Church leaders in Wales unite against change in organ donation…

first_img The Rev. Carol Luther says: By Anna MorrellPosted Jan 25, 2012 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Tags Press Release Service Comments (2) Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ann Willis Scott says: Submit an Event Listing Comments are closed. Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Anglican Communion Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK [Church in Wales] The leaders of three church denominations in Wales are joining forces to oppose the Welsh government’s proposals to change the law on organ donation.Leaders of the Church in Wales, the Roman Catholic Church and the Wales Eastern Orthodox Mission on Jan. 23 sent a joint response to the government on its plans to introduce presumed consent for organ donation in Wales.The government published its White Paper, Proposals for Legislation on Organ and Tissue Donation, in November and public consultation continues until the end of January. The church response is signed by all the bishops of the Church in Wales and Roman Catholic Bishops in Wales, including Anglican Archbishop of Wales Barry Morgan and Roman Catholic Archbishop of Cardiff George Stack. It is also signed by Father Deiniol, Archimandrite of the Wales Eastern Orthodox Mission.While fully supporting the principle of organ donation, the church leaders outline their objections to presumed consent and urge the government to reconsider. They call for an independent body to conduct a genuinely open consultation considering a range of possibilities, without prior commitments to a particular legislative proposal. This should look at systems that include aspects of opt-in, opt-out and mandated choice.They warn, “If the proposals in the White Paper are not subject to independent scrutiny then there is a real danger that a change in the law would alienate a significant proportion of the public and undermine the positive image of organ donation and the reputation of Wales. For while a high rate of voluntary donation speaks of a culture of generosity, a system of presumed consent would “turn donation into action by default”.The key messages from the joint submission include:Organ donation is a profoundly Christian and positive act.The positive ethos of donation as a free gift is endangered by an ill-judged if well intentioned proposal to move from voluntary donation to presumed consent.Extreme concern that while responses are being invited on the proposals in the White Paper, the central proposal, which is the shift from donation to presumed consent, is presented as a fait accompli.The belief that changing from opt-in to opt-out would improve the rate of transplantation is not justified by the available evidence.  It should not be taken for granted that changing the law to a system of opt-out/presumed consent would increase the availability of organs for transplantation.The most effective way to increase rates of both organ donation and family agreement to donation after death is to encourage people to sign the Organ Donation Register and to talk about the issue with relatives and those close to them.The White Paper calls for a “soft opt-out” system in which the relatives will always be consulted, but the ideas of “consultation” or being “involved in the process” are ambiguous. The law needs to state unambiguously whether relatives will be able to refuse permission for the removal of organs.On Jan. 21 about 100 people attended a Church in Wales organized public meeting to discuss the morality of presumed consent. They heard view points from Morgan; Roy Thomas, executive chair of Kidney Wales Foundation; and Dr. Chris Jones, medical director of NHS Wales. It was held at St. John the Baptist church in Cardiff city center.— Anna Morrell is the Archbishop of Wales’ media officer. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Church leaders in Wales unite against change in organ donation law Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA January 25, 2012 at 5:25 pm I agree that organ donation needs to be closely monitored. The issues are different in different countries. As an American, I would very much like to make a gift of my organs when I die, but the complexities of capitalism make this a difficult decision. Currently, the free gift of my organ generates large profits in the medical industrial complex with no consideration paid my heirs; conversely, the donated organ is not presented as a free gift to its recipient. My body being a free gift from God, I cannot, in good conscience sell it for private gain. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ January 26, 2012 at 4:34 pm We can nitpick all we want, BUT…. it usually boils down to life or death. Why a dead person (or her family) would refuse life to another, is beyond me. If my kidneys are still worth harvesting after I’m done with them — have at it! Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more

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Tutu, Jefferts Schori discuss mission in the church

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ George McGonigle says: From left, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town Desmond Tutu and David Crabtree, a news anchor at WRAL-TV in Raleigh, North Carolina, and a deacon in the Diocese of North Carolina. Photo/Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town Desmond Tutu shared a personal story from his childhood during a mission-focused conversation May 19 at Washington National Cathedral, a story that has stuck with him for more than 70 years.The 30-minute, live webcast conversation between Tutu and Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori was moderated by David Crabtree, a news anchor at WRAL-TV in Raleigh, North Carolina, and a deacon in the Diocese of North Carolina. It is available on demand here.Tutu told a story about his mother, a poorly educated domestic worker, who cooked and cleaned for blind, black women during an age in South Africa “when blacks were ‘inferior,’ or so they were told,” he said, adding that on this particular day, when he was 8 or 9 years old, he was standing with his mother at her place of work.“I saw something that I never thought,” said Tutu in a soft voice. “There was a white priest in a long flowing cassock and he had a large sombrero hat, and as he passed he doffed his hat to my mother. White priest, black woman in apartheid South Africa…. For him it is the normal thing that you do for any woman. This is how he demonstrated that he believed that each of us is a God carrier … I wasn’t aware that it was something that would stay with me. I am 80 now.”The priest was Trevor Huddleston, a well-known anti-apartheid activist who later became archbishop of the Anglican Province of the Indian Ocean.“I still remember the impact of Trevor Huddleston’s doffing and that was acknowledging what we say in our theology, ‘you are created in the image of God and you are a God carrier,’ and that is what we in our proclamation seek to be saying….”Crabtree asked Tutu and Jefferts Schori to define mission, where the church is concerned, and “how we best carry it out.”“Mission is really making us all aware of the incredible love that God has for all of us,” said Tutu. “It says things like, do you know what, you don’t have to earn God’s love. God loves you, period, and everything flows from there.”Jefferts Schori said, as Tutu pointed out, that mission is about receiving love and then responding by going out into the world to spread that love.“It is a matter of calling the near and the far off together into the fold; it is about healing and reconciling; it is about making that love incarnate in the lives of people around us and in the lives of people on the other end of the earth.”The conversation centered on the Anglican Five Marks of Mission. Crabtree asked, in reference to the first mark, “To proclaim the Good News of the Kingdom,” how do you bring that proclamation to a world so in need of the message, but mired in doubt?The question reminded Jefferts Schori of an encounter she had some years ago in a nursing home where a woman was wearing a sweatshirt that read on the front: “‘Jesus loves you’ and on the back it said, ‘but I’m his favorite.’ We all have a sweatshirt like that. We are all God’s favorite. But we need people to remind us of that,” she said.The doubt, she continued, “is an opportunity for someone else to reach out and respond; it’s an opportunity to grow in your confidence that you are that deeply, and abundantly and eternally loved, but it doesn’t happen for most of us without that fleshly encounter.”What we seek to say in the proclamation, Tutu responded, is not that the world we live in is a paradise, but that we do have an omnipotent God who “waits for us that we will be coworkers with this God.”“And that is our privilege and our responsibility: to help turn this wilderness into the garden that God had always intended his world to be,” said Tutu, who served as archbishop of Cape Town and primate of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa from 1986 to 1996.The Anglican Consultative Council, the Anglican Communion’s main policy-making body, between 1984 and 1990 developed the Five Marks of Mission to offer parishes and dioceses worldwide a practical and memorable “checklist” for mission activities.The Five Marks of Mission are:1. To proclaim the Good News of the Kingdom,2. To teach, baptize and nurture new believers,3. To respond to human need by loving service,4. To seek to transform unjust structures of society, and5. To strive to safeguard the integrity of creation and sustain and renew the life of the earth.In reference to Tutu’s story about the respect shown to his mother by Huddleston, the second mark and the Baptismal Covenant’s promise to respect the dignity of every human being, Crabtree asked: “How do we better doff our hats to people?”Jefferts Schori, who early on had been educated in a Roman Catholic school and was taught to curtsy whenever encountering a nun in the hallway, said she learned a lot from monastic tradition, where in recognition of God you bow to your brothers and sisters in community.“If we walked through life in that way,” giving thanks and recognizing the image of God “everywhere we go, the world would work differently, very differently,” she said. “We live in a society that so often assumes enemy rather than image of God.”In response to a question from Crabtree about how best to meet respectfully the needs of others, Jefferts Schori talked about the necessity for self-compassion.“When we have a sense of our own wilderness and have some compassion for ourselves, we can then have compassion for others. It is essential to be able to see that wounded human being who is in need of partnership,” she said.“That is the only avenue when we can be co-healers, co-creators with God in responding to that wound. I think that is the salvation of the world. But it requires finding the vulnerability in your own soul.”Segueing into the fourth mark of mission, “transforming unjust structures of society,” Crabtree observed that finding that “vulnerability” can be “like swimming upstream” attempting to correct society’s unjust structures. “Yet you have to keep pushing bit by bit and trusting that God sees the pushing because we know God does see that …”Speaking from his experience as an anti-apartheid leader in South Africa and witnessing the oppression and injustice many faced, Tutu said there was a time when many in the world, and even some of the leaders of the movement themselves, could have said, “this ghastly system, there is no way in which we can overturn it.”“Well,” he laughed. “Remember what happened? People in South Africa did their thing, but it was very largely the support that we got from the international community, the anti-apartheid movement, you know those alliances that we had, young people demonstrating and working for divestment, and here we are today.“In the 1980s and even in the 1990s, many were saying no, the only way that thing is going to be resolved in South Africa is through an awful, racial bloodbath, but it didn’t happen. And it was because of an alliance of people around the world.”Tutu received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984 for his efforts to end apartheid. Following the fall of apartheid in 1994, he headed South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission.Crabtree, who had remembered seeing Tutu on ABC’s “Nightline” with Ted Koppel in the 1980s, asked him when he realized that he had to partner with God in fighting apartheid. “You didn’t just appear there you had already been in this fight for a long time,” Crabtree said.Again, Tutu laughed and said, “I don’t know. One, I suppose is to be careful what you ask God to do with you, ‘when you say here I am use me,’ and God takes you at your word.”He said that the success of the anti-apartheid movement was due to the outpouring of prayers from around the world, adding that he was just one person involved in a much larger community. “You knew you were part of something that would ultimately not be defeated,” he said.Regarding the power of prayer, in a follow up question posed by ENS following the webcast, Tutu said: “One of the wonderful things is that God does not usually let us know where our prayers really work on this side of death because we, like it or not, we’d get slightly swollen heads. But the fact that prayer works is not in doubt.”Also following the webcast, Jefferts Schori said the work she does is “undergirded by prayers and the strength comes from places that I don’t know where. And there is a sense of peace in the midst of it that comes, I believe, from the prayers of many, many, many people.“I cannot do the work I do without that. I could not do it without that. And it’s an immensely humbling experience to realize that.”At the start of the webcast, before moving the conversation to mission, Tutu took a moment to commend the Episcopal Church for its “generosity and gentleness of spirit” when it could have been “abrasive” in its response to recent challenges in the Anglican Communion.Crabtree wrapped up the conversation on mission by addressing the fifth mark, “To strive to safeguard the integrity of creation and sustain and renew the life of the earth.”“God set us in this garden to care for it because it is the source of physical life for all that is,” Jefferts Schori said.“Christians have unfortunately in our history often misunderstood dominion as taking it for private property. It’s about house-holding, husbanding, and housekeeping carrying for the stuff of creation.“It will be healed as we grow into a greater consciousness that we are all intimately connected … we are a dynamic community … and we cannot dismiss any part of it – the whole of its being is essential to our life and to the life of every other human being and every other creature on this planet,” she said.— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC February 11, 2013 at 11:24 am Why doesn’t Bishop Jefferts Schori mention the definition of mission found in the Catechism?“Q. What is the mission of the Church?”“A. The mission of the Church is to restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ.”(See page 855 of the BCP)The so-called “marks of mission” stated by the ACC are all important as activities in support of mission but unless the definition of mission is clear they are like “sounding brass and clanging cymbal”. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL May 21, 2012 at 7:53 pm I think we cannot excuse ourselves in any age from being equally responsible for acts of violence against one another, including in our words and conversation, our gossip and tale-telling. Those same newcomers to a new land were violent with those they met already here. The question posed remains: when will I see God in others first and always, not last and sometimes. I stand responsible constantly for my thoughts and words and actions. My fresh start is here and now. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service May 21, 2012 at 10:51 pm When I read such a well thought out piece such as this, I am reminded of the words of the hymn: “reclothe us in our rightful minds … and then may we like them (the disciples) without a word, rise up and follow thee.” “All will be well.” the Rev. Deacon Gini Hart says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tutu, Jefferts Schori discuss mission in the church A conversation at Washington National Cathedral Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Jim Hunt,Nicholas James Irwin Hunt says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Robert W Kley says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN May 21, 2012 at 5:35 pm If anyone finds it hard to see the image of God in the latest suicide bomber, just remember that as a Church we have been through a lot of that stuff, using force, as with Constantine wanting to make the Roman Empire Christian, and Elizabeth I and others wanting the whole country to be Anglicans! Then there were the Crusades. No wonder people went off to America to make a fresh start. Featured Jobs & Calls By Lynette WilsonPosted May 21, 2012 Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Jeffrey Knox says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 May 22, 2012 at 11:55 am I can never hear enough of these kind of discussions. Wonderful questions and answers. Thank you, Katharine and Bishop Tutu. Anglican Communion, Comments (6) Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Rev. Julianne Sifers says: Comments are closed. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Shreveport, LA June 7, 2012 at 1:06 pm Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and Archbishop Desmond Tutu: Thank you for your faithful expresion of Chirst’s calling to all persons to live lives of service that extend arms of love and healing in a world broken and hungry for hope.last_img read more

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Religious leaders seek inquiry into misuse of Pakistan blasphemy law

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ecumenical & Interreligious The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN [Ecumenical News International, Geneva] Christian, Muslim and Hindu leaders from Pakistan attending an international hearing on Pakistan’s blasphemy law said the law is leading to “blatant violations of human rights” and called for the government of Pakistan to investigate misuse of the law.About 90 participants from Asia, Africa, Europe, and North America, including Christian, Muslim and Hindu representatives from religious groups and human rights groups in Pakistan, attended the hearing at Geneva’s Ecumenical Centre from Sept. 17-19.“Tinkering with procedural amendments has not delivered,” said a communique issued on Sept. 19 “Therefore, we urge the government to constitute a competent Inquiry Commission immediately to look into the tragic consequences of the blasphemy law and suggest a way out of this difficult and embarrassing situation.”The International Hearing on Misuse of Blasphemy Law and Rights of Religious Minorities in Pakistan was hosted by the World Council of Churches’ (WCC) Commission of the Churches on International Affairs (CCIA). It was called to analyze the rise of religious fundamentalism and extremism and to seek effective response to the mounting number of cases of abuse of religious minority rights in Pakistan.The law includes clauses making criticism or desecration of Islam or the Prophet Muhammad a crime, in some cases punishable by death. Participants were told by Pakistani church and human rights advocates that although the death penalty has not yet been carried out, accused persons have been killed by mobs or forced into hiding, even if acquitted of the charges against them.Commentators in Pakistan have said the law is often misused, and people falsely accused, in disputes over business or property rights. The latest case, of a teenage girl accused of allegedly burning pages of the Quran, Islam’s holy book, has caused widespread outcry.The hearing coincided with meetings in Geneva of the U.N. Human Rights Council and included time for participants to meet with ambassadors and country mission representatives to raise awareness of human rights abuses due to misuse of the law.The WCC’s General Secretary, the Rev. Olav Fykse Tveit, welcomed the declaration and committed the WCC to following up on recommendations that fall within the global church organization’s mandate.Bishop Samuel Azariah, Moderator of the Church of Pakistan and WCC Executive Committee member, declared the results of the hearing “a new beginning for us in Pakistan.” Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET center_img Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Anglican Communion, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Washington, DC Religious leaders seek inquiry into misuse of Pakistan blasphemy law Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA By Kristine GreenawayPosted Sep 20, 2012 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more

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CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA: Deacons respond to Hurricane Sandy

first_img Rector Albany, NY Featured Events By Linda Arguedas Posted Dec 17, 2012 Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Hurricane Sandy Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ December 19, 2012 at 2:45 pm We are an amazing diocese – aren’t we? Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska December 18, 2012 at 4:36 pm Thanks to the generous people of our congregations who graciously responded to this appeal orgainzed by the deacons. Once again we are reminded how giving the people of our Diocese can be when asked to respond to our neighbors in need. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments are closed. December 17, 2012 at 4:44 pm The church needs more deacons, more foot-washers than table-presiders. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Callscenter_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Linda Arguedas says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ David Lovelace says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Loading the van with care packages are Bishop Nathan Baxter, Deacon Pete Gdula, Deacon Brenda Taylor and Adam Bentz, volunteer.Photo/Linda Arguedas[Diocese of Central Pennsylvania] Deacons in the Diocese of Central Pennsylvania answered a request made by Bishop Nathan D. Baxter to reach out to their fellow deacons in the diocese of New Jersey in response to Hurricane Sandy.“When our bishop wished for the diocese to make a response to the victims of Superstorm Sandy, the deacons were eager to meet the challenge,” said Archdeacon Molly Solbak, St. James’ Episcopal Church, Lancaster, and archdeacon for deacons for the diocese. “I recruited a deacon to set the program in motion in each of our seven convocations,” said Solbak. The bishop asked for personal hygiene items and small stuffed animals.The deacons quickly rose to the occasion by phoning every parish in their respective convocation, asking for each parish to collect and bag personal hygiene items and new stuffed toys.  Many of the parishes participated even though some already had other emergency storm responses in the works. Solbak made contact with the Diocese of New Jersey’s Deacon Carmen Viola who helped her make connections for help in receiving the items that were gathered.In less than two weeks, the seven deacons collected more than 500 stuffed toys and almost 70 boxes of personal hygiene items. On Dec. 15 Deacon Jack Hoffer of Trinity Church in Tyrone and volunteer Bob Jones, of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in State College, delivered the items to a warehouse in New Jersey for future distribution to those in need with hopes that the children who have lost much may have a teddy bear or toy this Christmas season.— Linda Arguedas is canon for communications and events in the Diocese of Central Pennsylvania.  Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (3) Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Moputo Jones says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA: Deacons respond to Hurricane Sandy Rector Shreveport, LA last_img read more

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Interactive timeline of the history of women’s ordination

first_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Tags AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis To interact with this timeline, close the introduction and use the slider at the bottom to scroll through the events. To explore an event, click on it. You will then have options to read the details, delve deeper and connect with related online resources.For a full screen version, click here. Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Philadelphia 11, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Mary Frances Schjonberg says: July 29, 2014 at 7:57 pm The Rev. Susan Slaughter’s ordination and that of the Rev. Suzanne Lynn Ward’s in the Diocese of San Joaquin, also in 2009, are both noted in the entry about the Rev. Margaret “Peggy” Lee. Rector Martinsville, VA July 29, 2014 at 5:42 pm Susan Slaughter became the first woman ordained to the priesthood in the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth on November 15, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. Edwin F. Gulick, Jr., provisional bishop of Fort Worth. She was ordained a deacon on Oct. 12, 2002. She was installed as the first woman rector by the Rt. Rev. Wallis Ohl, second provisional bishop of Fort Worth, on the same day she was ordained a priest. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Interactive timeline of the history of women’s ordination Rosemary Gooden says: Rector Smithfield, NC Joan Gundersen says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Rev Dr Ellen Barrett (Sr Helena,OSB) says: Columba Gilliss says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events July 28, 2014 at 7:45 pm Also in January 1977 the Rev. Ann Coburn and her husband Mike were ordained priest at St. James, Danbury CT. The Coburns had been deacons for several years, waiting for women’s ordination to pass. There was a massive turn out for the occasion, at which The Rt. Rev. John B. Coburn, Michael’s father, presided. Yes, there were a couple of the “men in black suits” who stood up and made objection to Ann’s ordination, but Bp. Coburn was well-prepared, succinctly responding to the objection and dismissing it. I recall reporters from the NYC news media in the church’s balcony, and our concern as to whether it would actually hold them up! As a new Episcopalian then, I had no idea of the significance of the occasion, although I was glad to be on the front row of the choir and able to see everything first hand. Later I came to appreciate deeply having been present for that historic event, and added deep admiration to the liking and respect I already for Ann. When she celebrated her first eucharist I was present, and it crossed my mind for the first time, that possibly I, too, might be ordained one day. Fifteen years later, on the occasion of my own ordination to the priesthood, I was profoundly thankful for the grace of having been present at Ann’s ordination and for having experienced her ministry. September 17, 2016 at 5:40 am I too was ordained priest in January 1977 (on the 10th by Bishop Moore). Columba Gillis and I were clasmates at GTS a year behind Page and Peggy. Jeanette Piccard was at General with us in our Junior year. Annette Ruark (aka Anne Hazen) was ordained that same night at Holy Apostles, Manhattan. Columba sang the Gospel as deacon. Carter Heyward, who had been ‘received into her [priestly] order’ the night before was my priest presenter. I was present at both the 1973 and 1976 General Conventions and at Barbara Harris’s Consecration to the Episcopate. Many of the women mentioned on this timeline were/are known to me and should receive far more recognition than they have for making the Episcopal Church a more dynamic and inclusive outpost of the Jesus Movement. I am glad to see this timeline–as an historian I would like us all to be aware of our foremothers and never take for granted what they have made possible for so many more. ‘There were giants in the earth in those days!’ However, it is equally true that ‘la lucha continua!. God bless you all. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Peggy Muncie says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Women’s Ministry, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Katie Sherrod says: Nancy Platt says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC August 28, 2014 at 8:54 am I’m another of the January ’77 priests. Bishop Wetmore ordained me in St. Ann’s Church for the Deaf in New York on the 30th. It was a deaf service. I had sent word to those who had protested at previous ordinations in the diocese asking them to contact the seminarian who would be interpreting for the bishop and other hearing people and although one or two did stand in protest none of them spoke. I am particularly grateful to the deaf priest who preached and others who came.Columba Gilliss Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls April 6, 2016 at 5:19 pm Thank you for sharing this information. There is a typo, however, in the date for Page’s ordination, which I assume was 1977. You wrote 1777. Oh well, I guess it doesn’t matter. Everyone will know the date. I am writing a biography on Bishop Walter Dennis. I’d like to know what your experiences with him were like as well as any additional information you may wish to share. My book include’s a chapter on women’s ordination. You may reach me at the Diocese of Chicago. The bishop’s assistant will give you my contact information. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 September 16, 2016 at 10:05 am Beryl Choi was another of the January 1977 ordinands. She was ordained in Pittsburgh by Bishop Robert Appleyard on January 9. Press Release Service March 11, 2016 at 4:14 pm I was GTS’s first woman graduate along with the now late, Page Elizabeth Smith Bigelow. She was ordained deacon in June of 1974 in Diocese of Newark.I was ordained deacon June 15, 1974 in Diocese of Long Island. Page was priested in January of 1777. I being 8 months pregnant in January waited untilApril 25, 1977. I was ordained in the chapel at Vassar College where I served on the campus ministry team. I was ordained for theDiocese of New York howeverBishop Moore asked my Bishop since postulancy, The Rev Jonathan Goodhue Sherman to ordain me.Despite a protest on Long Island, there were over 45 priests laying hands on my head and welcoming me to the sacred order of priests.A special moment. When the Bishop processed in his chaplain carried the entire file of my seven years of preparation. He moved to the altar and placed the file in the center as if to dare anyone to object. Not a voice did. Praise God for that moment and every moment of the journey. Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Comments (10) Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Rev. Peggy Blanchard says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ September 17, 2016 at 7:37 am I was among the 35 women ordained else where because of the Montgomery Model. He and the Standing Committee of Chicago refused to testifyto the suitability of a woman for ordination to the priesthood. Although Biship Primo would have ordained us, the Standing Committee’s behavior stopped all of that and we had to seek other Dioceses. I went to Massachusetts, Bishop Arnold came to Chicago to ordain me and then none of us were allowedto return to Chicago on paper for 6 months. Nothing changed until Bsp Griswold came to Chicago as Bishop about 4 years. Nice to have the timeline remembrance. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Women’s Ordination 40th Anniversary By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 28, 2014 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MSlast_img read more

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On our way rejoicing

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL [Diocese of Dallas] Whether reciting the liturgy in Igbo, sharing the chalice with the homeless or discovering the Canterbury Trail, all illustrate the rich vibrancy of the Dallas diocese where 11,300 believers sit in the pews each Sunday to worship.Church planting, urban renewal, population growth and renewed excitement toward all things Anglican have buoyed the 69 congregations in the diocese and kept parishes and missions growing or stable. This is an important feat, particularly during a time of transition as leaders search to replace recently retired Bishop James M. Stanton.While no one thing is credited with keeping the diocese robust, strategic church planting is its lifeblood. New churches are being created in rural outposts, the inner city, and in the suburbs.“Culture changes, neighborhoods change and so there is always a need for new church plants,” said The Rev. Brendan Kimbrough, who is launching a new church in Collin County. “If we want to reach people through Christ, the most effective way is through church planting.”Kimbrough speaks from experience. He began sowing the seeds of St. Timothy’s nearly two years ago in effort to make an Episcopal Church accessible to residents in the towns of Murphy, Wylie and Sachse.After two years of meeting residents and holding Bible study in his home, Kimbrough is officially launching St. Timothy’s in August in the Murphy Activity Center. “It’s a perfect space, and will allow us to have full worship, a nursery, children’s Sunday school, a hospitality area and plenty of parking.”Establishing new churches isn’t easy and requires substantial support from the diocese in both funding and management, said Canon Victoria Heard, missioner for church planting.Starting from scratch is hard work for the priest who has to parachute into a new community with little more than a dream and a prayer. Heard points to the Rev. Michael Gilton, as a successful planter who started St. Paul’s in Prosper, which now has 130 in average Sunday attendance.“Father Gilton did most things right,” Heard said. “He moved to Prosper, where his first act was to become a crossing guard at a school, which helped get him connected to the community. Then he joined the Rotary Club. You really have to be visible as a church planter because you don’t have a pretty building. You just have yourself, Jesus Christ and a vision of what could be.”While many new congregations are built chasing suburban growth, inner city growth is more complex. In Dallas, the diocese’ largest parish is undergoing a massive construction project, while just a few miles away, a parish for the homeless continues to grow in both membership and mission. And in the Oak Cliff neighborhood, urban renewal has inspired the reconfiguration of three parishes.At the Church of the Incarnation, in Dallas’ Uptown neighborhood, members raised $26 million for a construction project that will double the church’s footprint, and better meet the needs of a rapidly growing congregation that already numbers 1,350.“We have been forced into it,” Bishop Tony Burton said. “We don’t have room to start another Sunday school class. People keep coming and we don’t have the space. We had to build. We want to fulfill the mission of the church to worship God in the great tradition, make disciples, serve the poor and raise up leaders…. .”The construction is expected to be completed next year, and will include a new worship space for the contemporary service, a new welcome center and two new educational buildings.The growth is in part due to more families moving to the Uptown area, and the easy access provided by Interstate 75 that makes the location convenient for those outside the immediate neighborhood, Burton said.A few miles away, an outdoor church servicing the homeless continues to flourish and expand its mission of helping others. The Gathering, which provides an extended Eucharist with lunch in a downtown park, was started in 2012 and averages 100 worshippers on Sunday.“It’s a parish community without walls,” said Tom Hauser, executive director of The Gathering. “We have liturgy, we have communion, and we have a proper sermon with the appropriate liturgical colors. We are proclaiming the same gospel as the Church of the Incarnation, but at the same time we are less formal. We have to be, some of our people don’t have shoes.”Homeless members of the parish have gone on three mission trips – twice to Oklahoma to help rebuild homes that were destroyed in tornadoes and once to Camp All Saints to help get the grounds ready for summer campers.In Oklahoma, “it was the homeless helping the homeless,” said the Rev. Charlie Keen. “They worked their butts off. On the way home they talked about what a blessed experience it was and then when we got back into town, instead of taking them home I dropped them off at a park — they don’t have homes.”While The Gathering offers access to urban ministry, so do the changing demographics of older neighborhoods such as Oak Cliff. Recently, three parishes with dwindling congregations united into one parish in a neighborhood that is experiencing urban renewal.The congregations of Epiphany, St. George and St. Paul merged to form St. Augustine’s. The new parish meets in the former St. Paul church and has a new rector, the Rev. Paul Wheatley. Because all of the parishes wanted to merge, the congregation has deeper roots than a new church that may have popped up a year ago, he said.“St. Paul’s, Epiphany and St. George’s all experienced demographic shifts in their neighborhoods over the last few decades and the congregations declined as the neighborhoods around them changed,” Wheatley said. “Our opportunity is reaching out and connecting them to the wonderful resources we have such as history, maturity and diversity.”The merge created a 90-member congregation that represents the neighborhoods surrounding the church, which is diverse in age and race, and thereby attracts new members. “They show up and we have great-grandparents, grandparents, Latinos, Anglos and African Americans,” Wheatley said. “Our local churches are at their best when they represent the diversity of the neighborhoods around them.”Diversity is not only a growing theme in Oak Cliff but in other areas of the diocese where services are held in a variety of languages. Congregations include Latin American, Nigerian, Kenyan, Bhutanese, and Korean.“On any given Sunday we have services in seven languages,” Heard said. Currently I’m looking for a priest who speaks Swahili.”One such service at Emmanuel Anglican Church is in the Igbo language, one of the three major languages of Nigeria. The mission meets at St. Luke’s in Dallas and has an average of 115 worshipers on Sunday, said the Rev. Daniel Ofoegbu.The mission competes with evangelical churches for newly transplanted Nigerians. “One of the challenges is that in Africa, the Episcopal Church is known as the Anglican Church, so it does not translate for them when they come to America and they end up at an evangelical church,” Ofoegbu said.Services in Spanish are also increasing in the diocese due to Dallas’ growing Hispanic population. About 90 percent come from the Roman Catholic Church and the other 10 percent come from an evangelical church, said the Rev. Tony Munoz.The main draw for Hispanics to the Episcopal Church is the liturgy, he said. “They like that we are a welcoming church, it makes them feel like they are home. They have more accessible priests, and they get excited when they find the sacrament is still here,” Munoz said. “They came from the Catholic Church where they felt like spectators, but here they get to be part of the liturgy and participate.”While Spanish-language services are a draw for Hispanics, engaging the second generation is much more difficult. “The people we reach are the parents who speak Spanish. We are trying to reach the children who speak English,” Munoz said. “Our challenge is to give them an English service with a Latino flavor.”Another stream of diocesan growth is a counterculture trend of Protestants coming into the Anglican faith, said the Rev. Joseph Hermerding, an assistant rector at Incarnation.“This movement is referred to as the Canterbury Trail. We are seeing young evangelicals looking for something more stable, more traditional, more relevant and transcendent than what they are used to,” Hermerding said. “They don’t want their pastor in jeans, sandals and a t-shirt.”Much of the attraction for the new converts is a rich, worship culture that is intellectual and takes the life of the mind very seriously, Hermerding noted.Part of the appeal is that the church is authentic and doesn’t pander for membership, he added.“We thought we would get all the yuppies from Uptown coming to our traditional service,” Hermerding said. “We get some of those, but we were surprised to also get those with tattoos and dreadlocks to high mass. We are not marketing to them. We are not trying to please them. We are trying to worship God and they are attracted to an articulate, thoughtful Christian orthodox message.”The Canterbury Trail is led by the millennial generation but is becoming a much broader movement, said the Rev. Steven Peay, associate dean at Nashotah House Theological Seminary. “It’s the new monasticism. They are looking for intentional community, they want depth, and they want something that makes a difference. People are not interested in the shallow spirituality that we’ve shoved out for years and years. They are looking to go deep.”Wheatley agreed that the Episcopal Church’s historical identity and doctrine is a strong catalyst for diocese growth and stability.“One of the strengths we have as a diocese is that Anglicanism has Catholic and Evangelical streams in it,” he said. “We have a faith that is old as the apostles and we serve a risen Lord whose Holy Spirit is always bringing renewal and life.”— Kimberly Durnan is communications director for the Diocese of Dallas.  Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab By Kimberly DurnanPosted Oct 2, 2014 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC October 3, 2014 at 8:34 pm Well done! Well documented, well organized and well illustrated. Thank you for holding up the faithful, sustained work by those in parishes of your diocese and, by extension, in the larger body of Christ’s church. We all need the hope and vision that come from sharing the ways others have overcome challenges. Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments (2) Rector Pittsburgh, PA Janet Campbell says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing October 8, 2014 at 7:48 pm A wonderful article, but “sit in the pews” suggests a passive, receiving audience, rather than a dynamic people who carry out the ministries in this article. Our liturgy is full of activity. When Episcopalians come together for worship, we gather, process, stand, sing, sit, proclaim, listen, baptize, anoint, pray, kneel, confess, share the peace, make offerings, give thanks, process to the table, eat and drink, feed one another, and are sent out to go into all the world. 11,300 people gather in their church buildings to celebrate, not “sit in the pews.” In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Don Plummer says: On our way rejoicing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York last_img read more

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Consultation centralizes liturgical life

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Consultation centralizes liturgical life Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY [Anglican Journal] The International Anglican Liturgical Consultation (IALC), a network of the Anglican Communion, has issued a communiqué summarizing its 2015 biennial meeting, held in Montreal, Aug. 3–8.The network, which met in Dublin in 2013, reaffirmed its commitment to strengthening the spiritual exchange between the churches of the Anglican Communion “by renewing its life of liturgy and prayer as integral to the mission of the Church.”Among the IALC summary’s many observations is the distinct move in several Communion provinces toward revising prayer books, hymnals and liturgical texts—a task often hampered by inadequate human and financial resources.The document also points to emerging concerns about the inadequacy of contemporary liturgical formation for clergy and lay leaders, with training in this aspect of worship no longer seen as a priority in seminaries and ministry training programs.Adopting revised guidelines for governance, IALC rearticulated its purpose. It stressed its central roles of advising Communion provinces on questions of liturgy and common prayer, and encouraging inter-province conversations on liturgical theology and practice. It also committed to reviewing developments in liturgical formation and practice with the Anglican Communion’s ecumenical partners and to aiding Anglican provinces making new proposals in these areas.Continuing the healing and reconciliation theme of the Dublin meeting, the Montreal gathering concluded that the journey toward reconciliation should include “ritual moments and symbolic enactments.“ To that end, the consultation committed to producing appropriate guidelines for these by exploring relevant biblical texts, the theology of reconciliation and baptismal identity, and liturgical frameworks for rites of corporate reconciliation. In this area, the group expects to work in partnership with the Archbishop of Canterbury’s Consultation on Peace and Conflict Prevention.Attendees included Anglican and Episcopal church representatives from Southern Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Melanesia, Polynesia, Korea, Hong Kong, Japan, the Philippines, Southern Africa, South America, Canada, the United States, England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales. The Anglican Communion office was represented by its director of unity, faith and order, Canon John Gibaut of the diocese of Ottawa. Anglican Church of Canada attendess included the primate, Archbishop Fred Hiltz; National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonald; and the Rev. Eileen Scully, director of faith, worship and ministry. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Liturgy & Music center_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Anglican Communion, Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA By Diana SwiftPosted Aug 18, 2015 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

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El Consejo Ejecutivo respalda al Ministerio Episcopal de Migración en…

first_img Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Refugee Ban, Tags In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Executive Council, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Advocacy Peace & Justice, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Refugees Migration & Resettlement Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Donald Trump, Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Feb 8, 2017 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group La Iglesia Episcopal se implicó formalmente por primera vez en la labor de reasentamiento de refugiados en los años 30 del pasado siglo, reubicando a personas que huían de la Europa nazi. El Fondo del Obispo Primado para Ayuda Mundial, predecesor de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo, surgió de este movimiento. Un cartel, que data de 1938, usa una imagen icónica que alude al pasaje de Mateo 2:13-16 que describe la huida de la Sagrada Familia a Egipto para escapar del rey Herodes. Foto del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración.[Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] El Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal reiteró el 8 de febrero la solidaridad de la iglesia con los refugiados en respuesta al decreto del presidente Trump por el que suspendía la entrada de estos en Estados Unidos.El 6 de febrero, jun juez federal bloqueó temporalmente la decisión de Trump, dejando el programa de admisión de refugiados del Departamento de Estado en el limbo.El enfoque del Consejo fue dual: económico y legal. Concedió $500.000 al Ministerio Episcopal de Migración (EMM por su sigla en inglés) para salvarlo económicamente durante la suspensión del reasentamiento de refugiados impuesta por Trump y mientras esa labor presuntamente se reanude, si bien en una escala más pequeña. También pidió que el Obispo Primado investigue si resulta “adecuado y aconsejable” defender en los tribunales el ministerio de reasentamiento de refugiados del EMM y la posición de la Iglesia respecto a que se indague la filiación religiosa [de los que ingresan al país].El obispo primado Michael Curry, que dijo previamente ese día que los episcopales deben afincar su labor de promoción pública en los valores de Jesús, dijo en una conferencia de prensa, después de terminada la reunión, que las acciones del EMM del Consejo eran un perfecto ejemplo de ese arraigo. Los cristianos creen en la admonición que se encuentra en la carta a los Hebreos de que al practicar la hospitalidad… algunos sin saberlo hospedaron ángeles.“Tenemos que estar allí y permanecer en esa labor”, afirmó él. “La parte decisiva no consiste en hacer la plática, sino en llevarla a la práctica”.Curry dijo que el Consejo “tenía el valor” de respaldar su ministerio para los refugiados, de casi 80 años de existencia, de una manera nueva e incluso más difícil que costará mucho más dinero de lo que esperábamos. Cuando la Iglesia Episcopal aboga a favor de los refugiados con los legisladores, recalcó él, “podemos decir que no estamos pidiendo algo que nosotros mismos no estemos haciendo”.El decreto presidencial, que aún se sigue litigando en los tribunales, suspende todo reasentamiento de refugiados durante al menos 120 días. Cuando el programa comience de nuevo impone restricciones adicionales a refugiados potenciales de siete países de mayoría musulmana. Además, después de la reanudación, Trump dijo que sólo 50.000 refugiados pueden entrar en Estados Unidos, en lugar de los 110.000 que se esperaba [que ingresaran] en este año fiscal.El EMM necesita el apoyo económico de la Iglesia denominacional porque la mayoría de sus ingresos proviene de contratos con el gobierno federal para cubrir costos de reasentamiento de refugiados a los que han admitido en Estados Unidos. El contrato federal vincula directamente ese dinero a la llegada de refugiados. Por consiguiente, si los refugiados no pueden entrar en EE.UU., el EMM no recibirá dinero.En el año fiscal 2016, del 1 de octubre de 2015 al 30 de septiembre de 2016, el EMM reasentó 5.762 refugiados en Estados Unidos provenientes de 35 países, entre ellos la República Democrática del Congo, Birmania, Afganistán y Siria. Ya en este año fiscal, el EMM ha recibido a 2.400 refugiados y esperaba reasentar a 6.175 personas hasta que Trump firmó su decreto el 27 de enero. El día 26, según dijo el Rdo. E. Mark Stevenson, director del EMM, este ministerio había recibido a 42 refugiados y ha reasentado a cerca de 70 mientras el decreto se debate en los tribunales.En lo estructural y en lo fiscal, el EMM es un ministerio singular de la Iglesia Episcopal. Si bien no está constituido como una entidad separada, tal como la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo, recibe muy poco dinero del presupuesto denominacional.El EMM esperaba $14,2 millones del Departamento de Estado de EE.UU. y $6,2 millones del Departamento [federal] de Salud y Servicios Humanitarios. El dinero del Departamento de Estado cubre la fase de llegada y ubicación de cada refugiado durante los primeros 90 días en este país. El dinero del Departamento de SSH sufraga una asignación complementaria que proporciona servicios a algunos refugiados, pero no a todos, durante 180 días. Esos servicios incluyen clases de inglés como segundo idioma, capacitación laboral y orientación cultural.Alguna financiación para la oficina nacional del EMM está garantizada hasta el 31 de marzo, dijo Stevenson, pero la financiación para los [candidatos a refugiados] se interrumpe en lo que dura la suspensión.Stevenson dijo que el 99,5 por ciento del dinero de los contratos se destina directamente al reasentamiento de refugiados, El EMM retiene unos $2 millones para gastos administrativos, incluidos los salarios del personal.  Cualquier dinero que no se utilice se le devuelve al gobierno.“Esta no es una empresa para hacer dinero”, dijo  Stevenson a Episcopal News Service.La preocupación se extiende más allá de la labor del EMM con sede en el Centro Denominacional de la Iglesia. El organismo colabora con su red de 31 [agencias] afiliadas locales en 23 estados, junto con 27 diócesis, además de comunidades religiosas y voluntarios, para reasentar refugiados. Esas organizaciones reciben dinero a través del EMM del contrato federal y no tendrán ningún ingreso cuando no entren refugiados en el país. Las [organizaciones] afiliadas tendrán que depender de reservas de dinero, recaudaciones de fondos y cualquier otro apoyo que el EMM pueda darles para pagar a sus empleados, pagar sus alquileres y cubrir otros gastos de funcionamientos.Stevenson le dijo al Consejo que el EMM debe ser capaz de sostener su ministerio durante la suspensión y relanzar una fase del programa de reasentamiento del gobierno. Para hacer eso, la Iglesia debe apoyar económicamente a la oficina nacional del EMM y encontrar medios de ayudar a sostener a sus afiliadas durante la suspensión, de manera que estén listas para reanudar el reasentamiento de refugiaos en lo que él predijo que sería un recomienzo lento.Las necesidades de los refugiados recién llegados incluyen vivienda, atención sanitaria y preparación sobre la vida en Estados Unidos. Si las afiliadas locales no están preparadas para hacer frente a estas necesidades, los refugiados entrarán en el país, pero serán reasentados en pobreza y vulnerabilidad, pese a ser distintas  de las que se han escapado, afirmó.“Lo que emprendemos es una labor evangélica”, dijo Stevenson, citando la insistencia tanto del Antiguo como del Nuevo Testamento de “tratar al extranjero como a nuestro prójimo”.Además de la financiación puente de $500.000 este año, el Consejo dejó abierta la puerta para darle dinero adicional al EMM en 2018, si lo necesitara. El ministerio debe presentar un “plan definido de sostenibilidad” para usar el dinero.En el contexto legal, el Consejo pidió que Curry investigara si es “aconsejable y apropiado presentar un litigio —o intervenir en él—con vistas a defender el ministerio de reasentamiento de refugiados del EMM” según la resolución al respecto que se aprobó.Además, al Obispo Primado se le pidió que hiciera la misma exploración “para recurrir la imposición de cualquier indagación de carácter religioso a refugiados, solicitantes de asilo o cualquier otra persona que buscara residencia, asilo o ingreso legal en Estados Unidos” La resolución dice que “tales indagaciones son contrarias a nuestra fe y contrarias a una interpretación en buena fe de la Constitución y estatuto del gobierno federal de EE.UU.”El consejo encomendó al Obispo Primado que consultara con la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, el encargado de asuntos jurídicos de la Iglesia, el Comité Ejecutivo del Consejo Ejecutivo, al director del EMM y a la Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales cuando contemple tomar cualquiera de esas decisiones. También pidió que  el encargado de asuntos jurídicos informe confidencialmente en la próxima reunión regular, del progreso de esa investigación y de cualquier litigio que pudiera resultar. Los miembros dejaron la puerta abierta para reunirse por vía electrónica si fuere necesario.(El Comité de Gobierno y Administración para el Ministerio [del Consejo] terminó de redactar la descripción de funciones del cargo de Encargado de Asuntos Jurídicos durante la reunión y el proceso de solicitud se encuentra ahora abierto. La última reunión de la Convención General creó el cargo, haciéndolo un puesto de obligación canónica).El Rdo. E. Mark Stevenson, director del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, sostiene un cartel con una lista de mandatos bíblicos a acoger al extranjero. Foto del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, vía Facebook.En una de las muchas sesiones de comités y del pleno a puertas cerradas que tuvieron lugar durante la reunión, los miembros del Consejo se reunieron en privado para interrogar a los miembros del comité de Gobierno y Administración para el Ministerio que propuso la resolución. Después de esa discusión y del subsiguiente debate y enmiendas, el Consejo aprobó la resolución con 14 votos a favor y 9 en contra.El consejo también dijo que quería expresar “su firme apoyo” a la Diócesis de Olympia y al obispo Greg Rickel por su ministerio con los refugiados. La diócesis, que tiene una agencia de reasentamiento, recientemente se sumó a la Unión Americana de Libertades Civiles en su oposición al decreto de Trump. El ‘escrutinio riguroso’ ya existeEl EMM es una de las nueva agencias de reasentamiento de EE.UU. que lleva a cabo su labor con un contrato del gobierno. Conforme a la ley federal, los refugiados sólo pueden entrar en EE.UU. bajo los auspicios de una de esas agencias.El término “refugiado” tienen un significado legal específico. El Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados designa a una persona como “refugiada” si huye de la persecución, la guerra o la violencia. Esas personas solicitan esa designación y se consideran distintas de los inmigrantes. Adquieren su carácter de refugiados después que la UNHCR aprueba su solicitud.La agencia de la ONU remite luego al refugiado a un país específico. Si ese país es Estados Unidos, comienza un subsecuente proceso de escrutinio. Ese segundo proceso es “muy riguroso, uno incluso podría decir que extremo”, dijo Stevenson a ENS. A los refugiados sirios se les aplicó un escrutinio adicional, dijo él.El Departamento de Estado de EE.UU. trabaja entonces con las nueve agencias y decide cuál de ellas reasentará a esa persona. Lleva unos cuantos meses completar el papeleo de manera que la persona pueda entrar en el país.Todo el proceso de escrutinio, dijo Stevenson, lleva de entre 18 y 24 meses.La reunión del 5 al 8 de febrero tuvo lugar en el Centro de Conferencias del Instituto Marítimo.Información adicional de ENS sobre la reunión se encuentra aquí. Algunos miembros del Consejo enviaron mensajes por Twitter valiéndose del hashtag #ExCoun.El Consejo Ejecutivo lleva a cabo los programas y políticas adoptadas por la Convención General, según el Canon I.4 (1). El Consejo está compuesto de 38 miembros, 20 de los cuales (cuatro obispos, cuatro presbíteros o diáconos y 12 laicos) son elegidos por la Convención General, y 18 por los nueve sínodos provinciales (un clérigo y un laico cada uno) por períodos de seis años, además del Obispo Primado y el Presidente de la Cámara de Diputados [que son miembros ex oficio]. Además, el vicepresidente de la Cámara de Diputados, el Secretario, el Director de Operaciones, el Tesorero y Director de Finanzas tienen asiento y voz, pero no voto.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 El Consejo Ejecutivo respalda al Ministerio Episcopal de Migración en medio del decreto de Trump El empeño por frenar el reasentamiento de refugiados traba el presupuesto del ministerio que los atiende Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Executive Council February 2017, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

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Diócesis de California auspicia una conversación de ecojusticia

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls Por Lynette WilsonPosted May 25, 2017 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Diócesis de California auspicia una conversación de ecojusticia El Obispo Primado asiste a la cuarta ecoconfirmación y predica en ella Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID El obispo de California Marc Andrus, el obispo primado Michael Curry y la Rda. Stephanie Spellers (a la extrema derecha), canóniga del Obispo Primado para la evangelización, la reconciliación y el cuidado de la creación, posan con los confirmandos durante un oficio de ecoconfirmación en el Presidio de San Francisco el 20 de mayo. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.[Episcopal News Service – San Francisco, California] “La obra de salvar la creación de Dios no es nada menos que la obra de Dios”. El obispo primado Michael Curry pronunció estas palabras durante un sermón el 19 de mayo aquí en la catedral de La Gracia [Grace Cathedral] en que enmarcaba el cuidado de la creación en el ámbito del Movimiento de Jesús.“Este es el mundo de Dios”, dijo él, alentando a los presente a afirmarse y a animarse unos a otros en el cuidado de la creación de Dios.“Estoy convencido de que Dios vino [a vivir] entre nosotros en Jesús para mostrarnos el camino no sólo de llegar a ser la familia humana, sino la familia de Dios. Y es por eso que estamos aquí porque el medioambiente, no, la creación, es parte de la familia de Dios. La familia de Dios es todo el mundo y el universo creados”.La Iglesia Episcopal ha visto desarrollarse las ideas del Obispo Primado sobre el Movimiento de Jesús en su dinámica predicación y en sus expresiones desde que él asumiera el cargo en noviembre de 2015. Su sermón del 19 de mayo situó el cuidado de la creación y la justicia medioambiental de lleno en ese contexto.El obispo primado Michael Curry predicó el 19 de mayo en la eucaristía de ecojusticia en la catedral de La Gracia, en San Francisco. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.El Obispo Primado le predicó a una congregación interreligiosa que abarrotaba la catedral como parte de un diálogo más amplio de ecojusticia sobre la salvaguarda del clima, el alimento y el agua auspiciado por la Diócesis de California del 18 al 20 de mayo. El 18 de mayo, la catedral celebró una conferencia en beneficio del Centro para la Agricultura ‘San Bernabé’ un colegio universitario episcopal del norte de Haití, y dos grupos medioambientales del área de la Bahía de San Francisco. El 19 de mayo una mesa redonda exploraba los efectos del cambio climático en la agricultura y en la seguridad alimentaria. Finalmente, en la mañana del 20 de mayo, Curry presidió el oficio de ecoconfirmación.La conversación tuvo lugar en un momento en que el gobierno de Trump procura destripar las regulaciones medioambientales destinas a reducir las emisiones de gas de efecto invernadero y a proteger la atmósfera y los recursos hidráulicos. El gobierno también está revisando las tierras públicas y los monumentos nacionales, contemplando el abrirlos a las perforaciones de petróleo y de gas, y ha prometido revivir la minería carbonífera.La 78ª. Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal priorizó la evangelización, la reconciliación y el cuidado de la creación; para abordar esta última creó un Consejo Asesor para el Cuidado de la Mayordomía de la Creación y autorizó la creación de materiales litúrgicos para honrar a Dios en la creación.La conversación sobre ecojusticia busca comprometer aún más a los episcopales con los problemas ambientales, entre ellos el agua y la seguridad alimentaria y la justicia medioambiental, en particular después de la solidaridad que mostrara la Iglesia Episcopal con la nación sioux de Roca Enhiesta [Standing Rock] en su oposición a que el Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas atravesara sus tierras tribales  debajo del río Misurí a la altura del lago Oahe,  que surte de agua a la reserva indígena de Roca Enhiesta y a otras río abajo. Las naciones indígenas de Estados Unidos y del mundo entero se unieron en una muestra de solidaridad sin precedentes con los sioux de Roca Enhiesta, y junto con activistas del clima, ambientalistas y otros individuos, entre ellos muchos episcopales, en su oposición al oleoducto. Se han detectado salideros a lo largo de un ramal y en el oleoducto principal, el cual está programado que empiece a operar a plena capacidad el 1 de junio.La Iglesia Episcopal, a través de su Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales con sede en Washington, D.C., y la Red Episcopal de Política Pública, tomando como guía las normativas de la Iglesia, aboga por el cuidado de la creación tanto en el ámbito local como en el nacional e internacional.El obispo de California Marc Andrus moderó una mesa redonda sobre ecojusticia en la catedral de La Gracia el 19 de mayo. Los panelistas fueron, de izquierda a derecha, Nicolette Hahn Niman, escritora y ganadera; Aaron Grizzell, director ejecutivo de la Fundación Comunitaria Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. del Norte de California; la Rda. Elizabeth DeRuff, fundadora de Honoré Farm and Mill en el Condado de Marín, California; Jayce Hafner, analista de política nacional de la Iglesia Episcopal y Grace Aheron, activista y miembro de la junta directiva de Cultiva: el Movimiento Alimentario Episcopal. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.“La política y la fe, no parecen [tener] una correlación natural al principio. Encuentro que, mientras trabajo con miembros de la Iglesia Episcopal y visito diferentes diócesis y parroquias, me cuestionan muchísimo, personas que dirán ‘tenemos estos increíbles ministerios en nuestra iglesia [nuestro edificio| es energéticamente eficiente… por qué debemos abogar más allá de eso, por qué debemos politizarnos’”, dijo Jayce Hafner, analista de la política nacional de la Iglesia durante la mesa redonda del 19 de mayo.“Yo diría que hay una diferencia entre politizarse y [participar] en la promoción de políticas. La promoción de políticas nos permite cerrar el círculo entre la impactante labor programática que estamos realizando para cerciorarnos de que llega a los salones del poder. Porque cuando uno contempla la injusticia en nuestro país, especialmente en el terreno medioambiental, la política es una herramienta increíble para promover la injusticia sistemática o para propagar la justicia para nuestra gente y para nuestro planeta”.Curry lo enmarcó de esta manera en su sermón: la esperanza y la salvación de la humanidad descansan en una visión de un mundo de Dios que no es una pesadilla. Y llamó a los presentes en la catedral y en la Iglesia Episcopal a alabar a Dios no sólo en su culto, sino [también] salvaguardando el agua y el aire.“Esto que hacemos no es el buenismo secular, este es el Movimiento de Jesús… Jesús vino a mostrarnos cómo llegar a ser la familia de Dios y esa es nuestra esperanza y nuestra salvación”, dijo Curry. “Este es el Movimiento de Jesús y nosotros somos la rama episcopal del Movimiento de Jesús y nada en la Tierra puede detener ese movimiento”.La ecoconfirmación incluyó una “caminata cósmica”, una meditación sobre la historia de la creación a partir del Big Bang hace 14.000 millones de años y la formación de la atmósfera de la Tierra, pasando por el surgimiento del homo sapiens, la escritura de la Biblia y el nacimiento de Jesús hasta el descubrimiento del oro en California en 1848 y la conversión del petróleo en una importante industria del estado a principios del siglo XX, para culminar en 1969, cuando los humanos vieron por primera vez la Tierra desde el espacio. Alisa Rasera sirvió como caminante cósmica. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.Al día siguiente, unos 40 confirmandos ratificaron sus creencias cristianas como miembros plenos de la Iglesia Episcopal. Los confirmandos —muchos de ellos alumnos de la  escuela para varones de la Catedral [Cathedral School for Boys] se reunieron con otros episcopales entre los cedros, cipreses y eucaliptos del mirador de la Puerta de Oro del Presidio. Una densa niebla no dejaba ver el puente de la Puerta de Oro y las sirenas de niebla oíanse a lo lejos.Esta era la cuarta ecoconfirmación en la Diócesis de California, que se distingue de la confirmación tradicional por tres palabras que se agregan a la quinta y última pregunta del Pacto Bautismal: “¿Lucharás por la justicia y la paz entre todos los pueblos y respetarás la dignidad de la Tierra y de todo ser humano?”“Como el obispo [de California] Marc [Andrus] apuntaba, hay realmente un breve cambio en la liturgia del LOC [Libro de Oración Común], que enfatiza que estamos en comunión con toda la creación de Dios además de las cosas que normalmente prometemos”, dijo la Rda. Melanie Mullen, directora de reconciliación, justicia y cuidado de la creación de la Iglesia Episcopal, en una entrevista con ENS durante la ecoconfirmación.“En general, la obra del Movimiento de Jesús incluye el cuidado de la creación”, dijo ella. Al elaborar materiales litúrgicos para honrar a Dios en la creación “aprendemos a orar las palabras de toda la creación de Dios en lo que hacemos”.Ello ayuda, afirmó Mullen, a llevar el servicio afuera.Fue la primera confirmación al aire libre de Curry, y fue “maravillosa”, dijo él. “En el comienzo de la creación, es el espíritu de Dios el que anida sobre el caos y genera orden y creación… la confirmación consiste en convocar a ese mismo espíritu que generó la creación a que genere una nueva vida en los que son confirmados de manera que el Cristo resucitado renazca igual en nosotros. ¡Eso es asombroso!”.Caren Miles, asociada de la Diócesis de California para formación de la fe, toma un selfie luego de la ecoconfirmación. Foto de Wilson/ENS.El Presidio de San Francisco, una antigua fortaleza militar de EE.UU., es parte del Servicio de Parques Nacionales. El lugar, en el extremo norte de la península de San Francisco, fue escogido [para la ecoconfirmación] por la vista (en un día claro) del puente de La Puerta de Oro y el océano Pacífico. Se escogió también porque es “un ejemplo del hombre labrando en la naturaleza en preparación de una guerra que nunca se produjo, y luego la naturaleza reclamando la tierra”, dijo Caren Miles, asociada de la diócesis para la formación de la fe, que planificó el oficio.La Diócesis de California y Andrus hace tiempo que participan en lo relativo al cambio climático y a la defensa de la justicia ambiental. Andrus ha representado al Obispo Primado en las negociaciones de Naciones Unidas sobre el clima, tanto en París como en Marrakech, Marruecos, y en la firma del Acuerdo de París.Gordon y Trillian Gilmore, miembros de la iglesia de San Miguel y Todos los Ángeles/el Espíritu Santo, en Concord, California,  comparten un momento de asombro: Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.Durante el oficio de ecoconfirmación, el obispo de California Marc Andrus le pidió a los presentes que meditaran en el asombro y en el mundo natural.“El asombro puede llevarnos a una relación más profunda con la naturaleza, es un don de Dios desde el comienzo del universo para ayudarnos a relacionarnos los unos con los otros, con el mundo y con Dios”, dijo Andrus, antes de invitar a la congregación  a que meditara en un momento de asombro, lo que experimentaban y cómo ese momento los cambiaba.Para Gordon Gilmore, su momento de asombro se produjo cuando vino a California por primera vez. Conducía por la Autopista 37 y vio el sol poniéndose en las marismas [cubiertas] de salicornias. La carretera hace una media luna a lo largo de la costa norte de la bahía de San Pablo al norte de San Francisco y atraviesa un refugio nacional de la vida salvaje creado hace más de 40 años parar proteger a las aves migratorias y al hábitat de los pantanos.La esposa de Gilmore, Trillian, también escogió el ocaso como su momento de asombro. Para ella fue mientras conducía hacia el oeste a través de la Sierra Nevada y observaba la puesta del sol múltiples veces durante 45 minutos mientras bordeaba los picos de las montañas”, contó.“Era hermoso”, dijo.-Lynette Wilson es jefa de redacción de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA center_img Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Environment & Climate Change Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT last_img read more

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Diocese of Atlanta clergy, laity renew vows at Martin Luther…

first_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Peggy Powell Dobbins says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL March 29, 2018 at 11:08 pm I wish I had been there. Thanks for writing this up. Diocese of Atlanta clergy, laity renew vows at Martin Luther King Jr.’s church Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Tags The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Advocacy Peace & Justice Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments (1) By Don PlummerPosted Mar 29, 2018 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Diocese of Atlanta Bishop Robert C. Wright speaks to clergy and laity at a renewal of vows services held at the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta. Photo: Diocese of Atlanta[Diocese of Atlanta] Clergy and laity of the Diocese of Atlanta gathered this week for their renewal of vows in the sanctuary of the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and his father and grandfather preached.Diocese of Atlanta Bishop Robert C. Wright, whose diocese also includes middle and north Georgia, said he sought permission to use the site because of its connection to the civil rights movement leader and the recognition of the humanity of all Americans.“Being that we are all Georgians now, and that Martin’s and Coretta’s earthly remains are laying just outside, it seems good to stop here and remember, and maybe even borrow some of their resolve for service,” Wright said, motioning toward the site outside the church where King and his wife are buried. “More than that, I invited you here because there are three important ideas that are easy to illustrate in this space. They are simple but eternal ideas. They are possibility, pain and power.”Wright said the small sanctuary that launched King to the international stage is a powerful symbol of possibility.“The local parish is still the hope of the world. If that sounds like too much to say, look around. This is a totally average parish. Still, from this place, a soul was equipped to confront pharaohs, mobilize people and call a nation to its better self,” Wright said.Since his ordination in 2012, Wright has focused renewal services on the diocese’s relationship with other denominations and religions and its mission to the world. Services have been held in a homeless shelter, a Jewish synagogue and at a parish church where a Muslim preached. When held at the diocese’s Cathedral of St. Philip, the services have featured a choir from a women’s prison, preachers from other denominations and, once, a foot washing.Ebenezer Baptist Church is the church in Atlanta where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and his father and grandfather preached. Photo: Diocese of AtlantaEbenezer Baptist Church, a national historic site not normally used for services, was opened to the diocese by Ebenezer Baptist’s current pastor, the Rev. Raphael G. Warnock, Wright’s friend and fellow advocate for social justice.Wright called for clergy and laity to actively seek new possibilities for sharing Jesus’ message in the world.“When we renew our vows today perhaps what needs renewing is not our intention to be faithful to our respective vows. Perhaps what needs renewing is our sense of possibility,” Wright said. “Maybe what is needed is for us to grasp again a God-sized sense of what is possible.”Standing behind King’s pulpit, adjacent to the organ where King’s mother was shot and killed, Wright said holding the service at Ebenezer highlighted current faith issues, such as gun violence.“What I want to point out here is, this place knows pain. It’s in the walls and the wood,” he said. “And if you’ll acknowledge that, then maybe in the spirit of fellowship, you could acknowledge your own pain in this place. Or at least pledge to.“Why? Because to renew our vows without acknowledging pain, sorrow and profound disappointment as we endeavor to be faithful is nothing more than putting lipstick on a pig.”Wright urged those at the service to breathe in the sanctuary’s history for their spiritual renewal.“If anything gets renewed today, let it be our ability to stay curious even in our pain, recognizing that God uses everything for learning and for the benefit of the world,” he said. “If anything gets renewed today, let it be our courage to be foolish for a God who makes life out of death, light out of darkness, and turns the cowering into conquerors.”— Don Plummer is director of media and community relations for the Diocese of Atlanta. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VAlast_img read more

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