment to veterans as people go off into their careers.” At least two 3Ls who have worked at the clinic are now looking to devote their careers to representing veterans, he said.last_img read more

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Tift Building Rededication

first_imgThe University of Georgia rededicated the newly renovated H. H. Tift Building on the UGA Tifton Campus Sept. 27.Renovation of the historic Tift Building — the campus’s first structure — was completed in May and funded by $5 million in state support. The facility houses the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics as well as administrative offices. The renovated building also contains modern classroom space to provide faculty and students with the latest in learning technology.Speakers at the rededication ceremony included UGA President Jere W. Morehead, Dean of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Sam Pardue and UGA student and biological sciences major Lolita Muñoz.Morehead emphasized the important link between UGA Tifton and the surrounding communities. “Today, we celebrate more than the renovation of the historic Tift Building,” Morehead said. “We celebrate the unwavering and longstanding bond between UGA Tifton and the many communities it proudly serves all across South Georgia. Indeed, the strengths and opportunities of this area of the state and the mission of this campus are perfectly aligned.” The Tift Building complements the campus’s vital research enterprise, which is recognized worldwide for scientific discoveries related to agricultural commodities such as cotton, peanuts, pecans, turf grass and vegetables. “We are a campus that thrives on research and providing an academic home for our future agricultural leaders,” said UGA Tifton Assistant Dean Joe West. “This is an important day in our history. President Morehead’s presence, along with other administrative leaders, emphasizes the significance not only of the Tift Building but also of our entire campus.” Following the ceremony, Morehead met with students in the Tift Building to hear about their academic experiences on campus. He also met with state and local officials from the area. Morehead, Pardue and other members of the UGA senior adminis tration, including Vice President for Public Service and Outreach Jennifer Frum and Vice President of Government Relations Griff Doyle, then traveled to the Tift County Cooperative Extension office to visit with UGA employees there. The Tift County Cooperative Extension office serves as an important bridge between the resources of the university and the needs and interests of the community — especially in regard to agriculture. Pardue underscored the critical role of UGA Extension in promoting economic development in the state and beyond. “UGA’s academic, research and extension experts in Tifton deliver advanced education, cutting-edge science, improved agricultural production methods and knowledge of the latest crop varieties, market developments and business practices,” Pardue said. “Their dedicated efforts help to create a vibrant and robust economic engine that sustains not only this corner of the state, but provides food and fiber for Georgia and the world.” The group of senior administrators concluded their tour of the Tifton area with a visit to Carroll’s Sausage and Meats in Ashburn. The local business has grown from 18 to 40 employees in five years, thanks to assistance from the UGA Small Business Development Center (SBDC). The SBDC helped owner Hugh Hardy Jr. develop a business plan and loan proposal, secure financing options and renovate a facility into a large retail store off Interstate 75. The SBDC also helped Carroll’s Sausage and Meats secure a loan to open a Thomaston store in 2014 and continues to work with the business on strategic planning and marketing. “The Small Business Development Center at the University of Georgia is helping hundreds of small business owners grow their companies, as well as helping entrepreneurs launch new businesses,” Frum said. “The economic impact of the work of the SBDC is felt throughout the state in the number of new companies and jobs created every year.”last_img read more

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Rounding Out the Gift List

first_imgGoLite’s Malpais Trinity Jacket and Tumalo Pertex Pant round out Habitual Hiker’s Holiday Gift Guide.GoLite's Malpais Trinity Jacket and Tumalo Pertex Pant round out Habitual Hiker's Holiday Gift Guide.Here’s a few more items I’ve used this past year that may help you round out your holiday gift list.Long time BRO readers know that I have gone through a number of sets of rain gear in the continuing quest to lighten my pack. I liked the performance and weight of the very lightest rain suits I could find, those made by Frogg Toggs and Rain Shield. However, they are both made of materials that are not very abrasion or tear resistant, so they’re great if you’re only going to be out for a weekend or so.With GoLite’s (www.golite.com; 888-546-5483) Malpais Trinity Jacket ($250) and Tumalo Pertex Pant ($100), I think I have finally found a fairly durable rain suit at a light weight. Only two ounces heavier than the suits I had been using, together the two items are a mere 13.3 ounces.Both have nylon exteriors for durability over time or during a long-distance hike. Waterproof-breathable membranes and fully taped seams keep you dry during inclement weather. The jacket has waterproof zippers, a fixed hood, hand pockets, and cuff closures. The pants have an elasticized waist, calf zips for easy on and off over boots, and ankle closures.If either item is beyond your budget, consider giving your hiking partner GoLite’s Dome Trekking Umbrella. It’s just $35 and weighs only 7 oz., yet with a canopy of 45 inches it provides coverage large enough to keep both hiker and pack dry.I’m sorry to say that this will be my last Habitual Hiker blog post for blueridgeoutdoors.com. About every year or so, the management brings in new bloggers to provide a different perspective on things. I’ve been privileged to be kept on board for almost three years. It’s been a great run. I’ve visited many and diverse places just so that I could write about them for you, and it’s been fun keeping up with hiking and related topics so that I could keep you informed of issues and items that may have a bearing on your times in the outdoors. I’d also like to thank those of you who took the time to write me with your comments, insights, and tips on places I should check out.However, I’m not going to stop hiking. In fact, with this break in writing responsibilities, Laurie and I are heading to New Zealand within the next few weeks to fulfill a nearly lifelong dream of traversing the Milford Track (billed as the “Finest Walk in the World”) and some other tramping opportunities on the South Island. You can always keep up with this and our other adventures by taking a look at my website, www.habitualhiker.com, to see where we are and what we are doing.Of course, the Blue Ridge and Appalachian Mountains are our home, so we’ll often be in the woods looking for new places and revisiting familiar and favorite haunts. I look forward to meeting many of you out there. Happy trails.last_img read more

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Mountain Mama: Save Big Ivy

first_imgWhen office work leaves my soul numb or I can’t take another minute of parenting without losing it, the river grounds me. Whether I’m kayaking, running, or waterfall gaping, there’s something about the moving water that brings me back to feeling balanced when I have no idea how to get there on my own. It might be seeing a turtle, otter, or blue heron that reminds me of grace. Other days simply watching the flow of the water, reminding me to let go and simply be, is enough. The river has become my way of connecting with my own depths and contours, and the people I’ve met on rivers have become some of my closest friends.The river has become my sacred place in the world, and being out in nature acts like a salve for my pain. Mother Nature has a way of healing. Becoming a parent has enhanced my appreciation and gratitude for spending time outside, and as I’ve become more concerned about the legacy I’m leaving for my child and his generation than personal pursuits I’ve begun to ask myself – what have I done to heal the natural world that has given so much to me?I’m starting to explore my role as a steward for the outdoors and realizing my responsibility to speak for what cannot speak for itself. Rivers are a sacred place for me, and as I raise my son, I want to preserve wilderness areas for him so that he can open a guidebook or google recreation areas and experience the same sense of possibility of all the places out there to explore. I want to increase the odds that when he’s finding his own place in the world where he feels connected, nourished by the deep, abiding sense of belonging, that place is near crashing waves or between mountain or in the shadows of trees, not in front of a screen or in a mall or on the streets.I’ve been asking more questions – why am I here and am I doing enough? The question can sound so big, and yet my work at a non-profit the past four years has taught me that meaningful change begins with a smile or glance. We don’t save the world all at once, and when we think in those terms, getting started can be paralyzing.My beginning will be this Thursday night at 7 p.m. at a meeting with the Forest Service at the Big Ivy Community Center (540 Dillingham Road just 25 minutes from Asheville) to save the old-growth forest from logging. For more information, check out Friends of Big Ivy. I hope to see you there, making time and space in your own busy lives to protect the sacred places where we go for fun and play, to wonder and imagine.last_img read more

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Piauí Comes Together to Fight Crack

first_imgBy Dialogo May 02, 2011 That’s why the work of the commission begins in the schools, where workers try to reduce the number of users by telling students of the perils of crack before they come into contact with the narcotic, Rocha says. The commission also is working to rehabilitate crack addicts. The initiative is increasingly gaining public support in Piauí. On April 17, more than 12,000 participated in the inaugural Piauí Walk Without Drugs through the streets of Teresina. “People spontaneously joined in, which shows that society is also looking for a solution,” Rocha says. Another challenge in the fight against crack is securing hospital beds to treat addicts. The Piauí government has asked the Ministry of Health to increase its resources so it can provide more comprehensive treatment programs to a constantly growing number of addicts. “More help needs to be made available for the addicts because there’s not enough to meet the current needs,” Rocha says. Police receive specialized training Piauí’s military and civil police forces are receiving specialized training from the Commission Against Crack and Other Drugs. Since January, 363 officers have been trained. It is expected that 1,900 military police officers will complete the training program by June. In the coming weeks, another 973 officers, including 450 in Teresina, are expected to receive certification. One of the main objectives of the training program is to teach law enforcement agents to differentiate the crack dealer from the crack user, Col. Pereira says. “We want to get past the social stigma that a chemically dependent person is a criminal,” Pereira says. “That person is a victim of the system, in need of treatment and support, and that is how he should be seen.” The training also teaches officers to identify crack based on its appearance. The officers also will be taught to approach a suspected crack addict, as well as to provide the Intelligence Center with information regarding possible hotspots of narcotics activity. “We want to ensure that every military police officer has the specific qualifications he or she needs to be successful,” explains Col. Pereira. The police’s goal is to continue their pursuit of narcotics dealers, Pereira says. “Through the efforts of the Commission Against Crack, we have been able to reduce statewide homicide rates by 36% during the first three months of 2011,” Pereira says. February, with just seven reported homicides, had the lowest monthly total in Teresina in the past eight years, according to the head of the Civil Police’s Metropolitan Patrol. A total of 35 homicides were committed in Teresina during the first three months of 2011, the fourth-lowest rate on record, behind the same period in 2003 (34 cases), 2009 (29 cases) and 2010 (30 cases). PORTO ALEGRE, Brazil – “I am very sad about the death of my son from drugs, but now I can rest.” The recent confession from the mother of a crack addict to the Piauí Gov. Wilson Martins offers a clear picture of the devastating effects crack has on society. “The stories get worse and worse,” says Fenelon Rocha, Piauí’s communications coordinator. “There are no age limits, no geographic borders or economic barriers. You can find crack all over the state and the effect has been tremendously devastating.” The government launched an offensive to stop the spread of crack in Piauí after hearing pleas from families who have been torn apart by the highly addictive drug. In January, the government introduced the Commission Against Crack and Other Drugs. The initiative unites the efforts of the governor’s office, the state’s legislative and judicial branches, and civic organizations in the fight against narcotics trafficking and consumption, Rocha says. But the initiative’s main target is crack. Here’s why: Nine out of every 10 violent crimes in Piauí involve drug use. In 80% of those cases, the drug used is crack, Rocha says. In addition, 66% of the homicides recorded in Piauí in 2010 involved crack addicts, according to the state’s Office of Public Safety. Once the commission was introduced, the statistics began to change. “We’ve never dismantled so many gangs and drug-dealing spots before, nor have we arrested so many drug dealers,” says Col. Rubens Pereira, commander of the Piauí Military Police. In January alone, officials arrested 18 suspects in connection with drug-related crimes in the state capital of Teresina, according to information from the Piauí Narcotics Control Bureau. During the first three months of 2011, 170 were apprehended on narcotics trafficking charges in Piauí, Rocha says. In 2010, 240 suspected narcotics dealers were arrested and 60 kilograms (132 pounds) of narcotics – 70% of which was crack – was seized, in addition to R$1 million (US$632,000) in cash, property and vehicles. The initiative combats crack by focusing on apprehending traffickers and preventing the number of new users from growing. last_img read more

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What does the NCUA require from a credit union business continuity plan?

first_imgAre you getting ready to do some business continuity planning (BCP)? Does your credit union need a little guidance on where to start and what you’ll need? In this blog, we’ll run through some of the basic NCUA requirements for your credit union’s business continuity planning efforts.This guide shouldn’t serve as an official source. Please double check the NCUA business continuity planning requirements before checking this item off your to-do list.Nevertheless, if you’re trying to get in the ballpark, or if you want to see what you’re getting yourself into, this is the place to start. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img

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