Case round up in brief

first_imgCase round up in briefOn 1 Dec 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. This month’s case round up in briefPregnancy-related dismissals The applicant was dismissed because of her poor sickness record. Herabsences included a small amount of pregnancy-related absence. The EAToverturned a finding of sex discrimination on the grounds that thepregnancy-related absence was not the reason for the dismissal. There was noevidence to suggest that the decision would have been any different if thepregnancy related absence had not been taken into account. (Nottingham CityCouncil v Redmond, EAT) “Normal day-to-day activities” do not include sports An inability to cycle, keep goal and play snooker was not sufficient todemonstrate a substantial adverse impact on normal day-to-day activities underthe DDA. The tribunal had wrongly considered what were normal day-to-dayactivities for a person of the applicant’s age and gender. Sports, hobbies andgames are not to be treated as normal day-to-day activities for the purposes ofthe Act. (Coca-Cola Enterprises v Shergill, EAT) Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Flexible working bad for business say money men

first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Flexible working bad for business say money menOn 15 Apr 2003 in Personnel Today More than a third of finance directors believe new flexible workinglegislation in the Employment Act will damage business by increasingadministration and costs. A survey of more than 300 finance directors shows that bosses are concernedthe new right for parents of young children to request flexible workingarrangements will lead to disruption in the workforce. The research, by recruitment firm Reed Accountancy, suggests financedirectors feel costs will rise as employers will have to hire temps andincrease overtime to cover staff working flexibly. In a separate survey legal consultancy Peninsula reported a 41 per centincrease in the number of calls to its advice line since the introduction ofthe new rights on 6 April. The firm claims employers are unhappy at the introduction of more red tapeand said many of the calls were from companies not aware of the changes untilthe last minute. Peninsula normally receives about 850 calls per day, but in the two daysfollowing the Employment Act’s introduction, it had 2,380 individual inquiries.www.reed.co.ukwww.peninsula-uk.com Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Near-surface turbulent fluxes in stable stratification: calculation techniques for use in general-circulation models

first_imgPractically oriented flux-calculation techniques based on correction functions to the neutral drag and heat/mass transfer coefficients are further developed. In the traditional formulation, the correction functions depend only on the bulk Richardson number. However, data from measurements of turbulent fluxes and mean profiles in stable stratification over different sites exhibit too strong variability in this type of dependencies. Indirect evidence from climate and weather prediction modelling also shows that the traditional flux-calculation technique is not sufficiently advanced. It is conceivable that other mechanisms besides the surface-layer stratification and, therefore, other arguments besides the bulk Richardson number must be considered. The proposed technique includes a newly discovered effect of the static stability in the free atmosphere on the surface-layer scaling and accounts for the general essential difference between the roughness lengths for momentum and scalars. Besides bulk Richardson number, recommended correction functions depend on one more stability parameter, involving the Brunt–Visl frequency in the free atmosphere, and on the roughness lengths.last_img read more

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The biodiversity of the deep Southern Ocean benthos

first_imgOur knowledge of the biodiversity of the Southern Ocean (SO) deep benthos is scarce. In this review, we describe the general biodiversity patterns of meio-, macro- and megafaunal taxa, based on historical and recent expeditions, and against the background of the geological events and phylogenetic relationships that have influenced the biodiversity and evolution of the investigated taxa. The relationship of the fauna to environmental parameters, such as water depth, sediment type, food availability and carbonate solubility, as well as species interrelationships, probably have shaped present-day biodiversity patterns as much as evolution. However, different taxa exhibit different large-scale biodiversity and biogeographic patterns. Moreover, there is rarely any clear relationship of biodiversity pattern with depth, latitude or environmental parameters, such as sediment composition or grain size. Similarities and differences between the SO biodiversity and biodiversity of global oceans are outlined. The high percentage (often more than 90%) of new species in almost all taxa, as well as the high degree of endemism of many groups, may reflect undersampling of the area, and it is likely to decrease as more information is gathered about SO deep-sea biodiversity by future expeditions. Indeed, among certain taxa such as the Foraminifera, close links at the species level are already apparent between deep Weddell Sea faunas and those from similar depths in the North Atlantic and Arctic. With regard to the vertical zonation from the shelf edge into deep water, biodiversity patterns among some taxa in the SO might differ from those in other deep-sea areas, due to the deep Antarctic shelf and the evolution of eurybathy in many species, as well as to deep-water production that can fuel the SO deep sea with freshly produced organic matter derived not only from phytoplankton, but also from ice algae.last_img read more

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Cambridge overtake Oxford

first_imgCambridge has dethroned Oxford as the nation’s leading institution, says a new university league ranking released last Sunday.According to the research conducted by the The Complete University Guide, this year Cambridge has jumped ahead of Oxford in the specific areas of research, entry standards and completion rates.Over the past ten years, Oxford has occupied the top spot in the guide’s rankings with the exception of this year and 2007, when it was nudged out by Cambridge.Despite Oxford’s shift, the University Guide’s top five institutions remain the same group: Imperial College London continues to rank third, whilst London School of Economics and Durham have swapped positions as fourth and fifth.last_img

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Body armor on the way for a pair of EPD K9s

first_img WhatsApp Previous articleElkhart city government holding a Virtual Town Meeting Tuesday eveningNext articleGolfer Tiger Woods injured in one-vehicle rollover crash Tommie Lee Pinterest IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Twitter By Tommie Lee – February 23, 2021 0 300 Big Mike and Maja (Elkhart PD) A donation is being made to Big Mike and Maja.They’re K-9 officers with the Elkhart Police Department, and they’ll receive bullet and stab protective vests thanks to Vested Interest In K-9s Incorporated.The non profit is providing the vests courtesy of a donor in St. Louis, and they should arrive in the next eight to ten weeks.The charity has donated more than 4,100 of the custom-fitted body armor vests to K-9 dogs in all 50 states since 2009. Facebook Google+ Google+ Facebook Body armor on the way for a pair of EPD K9s Pinterest Twitter WhatsApplast_img read more

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A Transcendent Vitality: Harvard at 375

first_imgTo honor the University’s dynamic history, the Harvard University Archives has mounted an extensive 375th anniversary exhibition entitled “A Transcendent Vitality.” Through this seven-month, commemorative exhibition in Pusey Library, the Archives shines a celebratory light on its unique research collections as they illustrate Harvard’s history and anticipate the University’s continuing impact.According to University Archivist Megan Sniffin-Marinoff, “Rich history, cherished traditions, and social impact are significant hallmarks of the University’s first 375 years. Because the Archives is the official repository of Harvard history, our holdings uniquely express both the University’s history and its aspirations up to the present day.”The exhibition takes its title from remarks by Harvard President Charles W. Eliot on the occasion of Harvard’s 250th anniversary in 1886:And universities are among the most permanent of human institutions. They outlast particular forms of government, and even the legal and industrial institutions in which they seem to be embedded. Harvard University already illustrates this transcendent vitality.“A Transcendent Vitality” includes more than 85 items, organized by century. Materials range from Ann Radcliffe’s 1643 bequest—for Harvard’s first scholarship fund—and Harvard’s 1650 Charter to a 1947 watercolor by the noted African-American artist Allan Rohan Crite and President Faust’s first e-mail to the Harvard community.Exhibition visitors will see manuscripts, letters, maps, miniatures, photographs, cyanotypes, and even a board game and a dining hall tray designed by Walter Gropius. Because of the fragility and light sensitivity of many of these materials, in many cases digital copies will be displayed.“A Transcendent Vitality” is on view until May 25 in the lobby of Pusey Library from 10 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday (excluding holidays). During the week of October 11, visitors can access the exhibition directly from Harvard Yard through the main doors of Pusey Library. For all remaining dates, access is by way of the Lamont Library main entrance.The Harvard University Archives is the oldest and one of the largest academic archives in the United States. It collects, preserves, and provides access to a comprehensive record of life at Harvard. The collections in the Harvard University Archives, which date from the 17th century to the present, are used by scholars of American social, intellectual, and academic history; by historians of Harvard, including University departments studying their own histories; by students learning the methodology of historical research; and by the general public. The collections support teaching and related research by faculty and students at Harvard, administrative research by University staff, and in-depth historical research by scholars from around the world. For more information, visit the Archives web site at http://library.harvard.edu/university-archives. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Undergrads fill the gap

first_imgSix Harvard College students taught English to new residents of Boston as part of the inaugural Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA) Adult English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) program.The program was planned, created, and run by local college students, primarily those from Harvard College.Jesper Ke ’19, one of the teachers, said he was inspired to get involved by his parents’ story.“My parents immigrated to the U.S. nearly three decades ago from China and benefitted from free ESOL classes offered in the local community,” Ke said. “I’ve always seen my involvement in ESOL and naturalization-assistance courses as a way to pay it forward to other immigrants, especially those who don’t have as many resources to learn English.”Before last summer, Ke had volunteered through PBHA with Chinatown Citizenship, a program that offers free English and naturalization assistance courses to immigrants. It was through this that he discovered significant gaps in ESOL programming in Boston. According to Boston Redevelopment Authority statistics, more than 4,000 individuals are on a waitlist for classes in Boston alone.“I felt that one way to help temporarily fill some gaps would be to engage Harvard students with local community organizations to provide free ESOL courses this summer to as many immigrants as possible,” Ke said. PBHA previously had provided English courses during the school year, but had not had a summer program of this scope before.Maria Carvahlo Tavares, who took the program in Dorchester this summer, described it as a rewarding experience and an effective way to help her strengthen her English-speaking skills.“It was very effective and really allowed me to improve my English,” she said. “The teachers did a great job of guiding the students through informative exercises. I hope that they will publicize the program so that more students can learn from and enjoy this like I did.”It takes a village to create a program like this from the ground up, and Jesper credits its many community partners for helping get things started.“We established relationships with over 10 community partners through phone calls and in-person meetings, designing the weekly class structure, hiring staff, and identifying curriculum and assessment methods,” he said.“Our main community partners were the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association in Boston’s Chinatown, St. Mark Community Education Program and VietAID in Dorchester, and Chelsea Collaborative in Chelsea. Our program wouldn’t have happened without them, because they understand the needs of their community far better than we do. Their advice allowed us to better tailor our curriculum to the unique needs of our learners, whether it was getting a job or visiting the doctor. Our partners also let us offer our classes in their spaces, which was much more convenient for our learners.”Mike Oliver, director of the St. Mark Community Education Program, said working with Harvard’s students was the highlight of his involvement.“They were responsible, enthusiastic, and dedicated,” Oliver said. “The learners were really pleased. At the end of the summer each class had a party where they thanked the Harvard students. It was a great experience and we’ve begun talking about a continued partnership.”Over the summer the program served approximately 300 low-income, immigrant learners each week. Most learners attended class twice a week over the two months of the program. All classes were free, and were offered in Chinatown, Dorchester, and Chelsea. PBHA hopes to build on the program’s success and offer courses next summer.last_img read more

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Private sector shows little interest in India coal mine auction

first_imgPrivate sector shows little interest in India coal mine auction FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:India received no bids for 15 of the 38 mines to be auctioned as a part of its plan to open up coal mining to private companies, reflecting little investor appetite for the sector clouded by environmental concerns and low margins.“A total number of 82 bids from 46 companies have been received off-line/physically in the office of the nominated authority for 23 coal mines/blocks,” the coal ministry said in a statement late on Monday.Coal production in India has largely been restricted to state-run Coal India Ltd and another smaller government-controlled company. Prime Minister Narendra Modi opened up coal mining to the private sector this year.In a statement released after the deadline for the submission of the technical bids passed, the coal ministry said only 23 of the 38 mines received bids, with only 20 of them getting more than one bid.The world’s second largest consumer, importer and producer of the fuel offered a range of financial incentives in a bid to attract investment and reduce imports.India’s largest coal trader, Adani Enterprises Ltd, and Jindal Steel and Power Ltd were among the companies that submitted bids, according to two sources familiar with the matter.[Sudarshan Varadhan]More: India gets no bids for two-fifths of coal mines up for auctionlast_img read more

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United Airlines boosts Thanksgiving schedule: Busiest since March

first_imgStill, airline schedules and travel are down sharply compared with last year as coronavirus cases surge to record highs. So far this quarter, the Transportation Security Administration screened 32 million people at U.S. airports, down from more than 90 million over the same period last year.The coronavirus pandemic has turned the airline industry on its head: Executives are grappling with not only sharply lower revenue but demand that’s concentrated among price-sensitive vacationers traveling domestically. Customers also are waiting longer to book their flights, a sign they are holding out to see how the virus impacts travel.About half of United’s customers will likely book Thanksgiving flights less than a month before departure, the carrier said, up from about 40% of last-minute bookings in 2019.- Advertisement – A United Airlines airplane takes off at San Francisco International Airport.Gary Hershorn | Corbis News | Getty Images JetBlue Airways said last week it will add 25 nonstop flights between Nov. 20 and Nov. 30 from the New York City area to Florida, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and Haiti.“As we head toward the holidays, we’re seeing signs of strong demand in certain markets,” said Scott Laurence, JetBlue’s head of revenue and planning. United Airlines said Monday it plans to boost its schedule during Thanksgiving week, expecting the busiest week since large swaths of the economy shut down at the start of the coronavirus pandemic in March.The Chicago-based airline said it is adding 1,400 flights to its schedule, a more than 9% increase during the week of Nov. 23 and is planning to “swap in larger aircraft when needed to accommodate last-minute demand.”Airline stocks surged Monday after Pfizer and BioNTech reported positive results from their late-stage Covid-19 vaccine trial.- Advertisement –center_img – Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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