Tutu, Jefferts Schori discuss mission in the church

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ George McGonigle says: From left, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town Desmond Tutu and David Crabtree, a news anchor at WRAL-TV in Raleigh, North Carolina, and a deacon in the Diocese of North Carolina. Photo/Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town Desmond Tutu shared a personal story from his childhood during a mission-focused conversation May 19 at Washington National Cathedral, a story that has stuck with him for more than 70 years.The 30-minute, live webcast conversation between Tutu and Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori was moderated by David Crabtree, a news anchor at WRAL-TV in Raleigh, North Carolina, and a deacon in the Diocese of North Carolina. It is available on demand here.Tutu told a story about his mother, a poorly educated domestic worker, who cooked and cleaned for blind, black women during an age in South Africa “when blacks were ‘inferior,’ or so they were told,” he said, adding that on this particular day, when he was 8 or 9 years old, he was standing with his mother at her place of work.“I saw something that I never thought,” said Tutu in a soft voice. “There was a white priest in a long flowing cassock and he had a large sombrero hat, and as he passed he doffed his hat to my mother. White priest, black woman in apartheid South Africa…. For him it is the normal thing that you do for any woman. This is how he demonstrated that he believed that each of us is a God carrier … I wasn’t aware that it was something that would stay with me. I am 80 now.”The priest was Trevor Huddleston, a well-known anti-apartheid activist who later became archbishop of the Anglican Province of the Indian Ocean.“I still remember the impact of Trevor Huddleston’s doffing and that was acknowledging what we say in our theology, ‘you are created in the image of God and you are a God carrier,’ and that is what we in our proclamation seek to be saying….”Crabtree asked Tutu and Jefferts Schori to define mission, where the church is concerned, and “how we best carry it out.”“Mission is really making us all aware of the incredible love that God has for all of us,” said Tutu. “It says things like, do you know what, you don’t have to earn God’s love. God loves you, period, and everything flows from there.”Jefferts Schori said, as Tutu pointed out, that mission is about receiving love and then responding by going out into the world to spread that love.“It is a matter of calling the near and the far off together into the fold; it is about healing and reconciling; it is about making that love incarnate in the lives of people around us and in the lives of people on the other end of the earth.”The conversation centered on the Anglican Five Marks of Mission. Crabtree asked, in reference to the first mark, “To proclaim the Good News of the Kingdom,” how do you bring that proclamation to a world so in need of the message, but mired in doubt?The question reminded Jefferts Schori of an encounter she had some years ago in a nursing home where a woman was wearing a sweatshirt that read on the front: “‘Jesus loves you’ and on the back it said, ‘but I’m his favorite.’ We all have a sweatshirt like that. We are all God’s favorite. But we need people to remind us of that,” she said.The doubt, she continued, “is an opportunity for someone else to reach out and respond; it’s an opportunity to grow in your confidence that you are that deeply, and abundantly and eternally loved, but it doesn’t happen for most of us without that fleshly encounter.”What we seek to say in the proclamation, Tutu responded, is not that the world we live in is a paradise, but that we do have an omnipotent God who “waits for us that we will be coworkers with this God.”“And that is our privilege and our responsibility: to help turn this wilderness into the garden that God had always intended his world to be,” said Tutu, who served as archbishop of Cape Town and primate of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa from 1986 to 1996.The Anglican Consultative Council, the Anglican Communion’s main policy-making body, between 1984 and 1990 developed the Five Marks of Mission to offer parishes and dioceses worldwide a practical and memorable “checklist” for mission activities.The Five Marks of Mission are:1. To proclaim the Good News of the Kingdom,2. To teach, baptize and nurture new believers,3. To respond to human need by loving service,4. To seek to transform unjust structures of society, and5. To strive to safeguard the integrity of creation and sustain and renew the life of the earth.In reference to Tutu’s story about the respect shown to his mother by Huddleston, the second mark and the Baptismal Covenant’s promise to respect the dignity of every human being, Crabtree asked: “How do we better doff our hats to people?”Jefferts Schori, who early on had been educated in a Roman Catholic school and was taught to curtsy whenever encountering a nun in the hallway, said she learned a lot from monastic tradition, where in recognition of God you bow to your brothers and sisters in community.“If we walked through life in that way,” giving thanks and recognizing the image of God “everywhere we go, the world would work differently, very differently,” she said. “We live in a society that so often assumes enemy rather than image of God.”In response to a question from Crabtree about how best to meet respectfully the needs of others, Jefferts Schori talked about the necessity for self-compassion.“When we have a sense of our own wilderness and have some compassion for ourselves, we can then have compassion for others. It is essential to be able to see that wounded human being who is in need of partnership,” she said.“That is the only avenue when we can be co-healers, co-creators with God in responding to that wound. I think that is the salvation of the world. But it requires finding the vulnerability in your own soul.”Segueing into the fourth mark of mission, “transforming unjust structures of society,” Crabtree observed that finding that “vulnerability” can be “like swimming upstream” attempting to correct society’s unjust structures. “Yet you have to keep pushing bit by bit and trusting that God sees the pushing because we know God does see that …”Speaking from his experience as an anti-apartheid leader in South Africa and witnessing the oppression and injustice many faced, Tutu said there was a time when many in the world, and even some of the leaders of the movement themselves, could have said, “this ghastly system, there is no way in which we can overturn it.”“Well,” he laughed. “Remember what happened? People in South Africa did their thing, but it was very largely the support that we got from the international community, the anti-apartheid movement, you know those alliances that we had, young people demonstrating and working for divestment, and here we are today.“In the 1980s and even in the 1990s, many were saying no, the only way that thing is going to be resolved in South Africa is through an awful, racial bloodbath, but it didn’t happen. And it was because of an alliance of people around the world.”Tutu received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984 for his efforts to end apartheid. Following the fall of apartheid in 1994, he headed South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission.Crabtree, who had remembered seeing Tutu on ABC’s “Nightline” with Ted Koppel in the 1980s, asked him when he realized that he had to partner with God in fighting apartheid. “You didn’t just appear there you had already been in this fight for a long time,” Crabtree said.Again, Tutu laughed and said, “I don’t know. One, I suppose is to be careful what you ask God to do with you, ‘when you say here I am use me,’ and God takes you at your word.”He said that the success of the anti-apartheid movement was due to the outpouring of prayers from around the world, adding that he was just one person involved in a much larger community. “You knew you were part of something that would ultimately not be defeated,” he said.Regarding the power of prayer, in a follow up question posed by ENS following the webcast, Tutu said: “One of the wonderful things is that God does not usually let us know where our prayers really work on this side of death because we, like it or not, we’d get slightly swollen heads. But the fact that prayer works is not in doubt.”Also following the webcast, Jefferts Schori said the work she does is “undergirded by prayers and the strength comes from places that I don’t know where. And there is a sense of peace in the midst of it that comes, I believe, from the prayers of many, many, many people.“I cannot do the work I do without that. I could not do it without that. And it’s an immensely humbling experience to realize that.”At the start of the webcast, before moving the conversation to mission, Tutu took a moment to commend the Episcopal Church for its “generosity and gentleness of spirit” when it could have been “abrasive” in its response to recent challenges in the Anglican Communion.Crabtree wrapped up the conversation on mission by addressing the fifth mark, “To strive to safeguard the integrity of creation and sustain and renew the life of the earth.”“God set us in this garden to care for it because it is the source of physical life for all that is,” Jefferts Schori said.“Christians have unfortunately in our history often misunderstood dominion as taking it for private property. It’s about house-holding, husbanding, and housekeeping carrying for the stuff of creation.“It will be healed as we grow into a greater consciousness that we are all intimately connected … we are a dynamic community … and we cannot dismiss any part of it – the whole of its being is essential to our life and to the life of every other human being and every other creature on this planet,” she said.— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC February 11, 2013 at 11:24 am Why doesn’t Bishop Jefferts Schori mention the definition of mission found in the Catechism?“Q. What is the mission of the Church?”“A. The mission of the Church is to restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ.”(See page 855 of the BCP)The so-called “marks of mission” stated by the ACC are all important as activities in support of mission but unless the definition of mission is clear they are like “sounding brass and clanging cymbal”. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL May 21, 2012 at 7:53 pm I think we cannot excuse ourselves in any age from being equally responsible for acts of violence against one another, including in our words and conversation, our gossip and tale-telling. Those same newcomers to a new land were violent with those they met already here. The question posed remains: when will I see God in others first and always, not last and sometimes. I stand responsible constantly for my thoughts and words and actions. My fresh start is here and now. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service May 21, 2012 at 10:51 pm When I read such a well thought out piece such as this, I am reminded of the words of the hymn: “reclothe us in our rightful minds … and then may we like them (the disciples) without a word, rise up and follow thee.” “All will be well.” the Rev. Deacon Gini Hart says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tutu, Jefferts Schori discuss mission in the church A conversation at Washington National Cathedral Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Jim Hunt,Nicholas James Irwin Hunt says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Robert W Kley says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN May 21, 2012 at 5:35 pm If anyone finds it hard to see the image of God in the latest suicide bomber, just remember that as a Church we have been through a lot of that stuff, using force, as with Constantine wanting to make the Roman Empire Christian, and Elizabeth I and others wanting the whole country to be Anglicans! Then there were the Crusades. No wonder people went off to America to make a fresh start. Featured Jobs & Calls By Lynette WilsonPosted May 21, 2012 Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Jeffrey Knox says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 May 22, 2012 at 11:55 am I can never hear enough of these kind of discussions. Wonderful questions and answers. Thank you, Katharine and Bishop Tutu. Anglican Communion, Comments (6) Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Rev. Julianne Sifers says: Comments are closed. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Shreveport, LA June 7, 2012 at 1:06 pm Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and Archbishop Desmond Tutu: Thank you for your faithful expresion of Chirst’s calling to all persons to live lives of service that extend arms of love and healing in a world broken and hungry for hope.last_img read more

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Diócesis de California auspicia una conversación de ecojusticia

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls Por Lynette WilsonPosted May 25, 2017 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Diócesis de California auspicia una conversación de ecojusticia El Obispo Primado asiste a la cuarta ecoconfirmación y predica en ella Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID El obispo de California Marc Andrus, el obispo primado Michael Curry y la Rda. Stephanie Spellers (a la extrema derecha), canóniga del Obispo Primado para la evangelización, la reconciliación y el cuidado de la creación, posan con los confirmandos durante un oficio de ecoconfirmación en el Presidio de San Francisco el 20 de mayo. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.[Episcopal News Service – San Francisco, California] “La obra de salvar la creación de Dios no es nada menos que la obra de Dios”. El obispo primado Michael Curry pronunció estas palabras durante un sermón el 19 de mayo aquí en la catedral de La Gracia [Grace Cathedral] en que enmarcaba el cuidado de la creación en el ámbito del Movimiento de Jesús.“Este es el mundo de Dios”, dijo él, alentando a los presente a afirmarse y a animarse unos a otros en el cuidado de la creación de Dios.“Estoy convencido de que Dios vino [a vivir] entre nosotros en Jesús para mostrarnos el camino no sólo de llegar a ser la familia humana, sino la familia de Dios. Y es por eso que estamos aquí porque el medioambiente, no, la creación, es parte de la familia de Dios. La familia de Dios es todo el mundo y el universo creados”.La Iglesia Episcopal ha visto desarrollarse las ideas del Obispo Primado sobre el Movimiento de Jesús en su dinámica predicación y en sus expresiones desde que él asumiera el cargo en noviembre de 2015. Su sermón del 19 de mayo situó el cuidado de la creación y la justicia medioambiental de lleno en ese contexto.El obispo primado Michael Curry predicó el 19 de mayo en la eucaristía de ecojusticia en la catedral de La Gracia, en San Francisco. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.El Obispo Primado le predicó a una congregación interreligiosa que abarrotaba la catedral como parte de un diálogo más amplio de ecojusticia sobre la salvaguarda del clima, el alimento y el agua auspiciado por la Diócesis de California del 18 al 20 de mayo. El 18 de mayo, la catedral celebró una conferencia en beneficio del Centro para la Agricultura ‘San Bernabé’ un colegio universitario episcopal del norte de Haití, y dos grupos medioambientales del área de la Bahía de San Francisco. El 19 de mayo una mesa redonda exploraba los efectos del cambio climático en la agricultura y en la seguridad alimentaria. Finalmente, en la mañana del 20 de mayo, Curry presidió el oficio de ecoconfirmación.La conversación tuvo lugar en un momento en que el gobierno de Trump procura destripar las regulaciones medioambientales destinas a reducir las emisiones de gas de efecto invernadero y a proteger la atmósfera y los recursos hidráulicos. El gobierno también está revisando las tierras públicas y los monumentos nacionales, contemplando el abrirlos a las perforaciones de petróleo y de gas, y ha prometido revivir la minería carbonífera.La 78ª. Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal priorizó la evangelización, la reconciliación y el cuidado de la creación; para abordar esta última creó un Consejo Asesor para el Cuidado de la Mayordomía de la Creación y autorizó la creación de materiales litúrgicos para honrar a Dios en la creación.La conversación sobre ecojusticia busca comprometer aún más a los episcopales con los problemas ambientales, entre ellos el agua y la seguridad alimentaria y la justicia medioambiental, en particular después de la solidaridad que mostrara la Iglesia Episcopal con la nación sioux de Roca Enhiesta [Standing Rock] en su oposición a que el Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas atravesara sus tierras tribales  debajo del río Misurí a la altura del lago Oahe,  que surte de agua a la reserva indígena de Roca Enhiesta y a otras río abajo. Las naciones indígenas de Estados Unidos y del mundo entero se unieron en una muestra de solidaridad sin precedentes con los sioux de Roca Enhiesta, y junto con activistas del clima, ambientalistas y otros individuos, entre ellos muchos episcopales, en su oposición al oleoducto. Se han detectado salideros a lo largo de un ramal y en el oleoducto principal, el cual está programado que empiece a operar a plena capacidad el 1 de junio.La Iglesia Episcopal, a través de su Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales con sede en Washington, D.C., y la Red Episcopal de Política Pública, tomando como guía las normativas de la Iglesia, aboga por el cuidado de la creación tanto en el ámbito local como en el nacional e internacional.El obispo de California Marc Andrus moderó una mesa redonda sobre ecojusticia en la catedral de La Gracia el 19 de mayo. Los panelistas fueron, de izquierda a derecha, Nicolette Hahn Niman, escritora y ganadera; Aaron Grizzell, director ejecutivo de la Fundación Comunitaria Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. del Norte de California; la Rda. Elizabeth DeRuff, fundadora de Honoré Farm and Mill en el Condado de Marín, California; Jayce Hafner, analista de política nacional de la Iglesia Episcopal y Grace Aheron, activista y miembro de la junta directiva de Cultiva: el Movimiento Alimentario Episcopal. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.“La política y la fe, no parecen [tener] una correlación natural al principio. Encuentro que, mientras trabajo con miembros de la Iglesia Episcopal y visito diferentes diócesis y parroquias, me cuestionan muchísimo, personas que dirán ‘tenemos estos increíbles ministerios en nuestra iglesia [nuestro edificio| es energéticamente eficiente… por qué debemos abogar más allá de eso, por qué debemos politizarnos’”, dijo Jayce Hafner, analista de la política nacional de la Iglesia durante la mesa redonda del 19 de mayo.“Yo diría que hay una diferencia entre politizarse y [participar] en la promoción de políticas. La promoción de políticas nos permite cerrar el círculo entre la impactante labor programática que estamos realizando para cerciorarnos de que llega a los salones del poder. Porque cuando uno contempla la injusticia en nuestro país, especialmente en el terreno medioambiental, la política es una herramienta increíble para promover la injusticia sistemática o para propagar la justicia para nuestra gente y para nuestro planeta”.Curry lo enmarcó de esta manera en su sermón: la esperanza y la salvación de la humanidad descansan en una visión de un mundo de Dios que no es una pesadilla. Y llamó a los presentes en la catedral y en la Iglesia Episcopal a alabar a Dios no sólo en su culto, sino [también] salvaguardando el agua y el aire.“Esto que hacemos no es el buenismo secular, este es el Movimiento de Jesús… Jesús vino a mostrarnos cómo llegar a ser la familia de Dios y esa es nuestra esperanza y nuestra salvación”, dijo Curry. “Este es el Movimiento de Jesús y nosotros somos la rama episcopal del Movimiento de Jesús y nada en la Tierra puede detener ese movimiento”.La ecoconfirmación incluyó una “caminata cósmica”, una meditación sobre la historia de la creación a partir del Big Bang hace 14.000 millones de años y la formación de la atmósfera de la Tierra, pasando por el surgimiento del homo sapiens, la escritura de la Biblia y el nacimiento de Jesús hasta el descubrimiento del oro en California en 1848 y la conversión del petróleo en una importante industria del estado a principios del siglo XX, para culminar en 1969, cuando los humanos vieron por primera vez la Tierra desde el espacio. Alisa Rasera sirvió como caminante cósmica. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.Al día siguiente, unos 40 confirmandos ratificaron sus creencias cristianas como miembros plenos de la Iglesia Episcopal. Los confirmandos —muchos de ellos alumnos de la  escuela para varones de la Catedral [Cathedral School for Boys] se reunieron con otros episcopales entre los cedros, cipreses y eucaliptos del mirador de la Puerta de Oro del Presidio. Una densa niebla no dejaba ver el puente de la Puerta de Oro y las sirenas de niebla oíanse a lo lejos.Esta era la cuarta ecoconfirmación en la Diócesis de California, que se distingue de la confirmación tradicional por tres palabras que se agregan a la quinta y última pregunta del Pacto Bautismal: “¿Lucharás por la justicia y la paz entre todos los pueblos y respetarás la dignidad de la Tierra y de todo ser humano?”“Como el obispo [de California] Marc [Andrus] apuntaba, hay realmente un breve cambio en la liturgia del LOC [Libro de Oración Común], que enfatiza que estamos en comunión con toda la creación de Dios además de las cosas que normalmente prometemos”, dijo la Rda. Melanie Mullen, directora de reconciliación, justicia y cuidado de la creación de la Iglesia Episcopal, en una entrevista con ENS durante la ecoconfirmación.“En general, la obra del Movimiento de Jesús incluye el cuidado de la creación”, dijo ella. Al elaborar materiales litúrgicos para honrar a Dios en la creación “aprendemos a orar las palabras de toda la creación de Dios en lo que hacemos”.Ello ayuda, afirmó Mullen, a llevar el servicio afuera.Fue la primera confirmación al aire libre de Curry, y fue “maravillosa”, dijo él. “En el comienzo de la creación, es el espíritu de Dios el que anida sobre el caos y genera orden y creación… la confirmación consiste en convocar a ese mismo espíritu que generó la creación a que genere una nueva vida en los que son confirmados de manera que el Cristo resucitado renazca igual en nosotros. ¡Eso es asombroso!”.Caren Miles, asociada de la Diócesis de California para formación de la fe, toma un selfie luego de la ecoconfirmación. Foto de Wilson/ENS.El Presidio de San Francisco, una antigua fortaleza militar de EE.UU., es parte del Servicio de Parques Nacionales. El lugar, en el extremo norte de la península de San Francisco, fue escogido [para la ecoconfirmación] por la vista (en un día claro) del puente de La Puerta de Oro y el océano Pacífico. Se escogió también porque es “un ejemplo del hombre labrando en la naturaleza en preparación de una guerra que nunca se produjo, y luego la naturaleza reclamando la tierra”, dijo Caren Miles, asociada de la diócesis para la formación de la fe, que planificó el oficio.La Diócesis de California y Andrus hace tiempo que participan en lo relativo al cambio climático y a la defensa de la justicia ambiental. Andrus ha representado al Obispo Primado en las negociaciones de Naciones Unidas sobre el clima, tanto en París como en Marrakech, Marruecos, y en la firma del Acuerdo de París.Gordon y Trillian Gilmore, miembros de la iglesia de San Miguel y Todos los Ángeles/el Espíritu Santo, en Concord, California,  comparten un momento de asombro: Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.Durante el oficio de ecoconfirmación, el obispo de California Marc Andrus le pidió a los presentes que meditaran en el asombro y en el mundo natural.“El asombro puede llevarnos a una relación más profunda con la naturaleza, es un don de Dios desde el comienzo del universo para ayudarnos a relacionarnos los unos con los otros, con el mundo y con Dios”, dijo Andrus, antes de invitar a la congregación  a que meditara en un momento de asombro, lo que experimentaban y cómo ese momento los cambiaba.Para Gordon Gilmore, su momento de asombro se produjo cuando vino a California por primera vez. Conducía por la Autopista 37 y vio el sol poniéndose en las marismas [cubiertas] de salicornias. La carretera hace una media luna a lo largo de la costa norte de la bahía de San Pablo al norte de San Francisco y atraviesa un refugio nacional de la vida salvaje creado hace más de 40 años parar proteger a las aves migratorias y al hábitat de los pantanos.La esposa de Gilmore, Trillian, también escogió el ocaso como su momento de asombro. Para ella fue mientras conducía hacia el oeste a través de la Sierra Nevada y observaba la puesta del sol múltiples veces durante 45 minutos mientras bordeaba los picos de las montañas”, contó.“Era hermoso”, dijo.-Lynette Wilson es jefa de redacción de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA center_img Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Environment & Climate Change Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT last_img read more

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Indiana Soybean Harvest Lags 5 Year Average

first_img Facebook Twitter Indiana Soybean Harvest Lags 5 Year Average Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Indiana Soybean Harvest Lags 5 Year Average SHARE Previous articleUSDA Announces Grants for Producers of Specialty CropsNext articleFarm Bill Expiration Becomes Political Football Andy Eubank By Andy Eubank – Oct 1, 2012 SHARE Harvest of both corn and soybeans rapidly advanced during the week with only minor delays due to scattered rain showers and heavy morning dew, according to the Indiana Field Office of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service.  Corn harvest is running about 8 days ahead of the 5-year average pace, while soybean harvest lags about 2 days behind the average.  Many farmers have been reluctant to store corn on the farm due to fears of aflatoxin contamination.  Tobacco harvest is nearing an end for some producers with close to average yields reported.  Planting of winter wheat is well underway and will gain momentum as farmers finish harvesting corn and soybeans.Field Crops ReportThere were 4.4 days suitable for field work during the week.  Ninety-one percent of the corn acreage is mature compared to 61 percent last year and 70 percent for the 5-year average.  Thirty-five percent of the corn acreage has been harvested compared to 26 percent last week, 9 percent last year and 22 percent for the 5-year average. National corn harvest jumps from 39 percent last week to 54 percent.By area, 28 percent of the corn acreage has been harvested in northern Indiana, 30 percent in the central region, and 61 percent in the south.  Corn condition is rated 11 percent good to excellent compared with 33 percent last year at this time.  Moisture content of harvested corn is averaging about 21 percent.Eighty-eight percent of the soybean acreage is shedding leaves compared to 72 percent last year and 81 percent for the 5-year average.  Eighteen percent of the soybean acreage has been harvested compared to 10 percent last week, 4 percent last year and 22 percent for the 5-year average. The national soybean progress is at 41 percent, almost double a week ago.By area in Indiana, 20 percent of the soybean acreage has been harvested in the north, 19 percent in the central region, and 17 percent in the south.  Soybean condition is now rated 29 percent good to excellent compared with 41 percent last year at this time.  Moisture content of harvested soybeans is averaging about 14 percent.Livestock, Pasture and Range ReportLivestock remain in mostly good condition.  Pasture condition is rated 24 percent good to excellent compared with 19 percent last year at this time.  Late cuttings of hay have helped to increase forage supplies but some operations will still be short going into the winter months.Source: Indiana NASSlast_img read more

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Time to Begin Year-End Financial Planning

first_img Previous articleGet Corn Harvested During This Dry StretchNext articleBiden or Trump: What Does the Future Hold for Farmers on the HAT Tuesday Podcast Gary Truitt Home Indiana Agriculture News Time to Begin Year-End Financial Planning Time to Begin Year-End Financial Planning Audio Playerhttps://www.hoosieragtoday.com//wp-content/uploads//2020/11/Bill-Lankswort-oct-2020-report-1.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.With harvest over, it is time to start collecting all those financial records. Bill Lankswert, Director of Business Strategies with AgriFinancial, says this is the best time of year to put together a financial picture.”It is very important for farmers to gather that information and get a picture of how they performed for the year.”That financial picture begins with an up-to-date balance sheet.“It is very important that the balance sheet be complete.”Lankswert says this includes the value of any stored crops you may have as well as any loans, short term or long term, that you have.Lankswert is the featured guest in the feature Money Minute, during November on Hoosier Ag Today stations.“Once you compile your balance sheet, it is important to compare your borrowing to your assets,” he states, “A lot of time farmers use short term loans for land and equipment, but long term loans are better used for these kinds of purchases.”He adds, with interest rates at low levels, locking in some term loans or re-financing long term debt is a good idea to consider.More information is available at cgb-agfi.com. SHARE SHARE Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Nov 2, 2020 Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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RSF reiterates call for independent probe into Maltese journalist’s murder

first_img Organisation News December 7, 2017 RSF reiterates call for independent probe into Maltese journalist’s murder Protecting journalists CorruptionConflicts of interestJudicial harassment A suspect exits the Law Courts in Valletta, Malta on December 6, 2017, after being charged with the murder of blogger and journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia / AFP RSF_en center_img Following this week’s announced arrests of ten suspects in Malta’s investigation into anti-corruption journalist and blogger Daphne Caruana Galizia’s murder on 16 October, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) reiterates its call for a full and independent investigation to bring those responsible to justice. Under European Union pressure for results, Maltese Prime Minister Joseph Muscat announced on 4 December that ten suspects had been arrested. They were the first arrests in the case, in which the government has been accused of both political interference and incompetence.Caruana Galizia’s family has issued a statement expressing astonishment that the arrests were announced by the prime minister and not by the police, as should be the case in this kind of investigation.The statement also draws attention to other irregularities, including the fact that the names of the suspects were released and that the magistrate who issued the arrest warrant was not the investigating magistrate in charge of the case.The family also said it was concerned that “a number of people who could be implicated continue to receive political cover for crimes they are widely reported to have committed.” As there was no sign that the investigation was being conducted in an independent manner, the family would continue to demand an “independent and impartial investigation,” the statement added.“In the nearly two months since Daphne Caruana Galizia’s death, the authorities have been unable to show that they are conducting their investigation in an impartial manner, so we support the family’s request and we call for an independent international investigation to establish all the facts of her shocking murder,” said Pauline Adès-Mével, the head of RSF’s EU-Balkans desk.The murder of Caruana Galizia, who often accused both Maltese government and opposition of corruption on her blog, has raised EU concerns about the rule of law in Malta.A European Parliament delegation tasked with examining the situation in Malta made an exploratory visit to the capital, Valetta, last week and confirmed its concerns on its return. There was also grave concern about the death threats made against members of the delegation ahead of the visit.Malta is currently ranked 47th out of 180 countries in RSF’s World Press Freedom Index. Protecting journalists CorruptionConflicts of interestJudicial harassment Help by sharing this informationlast_img read more

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Yesterdays HSE West Regional Health Forum meeting a waste of time – McBrearty

first_img Dail hears questions over design, funding and operation of Mica redress scheme Google+ Twitter HSE warns of ‘widespread cancellations’ of appointments next week By News Highland – September 29, 2010 Google+ Newsx Adverts WhatsApp Donegal Councillor Frank McBrearty has branded yesterdays HSE West Regional Health Forum a waste of taxpayers money.He says the members of the forum were to be briefed on what measures were being taken, but there were no specific details given, and Donegal members left the meeting no wiser about the extent of cuts at Letterkenny General Hospital yesterday.Cllr Mc Brearty was to have moved a motion calling for the resignation of Health Minister Mary Harney, but the meeting adjourned before the motion could be debated. He says he’ll move it again next month.He says the bottom line is once again, the people of Donegal will have to pay for the incompetence of others:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/fmb.mp3[/podcast] Facebook Yesterdays HSE West Regional Health Forum meeting a waste of time – McBrearty Previous articlePoverty conference hears appeal for actionNext articleDeputy McHugh questions differences between electricity costs North and South News Highland center_img Twitter Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Man arrested in Derry on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences released WhatsApp Dail to vote later on extending emergency Covid powers Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook PSNI and Gardai urged to investigate Adams’ claims he sheltered on-the-run suspect in Donegal Pinterestlast_img read more

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‘We Must Not Drop Our Guard And Say “Second Wave Is Gone”, We Have To Plan For Future So We Are Not Caught Napping’: Madras High Court

first_imgNews Updates’We Must Not Drop Our Guard And Say “Second Wave Is Gone”, We Have To Plan For Future So We Are Not Caught Napping’: Madras High Court Lydia Suzanne Thomas20 May 2021 9:42 PMShare This – xIn the course of its suo motu proceedings instituted to track Covid management in Tamil Nadu, Chief Justice of Madras High Court Sanjib Banerjee urged that preparations would have to be made for the future when the State Advocate General’s submission that there was an improvement in the Covid situation in the state.”We have to plan for the future also. We must also not drop our guard, and say ‘second wave is gone’! We have to prepare for the future, so next time we are not caught napping” , the Chief Justice said.In the hearing today, the Division Bench of Chief Justice Sanjib Banerjee and Justice Senthil Ramamoorthy, also remarked that the Centre’s statement filed today seemed a rehash of previous submissions. To this, the Additional Solicitor General Shankaranarayan replied that he would respond with a detailed report by Monday.The Court noted that the Centre’s statement showed no indication of allocation of vaccines and drugs in the near future or of any plan which is in place. With this observation, the Bench expressed a hope that a detailed report on the plan of action would be filed.On supplies of Drugs and OxygenThe Court took note of the submissions of Advocate General R. Shunmugasundaram and Puducherry Government Pleader that the State of Tamil Nadu and Union Territory of Puducherry were not receiving required amounts of oxygen. Referring a report filed by the Tamil Nadu Health Secretary, the Chief Justice pointed out that 100 MT of oxygen from the eastern corridor was not being delivered on a regular basis. The Advocate General averred that the State was able to manage with the existing supply. But Chief Justice Banerjee pointed out, “They (the State) are rationing, using concentrators for patients who are not serious, liquid oxygen for serious patients…”Taking note of the lack of supplies in the southern districts of Tamil Nadu, the Court said, “But Chennai is not Tamil Nadu…we need to augment resources in Southern districts”.In its Order today, the Chief Justice-led Bench directed that there was to be an increase in supply in Oxygen supplied to Tamil Nadu and Union Territory of Puducherry, and voiced a hope that the Centre has augmented supplies of oxygen so as to ensure equitable and enhanced supply to all states and Union Territories including the two (Tamil Nadu and Puducherry).The silver lining in this regard is submission by BHEL that it is going to open Oxygen plant”, the Chief Justice remarks in the order, again expressing a hope that the process was expedited.Counsel for the Sterlite Plant had also informed the Court that Sterlite has opened its plant in Thoothukudi, to supply Oxygen to Thoothukudi Medical College, which teh Court recorded in its order.Interestingly, after the Order was dictated, BHEL’s counsel attempted to clarify that the plant had not started producing oxygen yet, but was in the process of floating tenders for the same. However, the Court had logged out of the hearing by this time.On Vaccines The Court pointed out that the report filed by the state government indicated the commencement of vaccination drive for 18+ age group.”There may not be adequate supplies of vaccine…,” the Court said.Court also directed the State to get instructions on procurement of doses of Sputnik, which has are single doses. To concerns raised about whether booster doses would be required once persons received two doses of the vaccine, the Court directed the Central Government to respond. During the hearing today, Counsel had submitted that protection given by 2 doses of vaccine were believed to not last for even a year.”There needs to be some clarity in this regard from the Centre”, the Court ordered.On Testing Court referred to complaints that some of the Covid test results were being announced a day after or several days after the test results and that a person who tested positive many days before this would have been a superspreader during the time.Citing this, the Court instructed testing centers to declare results as soon as possible so that persons testing positive could isolate themselves immediately.On Crematoria ChargesChief Justice Banerjee, when dictating the order for the day directed the State to instruct local bodies to ensure there is an element of dignity when the last rites of any persons are performed.The Court said, “there are several reports of unlawful demands…local administration should come down heavily and ensure there are checks in place”On Sanitization In this respect, the Court referred to an affidavit submitted by the Greater Chennai Municipal Corporation on ill-effects of ‘wanton’ use of disinfectants and sanitizers.However, a drive ensuring cleanliness should be taken across the state…so far as use of sprays, disinfectants are concerned where garbage is dumped, and among those handling waste, the Court stipulated.With these directions, Chief Justice Banerjee declared that the matters would be taken up again on Monday.CASE: SUO MOTU V. UNION GOVT. OF INDIAClick here to download the OrderTags#Madras High Court Justice Senthilumar Ramamoorthy Chief Justice Sanjib Banerjee COVID -19 Next Storylast_img read more

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Britain trails US in flexible benefits

first_img Comments are closed. Britain trails US in flexible benefitsOn 8 Feb 2000 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article British business is lagging behind the United States when it comes tooffering employees flexible benefits packages.A survey found large and medium-sized companies in the UK are missing out bynot offering the packages to staff – even though experience in the US showsthem to be crucial in retaining staff.HR specialist Centrefile found just 11 per cent allowed employees to tailortheir remuneration package by choosing from a range of benefits.Only 15 per cent of the 200 companies surveyed planned to introduce policiesover the next two years. Centrefile managing director Bruce Thew said, “The type of benefitpackages companies offer are becoming ever more critical in attracting andretaining the best staff.”Yet the survey reveals relatively few organisations in the UK offerflexible benefits packages to supplement the traditional salary.”He added, “Corporate UK has not kept pace with the United States whereflexible benefits policies have become increasingly commonplace.” Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Going for the Jaguar

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Going for the JaguarOn 1 Oct 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article The revival of the ailing Halewood car plant on Merseysidehas been likened to a blood transfusion, replacing the corporate blue of Fordwith the green of Jaguar. Guy Sheppard discovers how training helped deliverenormous changesFor motorists, buying a Jaguar is a leap which many will aspire to. For themanufacturer, switching from a mass-produced car to a prestigious marque likeJaguar represents a huge change in company culture and working practices. Most of the Halewood plant on Merseyside was stripped bare last year whenproduction of the Ford Escort was replaced by Jaguar’s new X-Type. The newmanufacturing facilities cost £300m, but the transformation among the3,000-strong workforce was equally far-reaching, with each employee receivingan average of 350 hours of re-training. With the Escort’s fast-moving assembly line, tasks assigned to eachindividual would often only take a few seconds to complete. Under Jaguar, because of the new vehicle’s relative complexity, the taskstake much longer and require far greater skills. Phil Round, Halewood education and training manager, says the X-Typecontains sophisticated technologies such as fibre optics and satellitenavigation systems. “For auto electricians, for example, we had to move a group of peoplefrom very basic electronics to rocket science. With the Escort, it wasrelatively straightforward and people could manage with a basic set of tools.With the Jaguar, a more common tool would be a laptop for diagnostics.” Workers have had to adopt far higher standards of workmanship and learn newskills to meet the waste-free, low-inventory requirements of “leanmanufacturing” that Jaguar insists on. “In the past, you could leaveyour brain at the door, do your eight hours and then go home,” Round says.The task of training the workforce for this more exacting environment wasmade all the more daunting by Halewood’s past record. Productivity levels were low compared to Ford plants elsewhere in Europe andin the mid-1990s the plant was earmarked for closure. Although largely strikefree, industrial relations were far from harmonious. Outmoded Practices Halewood’s operations manager David Hudson, who was transferred fromJaguar’s West Midland headquarters, says relations were characterised by a”them and us” attitude. “We had to get rid of outmoded practices and persuade people to adoptmore flexible working patterns, with the emphasis on delivering quality. “Even more fundamentally, we had to get the workforce on side. We alsohad to overcome some understandable scepticism and convince them we wereserious about delivering change,” he says. One of the main planks of the training programme was, therefore, to create amore open and participative working environment. Tony Woodley, national automotive secretary for the Transport & GeneralWorkers Union, which led the joint union campaign to save the plant, says thechanges were too quick and unpalatable for some. “It would be dishonest to say there hasn’t been some pain,” hesays. “Employees were asked to buy into a new world and many hundreds werenot prepared to do that and left.” The changes in working practices at Halewood were achieved in 18 months,whereas in the West Midlands, similar changes were negotiated with Jaguar overthree wage agreements. The transition from Ford to Jaguar is described internally as a bloodtransfusion, replacing Ford’s corporate blue with Jaguar’s green. The process began in late 1998 after Halewood was announced as the productionsite for the new “baby” Jaguar, and the manufacturer’s managementtook over the running of the plant. Within a year, the Escort became Ford’s most improved product in Europe.Halewood employees began working alongside Jaguar engineers in the WestMidlands to prepare the X-Type for production. In the old days, the first time employees were familiarised with a new modelwas three months before “job one” – when the plant begins producingfor customers. “Nine times out of 10, it didn’t work,” says Round. The longer lead-in time allowed shopfloor workers to help decide how thevehicle could be built most efficiently. There is an immense amount ofexperience and skills from the Ford days and that, coupled with Jaguarengineering expertise, ensures the car is easy and safe to build,” saysRound. A seven-strong core training team was set up to deal with all aspects oftraining at Halewood. Weekly training meetings were attended by Hudson’s deputyand a training team member went to any launch planning meetings where therewere implications for training. Each member of the core team was given specificareas of responsibility within the plant and liaised regularly with theiropposite number in the West Midlands. To meet the new requirements of Jaguar, management concentrated on threeareas: quality, centres of excellence and culture change. To improve quality,the workforce had to adopt the standards that were already established in thecompany’s existing plants. As well as making individuals more responsible for the standard of theirwork, they were reorganised into groups of six or seven, half their formersize. Empowered”We have empowered the group leaders to deal directly with theengineers and the suppliers,” says Round. Almost every employee visited Jaguar’s other plants and around 500 spentthree months there absorbing its working techniques and culture as well asdeveloping efficient processes for building the new cars. Some went as”product coaches” so they could pass these on to the Halewood workforce.The centres of excellence were set up to introduce new working practices ina gradual, controlled manner because it was felt that establishing uniformperformance standards at a plant the size of Halewood was simply too vast atask to tackle all at once. Round says, “Areas of the plant were set up so people could actuallysee what was going to be expected of them. In any change situation, it’simportant to show people at the earliest opportunity the new state you aretrying to get to.” Senn-Delaney Leadership, an international consultancy, masterminded theshift in culture that was needed. John Clayton, European managing director,says his initial impression was of a “dark, dirty, loud andnegative-thinking place in all directions”. He adds, “Different areas distrusted each other and people did not wantto be working there. “We did focus groups, primarily with non-management people. That gaveus clarity in what was causing it to be such an unhealthy culture. So much ofit was to do with history with everybody looking through old filters.” Three-day workshops were run for management and union leaders and then atwo-day version was rolled out to the rest of the workforce. Clayton says, “We don’t consider ourselves trainers. The workshop hasan experiential format with activities designed to catch yourself beingyourself.” The next step was to focus on how behaviour needed to change to create ahigh-performance environment with teamwork, mutual respect and accountabilityamong the areas covered. Clayton attributes much of the success of theworkshops to operations manager Hudson’s willingness to discuss these ideaswith each group. “He was scheduled to be there for half an hour andsometimes he would be there an hour and a half later.” Ten people from across the workforce, including four who were hourly paid,were trained by the consultancy to run the workshops. “Normally, we go for people with public speaking and presentationexperience to do this,” says Clayton. “But it carried so much moreweight coming from these people. If I had done it, they would have said, ‘Whois this American guy and what does he know about working here?’.” More facilitators were trained to run another round of workshops that lookedat how the new, smaller assembly teams could put the principles of continuousimprovement into practice. “If you are working with a small team, it’s sovaluable if you’re prepared to talk to other members about what they are doingwell or how they could do things more effectively,” says Clayton. The most critical phase of the transformation was immediately after Escortproduction ceased in July 2000. With an eight-week gap before production of thenew model started, a wide-ranging training programme was adopted for most ofthe workforce. It was devised to emphasise the difference between building ahigh volume car and an upmarket one like the X-Type. Nearly 900 employees spent 10 days at a local college developing foundationskills such as literacy, numeracy and computing. These were all relevant tomeeting the requirements of lean manufacturing where working practices arestandardised to cut out waste and achieve consistently high quality. Round says, “If you had gone down the assembly line in the heyday ofthe Escort, you would not have seen it because there was so much stock about.The concept of lean manufacturing is actually based on doing things less; youeconomise on the lay-out and the stock you use.” A week was devoted to lean manufacturing issues led by plant supervisors andgroup leaders who had been trained to coach hourly paid employees. Time was also devoted to discussing Jaguar’s heritage and the competition itfaced around the world. An entire week was spent on 19 projects to benefit thelocal community, ranging from clearing gardens on a run-down council estate tobuilding a Chinese garden in a local primary school. Round says there were two main spin-offs from this work – underliningJaguar’s involvement and commitment to the local community and bonding the newworking teams together. It also helped break up time spent in the classroom. “We were consciousof the fact we did not want to sit them down in a classroom and bombard themwith facts week after week,” he says. “We had an individual training plan for every employee group, and thatmeant a lot of juggling to fit in all the visits to colleges, visits to Jaguarand classroom teaching at Halewood.” The final phase of the training programme lasted until February whenproduction for customers began. The time was used to fine-tune the production processes and ensure that allthe theory learned in the previous months was being put into practice. Thisinvolved assessing each person’s ability to carry out specific tasks related tothe training given. Candidates who failed to achieve the minimum standard weresingled out for further training. This procedure now forms part of a twice-yearly assessment of career andtraining needs which supervisors carry out with every shopfloor operative. Halewood is currently producing 400 cars a day and is on target to reach theeventual output target of 100,000 a year. According to Round, training colleagues from the West Midlands say Halewoodalready mirrors the standards and procedures established in their plants. InJuly, the plant achieved Investors in People status. His tip for anybody else attempting such an ambitious transformation projectis to keep in mind the big picture – his team’s mission statement is to providethe workforce “with the necessary competences to safely build the bestquality vehicles in the world”. He also says it is necessary to establish what skills and qualities theemployees have got and ask whether they will be sufficient for any new demandsthey will face. “Very often, people resist change not because they don’t want to, butbecause they lack the skills and qualities that are needed,” he says. last_img read more

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ESPS Rayo Ensures Safety of MV Royal Grace on Way to Salalah

first_img View post tag: Naval View post tag: Navy View post tag: Salalah After MV Royal Grace was released by pirates on Friday 8 March, it was EU Naval Force Spanish Offshore Patrol Vessel ESPS Rayo who ensured that the chemical tanker and her crew stayed safe as the vessel sailed north towards Omani waters.ESPS Rayo was conducting counter piracy patrols last Friday 8 March, when she was tasked to take over the role of escorting MV Royal Grace to safer waters from EU NAVFOR flagship ESPS Méndez Núñez.  Royal Grace had been held in a pirate anchorage for over a year close to the northern Somali coast after been pirated on 2 March 2012.As ESPS Rayo escorted MV Royal Grace, the Spanish Navy sailors provided food and water and medical assistance as required.MV Royal Grace is now safely berthed in the port of Salalah. In a farewell to the ESPS Rayo, the crew of Royal Grace thanked the Spanish warship’s crew for the protection and support they had provided.Speaking about the 4 day escort given to MV Royal Grace, the Commanding Officer of ESPS Rayo said “My ship’s company and I were delighted to be able to provide a safe escort and reassurance to the crew of MV Royal Grace.  These men have suffered for so long, soon they will be reunited with their families.”[mappress]Naval Today Staff, March 15, 2013; Image: US Navy Share this article View post tag: of View post tag: safety March 15, 2013 View post tag: ESPS View post tag: M/V View post tag: way View post tag: Rayo View post tag: ensures Back to overview,Home naval-today ESPS Rayo Ensures Safety of MV Royal Grace on Way to Salalah View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Defense View post tag: Royal View post tag: Defence View post tag: ON ESPS Rayo Ensures Safety of MV Royal Grace on Way to Salalah View post tag: Gracelast_img read more

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