Gym Rules Part II

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Positions – Spend time learning and adapting your body to the correct position for each stage of the lift e.g. the bottom and top of a front squat.Movements – Reproducing the correct movements between those positions e.g. keeping your knees out over your toes and back flat when moving from the bottom position to the top position of a front squat.Speed – Once you are happy with the positions and movements you can increase the speed between positions remembering to be under control at all times. Rugby is played at speed and you need to be able to move weights at speed while maintaining correct technique.Weight – You can then progressively add weight to the bar as long as you are able to maintain your positions, movements and speed.9. Limit the gimmicks – kettlebells, sleds, fat bars, chains and resistance bands added to the barbell are just a few of the diverse range of tools being seen in gyms.  Many have come from the world of Powerlifting where the athletes need the variety to break plateaus.  You need to be so strong that straight strength training is no longer effective before you break out the chains and fat bars!10. Be safe – Always check the equipment and environment each time you train.  The last thing you want is to be squatting 180kg and the sleeve of the barbell to be loose and fall off or to slip on a wet floor! Try to train with partners who can spot you on lifts, particularly the bench press. Remember training in the gym is supposed to make you a better player not put you in the Medical Room! 8. Positions, movements, speed, weight – With any lift particularly when you are learning something new use this progression.center_img England doing some gym style trainingCheck out Part I here6. Maximise your time – Use the big lifts – You can train every major muscle and movement pattern if you use the compound lifts (those that use more than one joint) like squats, deadlifts and standing presses.Not only will this save you time it trains the body to co-ordinate the use of all the muscles together which is what you need to do on the pitch.  Avoid machines if you can and use free weights which promote balance, co-ordination and overall strength rather than isolated strength.7. Maximise your time – Active Rest. Don’t sit around chatting between sets, use your time productively! Use time between exercises to work on any weaknesses you have such as balance, catching, passing or stretching (e.g. stretch your tight hamstrings out between bench press sets as this will not interfere with that lift).last_img read more

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Winner takes all as Herts meet Gloucestershire for Twickers final

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS LONDON, ENGLAND – MAY 30: Captain Matt Riley of Lancashire holds the Bill Beaumont Cup Trophy with his team mates as they celebrate winning the Bill Beaumont Cup Final between Lancashire and Gloucestershire at Twickenham Stadium on May 30, 2010 in London, England. (Photo by Jan Kruger/Getty Images) 2010 Beaumont cup winners – LancashireHertfordshire will play for a Bill Beaumont Cup final place at Twickenham Stadium when they host pool rivals Gloucestershire at Old Albanian RFC this Saturday (May 21, kick off 3pm).Both teams have two wins out of two in the south pool of the top division of the County Championship, and the winner-takes-all meeting near St Albans will decide who goes through to meet the winners from the northern group, Cheshire or Lancashire, at the Home of England Rugby on May 29.Herts maintained their fine form with the county’s record win over Kent, 48-7 with six tries to one at Westcombe Park RFC last Saturday (May 14). Building on the previous week’s first ever win in Cornwall, captain Brett McNamee and his side outperformed Kent in the key areas of defence, counter attack and support work.center_img Honours were even in the set pieces, but the aggressive tackling of the Herts back row and backs constantly disrupted the Kent possession to snuff out the attacking potential of their backs.In contrast the Herts backs and forwards, led by excellent performances by the half backs, James Shanahan and Stefan Liebenberg, combined well to attack or counter attack at almost every opportunity, which resulted in three tries in each half.Hertfordshire, 48-7 v Kent: Richard Gregg (Old Albanian); Ian Crompton (Hertford), Chris Lombaard (Old Albanian), Stuart Smart (Hertford), Chris May (Old Albanian); James Shanahan (Old Albanian), Stefan Liebenberg (Old Albanian); James Ellershaw (Old Albanian), Brett MacNamee (Hertford, captain), Rob Schillaci (Hertford), Craig South (Hertford), David Shotton (Tring), Lawrence White (Old Albanian), Chris Rainbow (Hertford), Josh Corcoran (Hertford). Replacements, all used: Wes Cope (Old Albanian), Alex Brown (Old Albanian), Arran Macdougall (Hertford), Torran Macdougall (Hertford), Ollie Cooper-Miller (Old Albanian), Tom Newton (Tring), Zac Vinnicombe (Old Albanian).Scorers: Hertfordshire: tries: Lombaard 2 (15 and 75 mins), May (20), Crompton (39), Liebenberg (56), Cope (59); cons: Gregg 3, Smart 3; pens: Gregg 2. Kent: try: May (79); con: Humphries.RFU County Championship – Bill Beaumont Cup 2010-11Pool 1 South May 7: Cornwall 18 Hertfordshire 25, Gloucestershire 33 Kent 26May 14: Gloucestershire 44 Cornwall 23, Kent 7 Hertfordshire 48May 21: Hertfordshire v Gloucestershire, Kent v Cornwall. Pool 1 North May 7: Lancashire 46 Warwickshire 12, Yorkshire 10 Cheshire 18May 14: Lancashire 26 Yorkshire 15, Warwickshire 15 Cheshire 36May 21: Cheshire v Lancashire, Yorkshire v Warwickshire.Bill Beaumont Cup Final, Sunday May 29, at Twickenham Stadium, 4.30pm:Pool 1 South winner (Hertfordshire or Gloucestershire) v Pool 1 North winner (Cheshire or Lancashire),last_img read more

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England U20 to play Baby Blacks in Junior Final

first_img England U20 v New Zealand U20 IRB Junior Championship Final 2011England stand between New Zealand and a fourth successive IRB Junior World Championship title after both sides came through tough battles with France and Australia respectively at the Stadio Comunale di Monigo in Treviso, Italy, on Wednesday.Runners up in 2008 and 2009, England were the first to book their place in Sunday’s final after digging deep to overcome France 33-18 in a semi final that was as tight and tense as expected. Tries from Christian Wade, the outstanding George Ford, Ben Ransom and captain Alex Gray saw England to victory, but they were made to work hard by France for a ninth consecutive victory under coach Rob Hunter this year.New Zealand were not given an easy ride by Australia in the other semi final, despite a seemingly one-sided looking 37-7 scoreline, with their opponents a far tougher prospect than that beaten 62-17 by the Baby Blacks in last year’s final in Argentina.Australia opened the scoring through Chris Kuridrani after starving the champions of possession early on, but with Gareth Anscombe directing play New Zealand responded with 37 unanswered points to make it 19 matches unbeaten in the Championship’s history.Away from the semi finals, Fiji sprung the surprise of the day by beating Wales 34-20 to earn a fifth place play-off against South Africa, the 57-15 conquerors of Ireland, and with it their best ever finish.Scotland, meanwhile, picked up their first win of the tournament by beating Tonga 30-11 and they will now face Argentina for ninth after they held on to beat hosts Italy 12-8.A fourth successive defeat at JWC 2011 means that Italy and Tonga now face each other in a must-win match with the loser relegated to the IRB Junior World Rugby Trophy for 2012 to be replaced by Samoa.England U20 captain Alex Gray said: “To be involved in any final is a massive honour, the boys have worked so hard to get to where we are. We started out as a group back in September with the ultimate aim of winning both the 6 Nations and the Junior World Championships. We won the 6 Nations back in March and now we’ve got a chance of winning the JWC.“The semi-final against France was tough, as we always knew it would be. They gave us a good game in the 6 Nations and they were only going to get better.  We’re delighted to pull the win out of the bag though, they made it a bit nervy for us at times, but fortunately we held out for the win.“We can’t wait for the final now – New Zealand have an aura about them but they definitely aren’t unbeatable. They sweat, they bleed – they’re human, so if we go out there with the right game plan then I’m confident we can give them a run for their money. A final is a one off game, it’s all or nothing rugby and we’ve got a chance.“It will be my last game as an Under 20 player and I expect it will be pretty emotional. It’s been a long run, and a few of us have played together since we were with the Under 16s so it just gives us an added incentive to pull out all the stops when we play the Baby Blacks.” PADOVA, ITALY – JUNE 18: New Zealand perform the Haka during the IRB Junior World Championship match between Argentina and New Zealand at Plebiscito Stadium on June 18, 2011 in Padova, Italy. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images)TREVISO, ITALY – JUNE 22: England line up prior to the IRB Junior World Championship semi match between England and France at the Stadio Communale di Monigo on June 22, 2011 in Treviso, Italy. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Leicester Tigers fly half George Ford: “It was a really tough game against the French, but we prepared well and executed our game plan pretty well. France are a physical side who have an air of unpredictability so it was really pleasing to get the four tries and secure the win. They caught us out on a couple of occasions which made it close but we pulled through in the end.“It was nice to go over for my try – I don’t get many, but the phase play in the build up was excellent. We’ve got players who don’t know when to give up and the forwards looked after the ball very well and things just opened up for me, but there’s no way I’m taking any of the credit – it was a massive team effort.“We know that were in for a tough match against New Zealand in the final, but anyone can beat anyone on their day so we’ll prepare as well as we can and look to produce our best rugby. It will be our last game together as a group and we want to give it absolutely everything.“I’ve thoroughly enjoyed playing in the Junior World Championship. It’s a valuable experience and to be able to test yourself against the best players from across the world will stand us all in good stead in the future.”Saracens prop Mako Vunipola: “We went into the game knowing that France would be up for it, and they were. We played them in the 6 Nations but they upped their game for the semi-final and gave us a scare, but overall our hard work paid off.“The lead changed hands on a few occasions and maybe they surprised us a little bit, but we knew that they would come at us for the first 50 minutes and we had to weather the storm. Our defence held out and our attackers were clinical when it mattered, so I think we deserved it in the end.“New Zealand in the final will be a huge test for all of us, but they’re beatable – every team is beatable, no one has a right to win a game.  It’s our last game together as a group so we will be leaving absolutely everything out on the pitch and hopefully that will be enough, we’re just going to go for it.”London Irish centre Guy Armitage: “It was a great honour to be named in the starting line up for the semi, it was my first start so it was a bit of a baptism of fire but I enjoyed every minute of it. Having played France in the 6 Nations we weren’t totally in the dark about what they were about, but it was important not to get complacent and I think we showed real professionalism with our performance, we got the job done and we look ahead to the final now. “New Zealand did very well in their group stages, but Argentina and Australia have both given them good games, so we’ll be studying the videos and plotting a game plan to try and beat them – it’s a huge game for us and there’s a lot of excitement in the camp.“I got a good luck text from Delon (Armitage) before the game yesterday which was a nice touch, and I’m pleased for him to be named in the initial training squad ahead of the seniors World Cup, but for now I’m focusing on our final!” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Maori All Blacks cast aside Championship XV

first_imgDONCASTER, ENGLAND – NOVEMBER 17: Josh Bassett of the RFU Championship XV is tackled by Jamieson Gibson-Park of New Zealand Maori All Blacks during the RFU Championship XV and New Zealand Maori All Blacks rugby match at Castle Park on November 17, 2012 in Doncaster, England. (Photo by Paul Thomas/Getty Images) Black sea: Josh Bassett struggling to avoid the Maori All Blacks’ defenseBy Richard GraingerCHAMPIONSHIP CLUB rivalry was put on hold on Saturday when a select RFU XV took on the Maori All Blacks at Doncaster’s Castle Park.Despite going down 21-52, head coach Mike Rayer was full of praise for his side: “I’m extremely proud and it was all about the players today. We gave them a framework and they were absolutely terrific,” he told The Rugby Paper.“They emptied their tanks, as they said they would, and I couldn’t ask for any more. We showed good intent, backed ourselves and the score-line probably flattered the Maori. But they’re a class act and their offloading game was unbelievable.”The tourists, who were beaten by Leicester Tigers on Tuesday evening, found their form and ran in eight tries to record a 21-52 victory in front of a crowd of 4,956.Man of the match – Declan O’DonnellThe Maori side were slow to get out of the blocks, as the Championship XV started strongly. However, all the select XV had to show for their dominance in the opening quarter was two Tristan Roberts penalties.Waikato winger Declan O’Donnell, who was named Man of the Match, scored the opening try, but the Championship XV struck back with a try from home fullback Dante Mama, following good continuity from his forwards.Winger Kurt Baker and hooker Hika Elliot both scored tries to give the Maoris a 14-21 lead at the interval, after Roberts added a third penalty.But the visitors upped the tempo in the second half. First, fullback Trent Renata finished a good attack to touch down under the posts, and as the visitors started to dominate, Maori locks Elliot Dixon and Roman Graham both crossed the whitewash.Outstanding halfback Frae Wilson notched his second try of the tour before centre Jackson Willison burst through tired defenders to complete the Maori scoring.However, the final say went to the Championship XV, when Blues fly half Jake Sharp chipped the Maori defence for Nottingham winger Rhys Crane to collect the ball and dot down; Sharp added the extra points. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS For highlights of the clash, courtesy of the New Zealand Herald, click here.News of two appointments completes the Championship round-up this week.First, as widely expected, Rotherham Titans’ Chairman Nick Cragg confirmed the signing of Alex Codling as Head Coach.Cragg said: “We were delighted by the quality of candidate and the general level of interest shown in the post…Codling, who was capped once for England, has a wealth of coaching experience, most recently at London Scottish where he was both the forwards and defence coach. He told the Titans’ website: “I am honoured and thrilled to have been appointed as Head Coach of Rotherham Titans and can’t wait to get started. It is a club with a great tradition and passionate supporters. I share their passion for the club and this great game and will do everything possible to keep moving the club forward.”And finally, Doncaster Knights announced the signing of Clive Griffiths as Director of Professional Rugby at Castle Park.The former Wales international rugby league and rugby union player is currently the defence coach of the Canadian National team.“I am delighted to be back at Doncaster, I enjoyed my last tenure here before it was cut short too early”, Griffiths said. “Everything I love about the Club is still here and the future is still very bright… Our main focus as a Club is to get Doncaster Knights on the rise up the table.” Griffiths’ immediate challenge will be to get Doncaster off the bottom of the Championship table.Follow Richard Grainger on Twitter @Maverickwriterlast_img read more

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Hong Kong celebrates record Sevens series audience

first_img FIJI WON the on-field plaudits by sneaking past first-time Cup finalists Wales 26-19, to successfully defend their HSBC Sevens title. In a thrilling final, the South Sea Islanders scored four unopposed second-half tries to come back from a half-time deficit of 19-0. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS – / 12Credits: Rugby WorldmoreShowing image 1 of 12 Check out the final day’s highlights below, or click here for the highlights from the rest of the weekend… However, the entertainment wasn’t just limited to the field of play, the fans made sure they got noticed in a fancy-dress extravaganza, even attempting a record Harlem Shake…did we mention, hangover?last_img

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Dan Carter breaks the million pound transfer-window

first_imgDan Carter, the world’s most marketable fly-half has signed on the dotted line for a cool £1.25m three-year deal, as another milestone in professional rugby has been reached Moving on: Johnny Sexton has done his time at RacingBut Racing are an ambitious team, who plan to move into a hyper-modern mothership of a stadium in the centre of Paris. They don’t want convention and they don’t want dull. However his form is, Carter will be hauled out. Over and over again. Get his face out there, fill stands, get shirt sales, and get Jacky that “economic benefit”, baby.See, while Carter had some time out to travel, kiss babies and flog credit cards as he saw out a sabbatical not so long ago, no one forgot who he was or what he has done. He made his long-awaited start for the All Blacks against Scotland recently and with a few tackles, 29 passes and just three kicks out of hand, it felt more like the game was going on around him, but his track record is unquestionable. Scrap that. It’s highly marketable.He has 1,457 Test points – more than any other player. He has 102 caps. He has beaten Australia 18 times, South Africa 14 and England ten. He is the top points scorer in Super Rugby history. He has won titles with the Crusaders. TAGS: Highlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Exodus: Wallaby James Horwill will follow Carter to Europe as the Southern Hemisphere is drained of playersSo for all of this, you have to concede that if anyone was going to net such a pay day, it was probably going to be Carter. He may not be the fleet-footed player he was and he has a tough job ousting Aaron Cruden from the All Blacks starting line-up in 2015. But after a career of being a demi-God on New Zealand’s south island, maybe we’ll not begrudge him the move. Players like him and Australian lock James Horwill (who is joining Harlequins) coming over to ply their trade in Europe aren’t the bad guys; they are just the high-profile foot soldiers in an ever-expanding war for your attention. It may feel a bit dirty, but rugby is only going to get more hyped, more flashy, more costly.Dan Carter has bought into that in a big way. And as he has, maybe even someone as celebrated will be willing to adhere to Racing’s club rules and live on the outskirts of Paris, away from all the distracting bright lights. There’s enough of that in the fly-half’s life already. Thanks for everything: Dan Carter and NZ CEO Steve Tew will leave on amicable terms IT’S THE numbers that get you gasping.Dan Carter is off to join Racing Metro in Paris on a three-year deal in the aftermath of the World Cup. If the rumours are to be believed, Carter could earn as much as £1m per year. Just to set that into context, he would be the first ever rugby player to earn that much through a single contract – what he would also earn as an ambassador for undercrackers and global sporting brands is anyone’s guess.Want more context? Versatile sometime-fly-half JJ Hanrahan is allegedly considering a new €150,000-a-year deal with Munster, so you could stretch to saying Carter is worth over seven Hanrahans.The man holding Racing’s purse strings, property mogul Jacky Lorenzetti, told the press on Thursday: “Carter will be the best-paid player at Racing but also the least expensive because of the economic benefits.” And it is easy to understand what is meant by “benefits”.Open-field: Dan Carter will leave a the top international points scorer in historyThe incumbent marquee fly-half at Racing is Jonny Sexton. He is out at the moment with head problems, and reports say he could be out until mid-February. By that time he will be ensconced in the Ireland set-up. For their outlay, Racing haven’t been able to churn out as much rugby as they would have liked from the playmaker and in World Cup year, in his last season before returning to Leinster, Sexton will be gunning for success in green. The upside is Carter will not have distractions during an international window next season.It is unfortunate, rather than malicious, that Sexton won’t play week after week for Racing. However, with All Black centurion Carter severing ties with the New Zealand national team it means he can play whenever called-upon. Now, this will be Carter’s second stint in France and we all know he had a near allergic reaction to the word “fit” last time he played in the Top 14 – he made only five appearances for Perpignan.last_img read more

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Hotshots: Glasgow lock Callum Hunter-Hill

first_img TAGS: Glasgow Warriors LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS When did you first play rugby?At about eight, at my local club North Berwick. I loved it and was a front-row until I shot up in height in my mid-teens.When did things take off for you?I missed Scotland U16 selection but grew half a foot one summer and had a good game for Stewart’s Melville HS v Strathallan when some guys were watching. So I made Scotland U18 and was coached by Eddie Pollock, who has had a huge influence on my development.Who else helped you climb the ladder?My mum has been a driving force, and guys like Jimmy Moran and Bryn Lockie at Stewart’s Melville.Who did you like watching as a youngster?Nathan Hines, Johnnie Beattie, Ally Hogg. Also Simon Taylor, who I played against in a club game a couple of years ago. I have a photo of me aged nine getting his autograph!You were picked for the Macphail Scholarship to New Zealand. How did you find that?Fantastic. To be immersed in that culture for three months, improving your skills and off-field behaviours, was incredible. I played for Christchurch Colts and my mentor was (ex-All Black) Dominic Bird.What was the biggest benefit to your game?My ball handling was a weakness before but it’s a strength now. I think my breakdown clear-out is one area that needs to improve. Date of birth: 27 February 1997. Country: Scotland. Strong contender: Callum Hunter-Hill (right) is tackled in the U20 Six Nations Italy. (Photo: Inpho) Are you still in education?Yes, I’m in my first year at Glasgow University studying geography. It’s beneficial to be doing something on the side.Who are you playing for this season?As an academy player at Glasgow we get loaned out and I’ve been playing for Stirling County – a brilliant club. Plus Scotland in the U20 Six Nations.RW Verdict: Hunter-Hill is going up in the world – and not just because he’s 6ft 7in and still growing. A natural leader who captained Scotland U18 in last year’s FIRA/AER European Championship, he’s ready to kick on. First published in the April 2016 edition of Rugby World magazine.last_img read more

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For Mako Vunipola “It’s about making more impact”

first_imgThe sheer size. The work-rate. The leadership. Everything about England prop Mako Vunipola is immense at the moment. This feature first appeared in Rugby World magazine in January. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS This feature first appeared in Rugby World magazine in January.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. AS RELAXED as Mako Vunipola is, one idea makes him balk.“There’s no chance I’d get in a ball pit!” the loosehead prop says after it is revealed we toyed with the idea of taking him to a soft-play area.“I remember Brad Barritt doing one of those pictures – well, not with a ball pit but it was with a bowl of fruit – and he still gets haunted by that picture today.”There is no savaging as severe as that from your team-mates, even if you’re a leader. And according to those who see his influence every day at Saracens, Vunipola is one of the most vocal players at the club alongside the half-backs and captain Barritt.Despite missing all of the November Tests with England, Vunipola is also considered one of the very finest forwards in the global game. In fact, in our last issue of 2018, Rugby World contributors named him the best loosehead on the planet. Why? When you talk to those who have played with and against him, discussion inevitably turns to work-rate.Related: Mako makes the Six Nations team of the weekIt is a key subject in the context of his journey, because not everyone rated the prop’s engine earlier in his career. It was much the same for his brother Billy.The pair had to change perceptions, and, in truth, their natural dispositions.Big impact: Vunipola for Sarries v Saints (Getty Images)“I think back to when he first started at Saracens and he had always been an unbelievable rugby player, but he had to learn how to work hard,” says former team-mate Kelly Brown, now Sarries’ academy coach. “Now Mako works unbelievably hard.“His stats are just nuts, in terms of carries and tackles. He does all this and then he scrums on top of it. Plus, he’s an incredibly skilful player. So he reads the game in a way most other props can’t. He’s got the skills and the vision of a centre, so if you’re opposite him and it’s a one-on-one, he’s good enough to run through you. If you try to gang-tackle him, he’ll notice and pass out the back.“And then when he hits anything it’s brutal; he is very, very powerful.”It all sounds exceptional. Yet while Brown mentions 21 phenomenal carries in a tough, early-season win over Quins, the star himself takes a sideways look at the notion of racking up statistics.Cocking his head slightly, Vunipola says: “You speak about the volume of carries and the work around the field, but it’s maybe about making more impact. For me, getting back into the game is a massive thing.“Whenever I carry the ball my intent is to bust those tackles and make those line breaks. Obviously it would be nice for me to make some 50-yard breaks every game, but I know that is not a reality at the level we play at.Chasing it: Vunipola dealing with an errant ball last season (Getty Images)“It’s very difficult and I know it’s not just about me making those carries. It’s about being able to function within the team. Those carries aren’t the be-all and end-all. Hopefully my team-mates can see I’m working hard for them. And you want to make sure that you don’t do 14 carries when you could have done ten carries and those were (better).”Something else that was levelled at Vunipola early in his career was that he needed to work at the scrummage. Semtex ball-carries were stunning but he needed to sort his ‘bread and butter’.According to established wisdom, you only learn by loading up on reps in the scrum, which is what Vunipola has had to do in a pro career that began at Bristol and has seen him go on to represent the British & Irish Lions in six Tests. And remember, he only turned 28 in January. One coach, who has worked with and against Vunipola at the top level, says the prop isn’t one to puff out his chest or make a scene during a scrum session. But he will grab you for a chat to clarify his objective and what to work on.And according to one Test adversary: “Mako’s scrummaging has come on a lot. He gets in a great shape and doesn’t ‘kick his hips’ as much – that is pushing hips out so you can get more of an angle on the tighthead, to bore in.“He doesn’t try to do it all himself, either. He is more patient now and you can see that with Saracens recently.”Lions allies: Vunipola with Leinster and Ireland No 3 Tadhg Furlong (Inpho)The loosehead considers the changes he has gone through in the pressure pit of the scrum. “I have just got more confident with it really,” he concludes. “When I was younger, I would get a setback in a game – a penalty against me or something like that – and it would probably take me a bit longer to recover and work out what I needed to do. Now, obviously I’ve got good people around me who can help, but also I have experience of so many games, so I know what I can change and react on the go instead of waiting two or three more scrums before changing things.”There are fewer voices calling for Vunipola to get more scrum experience under his belt these days. And he will get to renew some tasty rivalries during the upcoming Guinness Six Nations, including one with his Lions cohort, Tadhg Furlong of Ireland, in round one. Many agree that the Leinster No 3 is the pre-eminent tighthead in the game and is an integral part of what Ireland have achieved in the past few years.Then again, no prop ever gets it their way all the time and every put-in is an examination. So in Rugby World Cup year and after missing a promising autumn with injury, these games will allow Vunipola to wrestle with the best again.Related: Six Nations table 2019As anyone who has taken part in a tectonic elite scrum will testify, the processes used at the fault line of the set-piece have to be spot on. Asked about how hard it is getting rhythm within a scrum, Vunipola says: “You go through it all in your head, ‘Did I do this? Yeah. Did I do that? Oh, no actually.’ That’s how you try to figure it out. It all happens quite quick. That’s where the experience helps because with it you figure things out straightaway.“I’m lucky to have played with Jamie George for a long time (with Saracens and England), and we’ve scrummed together a lot. So if he feels like I didn’t get my right shoulder up or didn’t get my hips aligned with his, he’ll say, ‘Do this’ and we’ll work on it together.”So what’s it like at international level, when you’re changing personnel often?“You try to work out people’s tendencies, but they’re all high-class players in their own right and they’ll have their own way of doing stuff. We all try to read off the same hymn sheet. It’s difficult. That’s probably the hardest thing: cohesion. Because you can have the world’s best scrummagers, but if you don’t scrum as an eight it’s difficult.”Brown, who lives near Vunipola, says the prop is a very willing host off the field – he is fond of the Tongan way, his friend says. Family is everything for him and the front door is always open. Now a parent, Vunipola can show his gentler side too. Despite sometimes lingering at training, as soon as he is home he will take seven-month-old son Jacob off partner Alex Johns’s hands.Family ties: With mum Iesinga and brother Billy (Getty Images)If there is sport on TV – soccer, rugby, NFL, basketball – Vunipola will be there, remote in hand. But he helps with the chores too. Sure, he is particular about hanging up the washing a certain way or immediately cleaning and putting away used dishes. But by the same token, if Jacob is crying, he exercises patience. “More than anything I try to keep Alex happy,” he laughs. “If the kid’s all right, the kid’s all right! He’s pretty easy.”Of course, with most children under one, the mood can change quickly. Is Jacob like his dad with regards mood swings? “Pretty much, yeah!” Vunipola reflects. “He actually is. He has a bit of a temper and I think that comes from me.”Really? “I have a temper, yeah. I’ve got better at controlling it but the people that I’m closest to can tell. It’s the little things that set me off really. On the pitch sometimes I can lose my head, but I’m all right at getting back to focusing. I’ll just focus on the small things, like a simple task. So in the game I will go, ‘What’s my next job?’”Internationally, the next job is Ireland in the Six Nations. And work-rate, perspective and leadership ability have all combined to ensure the prop is a must-pick for England.It looks like 2019 will be colossal for this big fella no matter what.last_img read more

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Australia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide

first_img A sporadic qualifier for the World Cup, Uruguay… Expand Australia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, GuideIt has become a cliché that you can never write off the Wallabies heading into a Rugby World Cup and while they had their moments in Japan, they ultimately got knocked out in the quarter-finals by England.How They QualifiedAustralia were one of the 12 automatic qualifiers for the 2019 tournament.Key PlayersDual scavengers Michael Hooper – their talismanic captain – and David Pocock can demolish attacks when selected together. There are numerous threats in the back-line, including the likes of Samu Kerevi and Kurtley Beale.Dynamic: Hooper and Pocock are two of the finest back-rowers in the world (Getty Images)The Coach – Michael CheikaPassionate, if volatile, Michael Cheika is set for his second World Cup, having bossed his boys to the final last time. The Aussie also coached Leinster to a Heineken Cup triumph.Mixed results: Cheika has had an up-and-down record as Wallabies coach (Getty Images)Major Work-onsAustralia inflicted a record defeat on New Zealand during the Rugby Championship but then failed to score a point against the All Blacks a week later. They have struggled to string together consistent results and can be prone to making errors.Australia Rugby World Cup Warm-upsSaturday 20 July 2019: South Africa 35-17 AustraliaSaturday 27 July 2019: Australia 16-10 ArgentinaSaturday 10 August 2019: Australia 47-26 New ZealandSaturday 17 August 2019: New Zealand 36-0 AustraliaSaturday 7 September 2019: Australia 34-15 SamoaRelated: 2019 Rugby World Cup Warm-upsAustralia Rugby World Cup GroupAustralia are in Group D alongside Wales, Fiji, Georgia and Uruguay. Related: 2019 Rugby World Cup GroupsAustralia Rugby World Cup Kit Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Familiar Foes: Australia will play Wales at the 2019 World Cup (Getty Images)Australia Rugby World Cup SquadMichael Cheika has named his squad for the tournament which is below:Forwards (17): Allan AlaalatoaRory ArnoldAdam ColemanJack DempseyFolau Fainga’aMichael Hooper (captain)Sekope KepuTolu LatuIsi NaisaraniDavid PocockIzack RoddaLukhan Salakaia-LotoRob SimmonsScott SioJames SlipperTaniela TupouJordan Uelese.Backs (14):Adam Ashley-CooperKurtley BealeBernard FoleyWill GeniaDane Haylett-PettyReece HodgeSamu KereviMarika KoroibeteTevita KuridraniChristian LealiifanoJames O’ConnorJordan PetaiaMatt ToomuaNic White.Related: 2019 Rugby World Cup FixturesPrevious World Cup Results and RecordAustralia’s Rugby World Cup Record: P53 W42 D0 L111987 Fourth1991 Champions1995 Quarter-finals1999 Champions2003 Runners-up2007 Quarter-finals2011 Third2015 Runners-up2019 Quarter-finalsFollow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Warren Gatland’s last major tournament until Wayne Pivac… Expand Japan 2019 was the Lelos’ fifth World Cup Here’s everything you need to know about Fiji… Australia always seem to raise their game for the World Cup, but fell at the quarter-final stage in 2019 Georgia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Australia Rugby World Cup FixturesSat 21 Sep Australia 39-21 Fiji (Sapporo). Match reportSun 29 Sep Australia 25-29 Wales (Tokyo) Match reportSat 5 Oct Australia 45-10 Uruguay (Oita) Match reportFri 11 Oct Australia 27-8 Georgia (Shizuoka) Match reportSat 19 Oct QF1 England 40-16 Australia (Oita) Match report Collapse Uruguay Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Contenders: Australia always up their game for the World Cup (Getty Images) Wales Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Expand Uruguay Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Fiji Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Wales Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Georgia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Fiji Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guidelast_img read more

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Top Point-Scorer In The 2020 Six Nations

first_imgRomain Ntamack – 22 pointsAdam Hastins – 18 pointsJosh Adams, Charles Ollivon, Dan Bigger, Owen Farrell – 15 pointsPrevious Top Points Scorers In The Six Nations2019 – Owen Farrell – England (59)2018 – Maxime Machenaud – France (50)2017 – Camile Lopez – France (67)2016 – Owen Farrell – England (69)2015 – George Ford – England (75)2014 – Jonathan Sexton – Ireland (66)2013 – Leigh Halfpenny – Wales (74)2012 – Leigh Halfpenny – Wales (66)2011 – Toby Flood – England (50)2010 – Stephen Jones – Wales (63) Expand Stay up to date with the point scorer standings for the 2020 Six Nations here Six Nations Bonus Points Explained Six Nations bonus points – we explain how… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Six Nations Fixtures 2022 Six Nations Table 2021 Top Point-Scorer In The 2020 Six NationsIt may not be an official award of any kind but being the top-scorer in a Six Nations tournament is an honour that deserves more recognition. Some of the finest kickers to play the game have held the honour and the question is, who will do so at the conclusion of the 2020 tournament? Below we have some names to look out for.England – Owen FarrellAfter their Rugby World Cup exploits England are one of the favourites to win the Grand Slam at the moment and if they perform at the level they showed in Japan, then Owen Farrell is almost certain to collect a lot of points across the five matches.Wales – Dan BiggarBiggar has made the kicking role his own for wales and if they collect another Grand Slam then it would not be a surprise to see the 30-year-old top of the pile.Ireland – Jonathan SextonHaving been top points scorer back in 2014, we expect Sexton to contend once again in 2020.France – Romain NtamackThe question here is if he Ntamack starts. He has shown his kicking ability in the past and he pops up with tries often, but with a new coach it is difficult to predict who will have start and who will have the kicking duties.Scotland – Finn RussellWith the retirement of Greig Laidlaw, Russell is expected to take over the kicking duties for Scotland.Italy – Tomasso AllanHe is an accurate kicker no doubt but Italy always struggle to score points so Allan may struggle to get to the top of the leaderboard.Top Point-Scorer In The 2020 Six NationsUpdated Standings Jonathan Sexton – 23 points Collapse Six Nations Fixtures 2022 Who is leading the way in the Six… Follow our Six Nations homepage which we update regularly with news and features.Also make sure you know about the Fixtures, Injuries, Table, Venues, TV Coverage by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram Six Nations Table 2021 Six Nations Bonus Points Explained Six Nations Fixtures 2022 The 2022 Six Nations… Expandlast_img read more

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