Body armor on the way for a pair of EPD K9s

first_img WhatsApp Previous articleElkhart city government holding a Virtual Town Meeting Tuesday eveningNext articleGolfer Tiger Woods injured in one-vehicle rollover crash Tommie Lee Pinterest IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Twitter By Tommie Lee – February 23, 2021 0 300 Big Mike and Maja (Elkhart PD) A donation is being made to Big Mike and Maja.They’re K-9 officers with the Elkhart Police Department, and they’ll receive bullet and stab protective vests thanks to Vested Interest In K-9s Incorporated.The non profit is providing the vests courtesy of a donor in St. Louis, and they should arrive in the next eight to ten weeks.The charity has donated more than 4,100 of the custom-fitted body armor vests to K-9 dogs in all 50 states since 2009. Facebook Google+ Google+ Facebook Body armor on the way for a pair of EPD K9s Pinterest Twitter WhatsApplast_img read more

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A Transcendent Vitality: Harvard at 375

first_imgTo honor the University’s dynamic history, the Harvard University Archives has mounted an extensive 375th anniversary exhibition entitled “A Transcendent Vitality.” Through this seven-month, commemorative exhibition in Pusey Library, the Archives shines a celebratory light on its unique research collections as they illustrate Harvard’s history and anticipate the University’s continuing impact.According to University Archivist Megan Sniffin-Marinoff, “Rich history, cherished traditions, and social impact are significant hallmarks of the University’s first 375 years. Because the Archives is the official repository of Harvard history, our holdings uniquely express both the University’s history and its aspirations up to the present day.”The exhibition takes its title from remarks by Harvard President Charles W. Eliot on the occasion of Harvard’s 250th anniversary in 1886:And universities are among the most permanent of human institutions. They outlast particular forms of government, and even the legal and industrial institutions in which they seem to be embedded. Harvard University already illustrates this transcendent vitality.“A Transcendent Vitality” includes more than 85 items, organized by century. Materials range from Ann Radcliffe’s 1643 bequest—for Harvard’s first scholarship fund—and Harvard’s 1650 Charter to a 1947 watercolor by the noted African-American artist Allan Rohan Crite and President Faust’s first e-mail to the Harvard community.Exhibition visitors will see manuscripts, letters, maps, miniatures, photographs, cyanotypes, and even a board game and a dining hall tray designed by Walter Gropius. Because of the fragility and light sensitivity of many of these materials, in many cases digital copies will be displayed.“A Transcendent Vitality” is on view until May 25 in the lobby of Pusey Library from 10 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday (excluding holidays). During the week of October 11, visitors can access the exhibition directly from Harvard Yard through the main doors of Pusey Library. For all remaining dates, access is by way of the Lamont Library main entrance.The Harvard University Archives is the oldest and one of the largest academic archives in the United States. It collects, preserves, and provides access to a comprehensive record of life at Harvard. The collections in the Harvard University Archives, which date from the 17th century to the present, are used by scholars of American social, intellectual, and academic history; by historians of Harvard, including University departments studying their own histories; by students learning the methodology of historical research; and by the general public. The collections support teaching and related research by faculty and students at Harvard, administrative research by University staff, and in-depth historical research by scholars from around the world. For more information, visit the Archives web site at http://library.harvard.edu/university-archives. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Undergrads fill the gap

first_imgSix Harvard College students taught English to new residents of Boston as part of the inaugural Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA) Adult English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) program.The program was planned, created, and run by local college students, primarily those from Harvard College.Jesper Ke ’19, one of the teachers, said he was inspired to get involved by his parents’ story.“My parents immigrated to the U.S. nearly three decades ago from China and benefitted from free ESOL classes offered in the local community,” Ke said. “I’ve always seen my involvement in ESOL and naturalization-assistance courses as a way to pay it forward to other immigrants, especially those who don’t have as many resources to learn English.”Before last summer, Ke had volunteered through PBHA with Chinatown Citizenship, a program that offers free English and naturalization assistance courses to immigrants. It was through this that he discovered significant gaps in ESOL programming in Boston. According to Boston Redevelopment Authority statistics, more than 4,000 individuals are on a waitlist for classes in Boston alone.“I felt that one way to help temporarily fill some gaps would be to engage Harvard students with local community organizations to provide free ESOL courses this summer to as many immigrants as possible,” Ke said. PBHA previously had provided English courses during the school year, but had not had a summer program of this scope before.Maria Carvahlo Tavares, who took the program in Dorchester this summer, described it as a rewarding experience and an effective way to help her strengthen her English-speaking skills.“It was very effective and really allowed me to improve my English,” she said. “The teachers did a great job of guiding the students through informative exercises. I hope that they will publicize the program so that more students can learn from and enjoy this like I did.”It takes a village to create a program like this from the ground up, and Jesper credits its many community partners for helping get things started.“We established relationships with over 10 community partners through phone calls and in-person meetings, designing the weekly class structure, hiring staff, and identifying curriculum and assessment methods,” he said.“Our main community partners were the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association in Boston’s Chinatown, St. Mark Community Education Program and VietAID in Dorchester, and Chelsea Collaborative in Chelsea. Our program wouldn’t have happened without them, because they understand the needs of their community far better than we do. Their advice allowed us to better tailor our curriculum to the unique needs of our learners, whether it was getting a job or visiting the doctor. Our partners also let us offer our classes in their spaces, which was much more convenient for our learners.”Mike Oliver, director of the St. Mark Community Education Program, said working with Harvard’s students was the highlight of his involvement.“They were responsible, enthusiastic, and dedicated,” Oliver said. “The learners were really pleased. At the end of the summer each class had a party where they thanked the Harvard students. It was a great experience and we’ve begun talking about a continued partnership.”Over the summer the program served approximately 300 low-income, immigrant learners each week. Most learners attended class twice a week over the two months of the program. All classes were free, and were offered in Chinatown, Dorchester, and Chelsea. PBHA hopes to build on the program’s success and offer courses next summer.last_img read more

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Private sector shows little interest in India coal mine auction

first_imgPrivate sector shows little interest in India coal mine auction FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:India received no bids for 15 of the 38 mines to be auctioned as a part of its plan to open up coal mining to private companies, reflecting little investor appetite for the sector clouded by environmental concerns and low margins.“A total number of 82 bids from 46 companies have been received off-line/physically in the office of the nominated authority for 23 coal mines/blocks,” the coal ministry said in a statement late on Monday.Coal production in India has largely been restricted to state-run Coal India Ltd and another smaller government-controlled company. Prime Minister Narendra Modi opened up coal mining to the private sector this year.In a statement released after the deadline for the submission of the technical bids passed, the coal ministry said only 23 of the 38 mines received bids, with only 20 of them getting more than one bid.The world’s second largest consumer, importer and producer of the fuel offered a range of financial incentives in a bid to attract investment and reduce imports.India’s largest coal trader, Adani Enterprises Ltd, and Jindal Steel and Power Ltd were among the companies that submitted bids, according to two sources familiar with the matter.[Sudarshan Varadhan]More: India gets no bids for two-fifths of coal mines up for auctionlast_img read more

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United Airlines boosts Thanksgiving schedule: Busiest since March

first_imgStill, airline schedules and travel are down sharply compared with last year as coronavirus cases surge to record highs. So far this quarter, the Transportation Security Administration screened 32 million people at U.S. airports, down from more than 90 million over the same period last year.The coronavirus pandemic has turned the airline industry on its head: Executives are grappling with not only sharply lower revenue but demand that’s concentrated among price-sensitive vacationers traveling domestically. Customers also are waiting longer to book their flights, a sign they are holding out to see how the virus impacts travel.About half of United’s customers will likely book Thanksgiving flights less than a month before departure, the carrier said, up from about 40% of last-minute bookings in 2019.- Advertisement – A United Airlines airplane takes off at San Francisco International Airport.Gary Hershorn | Corbis News | Getty Images JetBlue Airways said last week it will add 25 nonstop flights between Nov. 20 and Nov. 30 from the New York City area to Florida, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and Haiti.“As we head toward the holidays, we’re seeing signs of strong demand in certain markets,” said Scott Laurence, JetBlue’s head of revenue and planning. United Airlines said Monday it plans to boost its schedule during Thanksgiving week, expecting the busiest week since large swaths of the economy shut down at the start of the coronavirus pandemic in March.The Chicago-based airline said it is adding 1,400 flights to its schedule, a more than 9% increase during the week of Nov. 23 and is planning to “swap in larger aircraft when needed to accommodate last-minute demand.”Airline stocks surged Monday after Pfizer and BioNTech reported positive results from their late-stage Covid-19 vaccine trial.- Advertisement –center_img – Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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BLOG: Governor Wolf’s Week, June 5 – June 11, 2016

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter June 10, 2016 Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf The Blog,  Videos,  Weekly Update This week, Governor Wolf took the most significant step the commonwealth has taken to reform our liquor system in 80 years by signing a bipartisan, compromise liquor modernization bill. Governor Wolf’s goal has always been to modernize the sale of liquor and beer in Pennsylvania and this reform package will finally bring Pennsylvania’s wine and spirits system into the 21st century. This bill will allow grocery stores that currently sell beer to sell up to four bottles of wine, will permit restaurants and hotels to sell up to four bottles of wine for take-out, and removes Sunday restrictions and state-mandated holidays.Additionally, a new jobs announcement brought welcome news to the commonwealth. Over the past four years, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has worked with Royal Dutch Shell to finalize plans to construct an ethane cracker plant in Western Pennsylvania, and this Monday, Governor Wolf was notified that Shell has taken the final step to move ahead with this game-changing plant and create thousands of jobs in Pennsylvania.In Bethlehem and Scranton, the governor also continued to hold bipartisan roundtables to discuss local and statewide efforts to lead the nation in combating the opioid abuse and heroin use epidemic. Fighting Pennsylvania’s opioid and heroin epidemic is a top priority for the Wolf Administration and these roundtables are an opportunity to work collaboratively with the General Assembly and community leaders to ensure Pennsylvania leads the nation in the fight to combat the opioid abuse and heroin use crisis.Governor Wolf also continued to discuss the fair funding formula he signed into law last week. Prior to the signing of this bill, Pennsylvania was one of only three states in the nation without a fair funding formula. Having a formula in place will assure school districts that new funding will be distributed equitably and investments in education will no longer be determined by the influence of one legislator over another.Governor Wolf’s Week, June 5 – June 11, 2016Tuesday, 5/7/16Governor Wolf Announces Shell Cracker Plant Coming to PennsylvaniaGovernor Tom Wolf Statement on Passage of Liquor Reform BillGovernor Wolf Statement Supporting Continuing Medical Education For PrescribersGovernor Tom Wolf and First Lady Frances Wolf Invite the Public to Arts in the Garden at the Governor’s ResidenceWednesday 5/8/16Governor Wolf Signs Bill to Prevent Further Spread of Substance AbuseGovernor Wolf and Villanova Coach Jay Wright Urge Pennsylvanians to Stop Sexual Assault, Sign “It’s On Us” PledgeGovernor Wolf Signs Historic Liquor Reform BillThursday, 6/9/16BLOG: Governor Wolf and Villanova Coach Jay Wright Urge Pennsylvanians to Stop Sexual Assault (VIDEO)Governor Wolf Nominates Brig. Gen. Tony Carrelli to be Pennsylvania’s Adjutant GeneralFriday, 6/10/16In Bethlehem and Scranton, Governor Wolf Hosts Roundtables to Address Pennsylvania’s Opioid EpidemicHighlights from The Blog:BLOG: Governor Wolf Continues Fight Against Pennsylvania’s Opioid Epidemic (Round-up)BLOG: How Is Gov. Wolf Fighting Back Against the Heroin Crisis in the next Budget?BLOG: Basic Education Fair Funding Formula Signed into Law (Round-up)BLOG: Shell Cracker Plant a “Game-Changer” for Pennsylvania’s EconomyBLOG: Governor Wolf Announces Finalized Plan for Royal Dutch Shell Plant in Western PA (Round-up)BLOG: Governor Wolf Signs Historic Liquor Reform Bill (Round-Up)BLOG: Fighting Pennsylvania’s Opioid Epidemic (VIDEO)BLOG: Governor Wolf joined by Villanova Coach Jay Wright to Spread Awareness of “It’s On Us” Campaign Against Sexual Assault (Round-up)center_img BLOG: Governor Wolf’s Week, June 5 – June 11, 2016 By: The Office of Governor Tom Wolflast_img read more

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Kaymer builds commanding lead

first_img Press Association Martin Kaymer is on the brink of a fourth HSBC Abu Dhabi Golf Championship after an impressive third round. “I hit the ball just as well as I did yesterday and gave myself so many chances but I didn’t convert any. I was very wasteful today. It looks like I’m playing for second place tomorrow. “You’re always trying to improve and get better and I’m going to have to do something a bit better on the greens to shoot a good number and finish the tournament off well.” Kaymer’s nearest challenger is Belgium’s Thomas Pieters, whose third round 70 contained three birdies and just one bogey, on the 17th hole. Austria’s Bernd Wiesberger, who carded seven birdies and one bogey for a round of 66, is a shot further back alongside France’s Alexander Levy, who managed a 67 – the highlight of which was an eagle on the 18th. South Africa’s Charl Schwartzel and France’s Gary Stal are alongside McIlroy on 12 under, with France’s Victor Dubuisson (64), Wales’ Jamie Donaldson (65) and another South African, Dawie van der Walt (65), benefiting from good third rounds to join America’s Peter Uihlein (70) a shot further back. The US Open champion maintained the momentum with birdies on the seventh, eighth, 11th and 13th to move to 20 under par. Kaymer told Sky Sports: “Hopefully it’s going to be enough – I’ve really enjoyed the course. “I’ve had a very solid three days, with only two bogeys in the first round. “I’m a little bit surprised the way I played but the first round showed me I made the right choice taking it a little bit easy over the winter.” Rory McIlroy’s challenge wilted with a round of 71, which leaves the world number one sharing fifth place – eight shots behind Kaymer. The Northern Irishman got his third round moving with a birdie on the sixth and made another shot on the 12th – but the momentum was immediately halted as he bogeyed the next hole. The world number one admitted he was left feeling deflated after failing to take advantage of several promising situations with his putter. He said: “I feel like punching myself. I’m very disappointed, I just didn’t putt well – yesterday or today. The German carries a six-shot advantage going into the final 18 holes, after a round of 65 at Abu Dhabi Golf Club. Kaymer, winner of this tournament in 2008, 2010 and 2011, started brightly with birdies on the first two holes, before trimming another shot on the fifth. last_img read more

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MoPH/Milo Schools U-18 Football: Four more games carded for today

first_imgSCHOOLS football action will return to the Ministry of Education ground today, with the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) and Milo-sponsored schools Under-18 football competition.Following the opening round last week, Richard Ishmael Secondary will take on Brickdam in this week’s opening fixture, while Christ Church Secondary and Cummings Lodge Secondary will square off in the second game.In game three of the day South Ruimveldt will play Queenstown, while Sir Leon Lessons will play Carmel Secondary in the afternoon’s last fixture.In the 32-team competition the winners will cart of $500 000, second-placers $300 000, third-placers $200 000 and fourth-placers $100 000 in projects for their respective schools as well as individual prizes.last_img

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Pope is England’s best young player since Joe Root – Michael Vaughan

first_imgBy Stephan ShemiltFORMER England captain Michael Vaughan says Ollie Pope is England’s best young player since the emergence of current skipper Joe Root.Pope, 22, stroked an elegant 91 not out on the first day of the third Test against West Indies to help the hosts to 258-4.“He’s a wonderful player,” Vaughan told Test Match Special.“I don’t see a great deal going wrong with his game. It can pretty much cover all conditions.”Surrey’s Pope made his England debut as a 20-year-old against India in 2018, but was left out after playing only two matches.He returned for the tours over the past winter and made his maiden century against South Africa in January, along with three other half-centuries.Root was 21 when he made his Test debut in India in 2012. The deciding Test against West Indies is his 94th, during which time he has accumulated 7 661 runs.“Ollie Pope is the best young player I’ve seen in the England team since Joe Root,” added Vaughan, who himself made 5 719 runs in 82 Tests.“When he came on the scene a few years ago you could tell he probably wasn’t ready in his mind. “His game was possibly ready, but he wasn’t ready to cope with the big surroundings of Test match cricket and the spotlight that you’re under.”Pope’s classy innings at Emirates Old Trafford helped England from 122-4, a potentially perilous position.He added an unbroken 136 with Jos Buttler, who is unbeaten on 56, to leave the hosts with a superb opportunity to win the series.When told about Vaughan’s praise, Pope said: “It’s a massive compliment, especially from an ex-captain and one of the greats. “I take it as a massive positive, rather than seeing it as added pressure. It’s a nice thing to have said about you and hopefully I can fill those shoes.”With the three-match series poised at 1-1, England need to win in Manchester to regain the Wisden Trophy, which they surrendered to the West Indies in the Caribbean at the beginning of 2019.Victory for West Indies would mean their first series success in this country since 1988, while England are also trying to protect a six-year unbeaten home record.The outcome could be affected by the weather, with rain forecast at various points across the rest of the match.“Hopefully it doesn’t affect it too much,” said Pope. “If we can bat big then the dream scenario would be to get them in, make them follow-on and go again.”last_img read more

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Yonga anchors rising Wisconsin defense

first_imgOn a Badger soccer team that lived and died on its defensive performances last fall, every defender’s ability to do his job on the field will be critical to the team’s success this season. This is especially true of junior defender Paul Yonga.As one of the returning starters on a back line that managed to earn seven shutouts last year, the team will need Yonga to anchor their defense this year if they are to match their 2011 second place finish in a very competitive Big Ten Conference.Yonga, who two years ago was just another young player trying to adjust to the college game, comes into this season as one of the most experienced players on the field for UW after serving as a regular contributor on the team for the last two years.“You can’t give guys experience like that,” head coach John Trask said. “He has seen a lot now in his two years.“[Yonga] has been through two Big Ten seasons, two Big Ten tournaments, games in California and games in Florida. That experience makes it easier for us as coaches because he has seen it all before.”And, as if that wasn’t enough experience to consider him a seasoned veteran for the Badgers this year, Yonga spent his summer playing for a soccer team called Bridges FC. Based out of Chicago, they traveled across Europe scheduling matches against some of the most talented professional reserve teams in Denmark and the Netherlands.Even though Bridges FC generally fields soccer players who have already graduated college and are now looking to earn a trial or a contract with a European team, both Yonga and UW teammate Nick Janus were also given the opportunity to test their mettle against top European opponents. Just two years out of high school, the Brooklyn Park, Minn., native comes back to Madison this fall with his foot already in the door to a future of playing professional soccer in Europe after college.“It was a great experience, and playing professionally has always been a dream of mine,” Yonga said. “I definitely hope to go back after I am done with my college career, and hopefully I can maybe get a trial with a big club team in either Denmark or the Netherlands in the future.”An opportunity that only a select few players will ever get, it’s experiences like these that have helped the talented defender gain the respect of his teammates, especially the younger players, who look to Yonga as an example of what they need to do to be successful as they move forward in their own college careers.“He is always someone you can go and talk to,” freshman defender Adam Lauko said. “On the field, he is always telling you where to be, which can be really helpful in the transition from the academy game to the college level. He is someone for us younger guys to look up to.”As a result, it was no surprise when it came to naming team captains in the lead up to this fall, Yonga was immediately singled out by his teammates with fellow junior Chris Prince and senior Kyle McCrudden.“He is a junior captain,” Trask said. “We’ve got two of them this year, and I think that that speaks volumes about him as a person.”“He’s not a yeller and a screamer,” Trask said. “He leads by example, but I also think [Yonga] is just such a great personality. When things happen within the team and players need to be talked to and things like that, he doesn’t shy away from that either. He knows how to communicate with the guys.”At 5-foot-11 and 180 pounds, he certainly looks the part of a strong defender, but Yonga credits his soccer IQ after years on the field for allowing him to gain a competitive advantage on his opponents.“I am not necessarily the quickest,” Yonga said, “But I am strong, and I use my soccer smarts to get me in the best position to be successful in games, and hopefully get the team in a position to win.”Still, despite all of the things that Yonga has going for him as an individual heading into this season, it is the team goals that Yonga is most eager to cross off the list.“We want to get a Big Ten conference championship. We haven’t done that yet; we only came in second last year,” Yonga said. “Then also we really want to qualify for the NCAA tournament. We came pretty close last year as a bubble team, so hopefully we can finally make it and have a good run in the NCAA tournament.”If Yonga continues to shine in the defense this season, those goals might just be possible.last_img read more

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