Omega Systems to support Luckbox launch

first_imgSports betting CPO says there’s ‘more to come’ after latest product development deal AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Omega Systems to support Luckbox launch Email Address Omega Systems has won the race to provide the core of Luckbox’s esports betting service platform ahead of its full launch early next year.The agreement represents the latest major product development milestone for Luckbox, with further such announcements in the pipeline, according to the company’s chief product officer, Boris Mihov (pictured). Luckbox selected Omega ahead of a shortlist of more than a dozen rivals.“The announcement of a platform provider is the latest significant step in the project – and there’s more news to come related to key technology partners across the business. This includes sportsbook, casino content, UI/UX and a rewards system,” Mihov told iGamingBusiness.com.“From a development point of view, we are working on bringing esports specific functionality to the platform, followed by a full-on betting functionality launch.”Omega Systems will handle player account management and the integration process with the esportsbook engine, casino game providers and payments providers.Luckbox co-founder and CEO Lars Lien said: “Our team met with more than a dozen potential platform providers and Omega was the stand-out choice.“As we have said from day one, player security and regulatory compliance – doing things right – are our core values at Luckbox and Omega’s strength in these aspects was a strong influence on the decision-making process.“Their service offers gambling-grade technology which is fully compliant with the highest regulatory requirements – offering players the best and safest experience.”Omega provides clients with their own gaming and e-commerce platform, allowing total control of their data, operations and player management, utilising any combination of more than 130 integrated third-party gaming providers.Luckbox chief operating officer Quentin Martin added: “Omega offers a cutting-edge tech stack, is fully featured, is completely compliant with all the regulatory requirements, particularly the responsible gaming features which is very important to us due to our values. It is absolutely the right fit.“We shopped around extensively for the right partner and Omega stood out head and shoulders above the rest.”Earlier this month, Luckbox set out plans to establish itself in a number of key markets around the world after becoming the first cryptocurrency-supported esports betting platform to obtain a top-tier gambling licence from the Isle of Man government. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Topics: Sports betting Tech & innovation 17th August 2018 | By contenteditorlast_img read more

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New Sky Bet chief says tech can stem problem gambling

first_img Email Address People AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Ian Proctor, the new chief executive of Sky Betting & Gaming, has admitted that operators now have a “moral responsibility” to crunch customer behaviour data to understand how problem gambling can develop.Proctor was confirmed as the new CEO earlier this month, replacing the long-serving Richard Flint, after a $4.7bn (£3.6bn/€4bn) takeover by The Stars Group was finally approved by the UK’s competitions regulator.Proctor acknowledged that the gambling sector “is not the flavour of the month” and suggested that, in parallel with increasing levels of regulatory scrutiny, there had been a shift in responsibility for player behaviour away from the individual and towards the operators.“Responsible gambling is important to me,” Proctor, who said that technology would play a vital role in identifying the signs of problem gambling, told the Yorkshire Evening Post.“It’s an emotive topic at the moment. We [the industry as a whole] have not done ourselves any favours. A few years ago, everybody who worked in the industry would have considered that it was up to the customer as an adult to make choices.“That was the mantra. The shift has been to an almost paternalistic model where there is a moral obligation to think about affordability.“This is not just about problem gambling. It goes further than that, because people can develop problems over time. We don’t want people to spend beyond their means.“Working in an online business, the access that we have to customers’ data can help us understand people’s spending patterns. We have got this rich information about customers and that’s the starting point for all of this.”Proctor suggested that players could be provided with a daily, weekly or monthly profit-and-loss account.The new CEO added that he hopes to add more recruits to the company’s base in Leeds, UK.“We’ve grown from 300 to 400 people five years ago to 1,500 people in Yorkshire,” he said. “It’s the place you would like your son or daughter to work. That’s the acid test. It cuts through all the rest of the noise.“The average age of the staff is around 32 years old. We’ve taken an average of 40 graduates a year each year over the last few years.“There’s a significant market share to be gained, there is still headroom left in the UK. There are new customers coming to the sector.”Image credit: Sky Betting & Gaming Newly-installed Sky Betting & Gaming CEO Proctor says operators must do more New Sky Bet chief says tech can stem problem gambling Tags: Online Gambling Regions: UK & Ireland Topics: People 22nd October 2018 | By contenteditor Subscribe to the iGaming newsletterlast_img read more

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bwin fined $81k over self-exclusion failings in New Jersey

first_imgFinance 21st March 2019 | By contenteditor Topics: Finance Legal & compliance Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter GVC Holdings-owned bwin.party has been fined $81,000 (£61,700/€71,100) for allowing self-excluded players to gamble via its online platform in New Jersey. bwin fined $81k over self-exclusion failings in New Jersey Tags: Online Gambling GVC Holdings-owned bwin.party has been fined $81,000 (£61,700/€71,100) for allowing self-excluded players to gamble via its online platform in New Jersey.The New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement (NJDGE) imposed the fine after filing a complaint against bwin in December, seeking a sanction for breaching state regulations.The Civil Action Order details that a total of $41,759.49 was lost by a number of self-excluded players on bwin’s platform. bwin operates in partnership with the Borgata Casino (pictured) in the state.New Jersey law states that players who have self-excluded from gambling should not be able to access any licensed platform until the agreed self-exclusion period is over. As a result, the NJDGE ruled that bwin was in breach of the Casino Control Act.The NJDGE has been seeking to clamp down on breaches in regulation in recent months and in January also issued a fine to Rush Street Interactive for allowing minors to access its igaming services.Rush Street was ordered to pay $30,000, becoming the first igaming operator to face a punishment for such regulation breaches in New Jersey.Earlier this month, New Jersey Assemblymember Ralph Caputo also put forward a new bill that would formalise the penalties imposed on licensees that offer odds on sporting events for which betting is prohibited, with the guilty parties facing fines and automatic licence suspensions.The bill aims to have licensed operators found to have taken bets on prohibited events refund all amounts wagered, as well as paying a fine of between $20,000 and $10,000. They will also have their sports betting licence suspended for a period of up to 10 days. Regions: US New Jersey AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Addresslast_img read more

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US and Australia drive PPB revenue growth in Q1

first_img Paddy Power Betfair has reported a 17% year-on-year increase in revenue for the first quarter of 2019, with strong growth in its US and Australian operations offsetting a decline in online sports betting revenue.Revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2019, rose to £478m (€557.0m/$624.6m). This comprised £366m in sports revenue, up 15% year-on-year, and revenue of £113m from gaming, a 26% increase.Growth was driven by the operator’s Australian and US businesses, which saw revenue rise 20% and 47% respectively.The Australian division, comprising the Sportsbet brand, saw revenue rise to £96m, driven by a 17% increase in customer stakes for the quarter. The business was hit by adverse racing results, though Paddy Power Betfair noted that while this meant net revenue margin fell below expectations, it was still 0.2 percentage points above Q1, 2018 at 9.2%.US revenue, meanwhile, came in at £78m, with a 12% growth in the operator’s non-sportsbook businesses supplemented by $24m in sports betting revenue. This has had a positive effect on the New Jersey-licensed Betfair Casino, which saw revenue jump 83% due to sportsbook cross-sell, helping the brand increase its market share in the state to 14%.Sports betting stakes for Q1 amounted to $598m, aided by FanDuel leading the New Jersey sports betting market over the period, generating 50% of market revenue. Further US growth is expected with FanDuel’s retail sportsbook going live in Boyd Gaming’s Valley Forge Casino Resort in Pennsylvania during March, and online wagering set to launch in the coming weeks.The online division accounted for the majority (£228m) of group revenue in Q1, with a strong performance from gaming offset by a decline in sports revenue. The division benefitted significantly from the acquisition of Georgian igaming operator Adjarabet in February this year, which contributed 5 percentage points to online growth in Q1. Excluding the impact of Adjarabet, revenue for the division would have been down 1% year-on-year.This, Paddy Power Betfair said, was due to a £6% decline in sports revenue to £152m, with 1% growth in exchange and B2B revenue offset by a 10% decline in sportsbook’s contribution. This was blamed on unfavourable horse racing results in February and football results in March, as well as the temporary suspension of UK horse racing fixtures in February as a result of an equine flu outbreak.Online gaming revenue, on the other hand, was up 31% to £76m. Excluding Adjarabet, revenue would have been up 14%, driven by strong growth in the Paddy Power brand.The operator said it remained focused on growing its recreational customer base and enhancing anti-money laundering procedures, as well as developing responsible gambling interventions. This, it said, was impacting revenue from higher value customers, particularly for the Betfair brnad.Retail was the only division to post an overall decline in revenue for the period, with 2% gaming machine growth offset by a 5% decrease in sports revenue. This saw retail revenue decline 2% year-on-year to £77m. While sportsbook stakes were up 4%, revenue was impacted by margin declining to 11.4%, as a result of adverse racing results in February.“Q1 was a good quarter for the Group with revenues up 17%, notwithstanding customer friendly sports results in the UK,” Paddy Power Betfair chief executive Peter Jackson said. “Underlying momentum remains good for Paddy Power with 22% growth in average daily actives.“For Betfair, we continue to make good progress on the technology development work to enhance our global customer propositions which will enable us to accelerate international growth,” Jackson continued. “Meanwhile, the geographical diversification of our online business has been further enhanced by the addition of Adjarabet in February, with integration progressing well.”Jackson added that trading in April was in line with company expectations, with FanDuel expected to generate good returns on its US sports betting investment.“[For] rest of the Group we remain on track to meet our full year profit expectations despite the adverse sports results in Q1,” he added. “We remain excited about the growth opportunities that lie ahead for the Group.” 2nd May 2019 | By contenteditor Regions: UK & Ireland US New Jersey Pennsylvania Topics: Casino & games Finance Sports betting Strategy Slots Paddy Power Betfair has reported a 17% year-on-year increase in revenue for the first quarter of 2019, with strong growth in its US and Australian operations offsetting a decline in online sports betting revenue. Tags: Mobile Online Gambling OTB and Betting Shops Slot Machines AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter US and Australia drive PPB revenue growth in Q1 Email Address Casino & gameslast_img read more

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Labour’s deputy leader sets out plans for gambling ombudsman

first_img Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Tags: Online Gambling Labour’s deputy leader sets out plans for gambling ombudsman Topics: Legal & compliance Tom Watson, deputy leader of the Labour Party, has revealed plans to establish a gambling ombudsman to oversee the national industry and renewed calls for igaming operators to reapply for their licences. Regions: UK & Ireland Legal & compliance 18th June 2019 | By contenteditor Tom Watson, deputy leader of the Labour Party, has revealed plans to establish a gambling ombudsman to oversee the national industry and renewed calls for igaming operators to reapply for their licences.Watson will today (June 18) set out the plans in a speech at the independent cross-party think tank Demos, focusing on how the ombudsman would be dedicated to consumer protection in the industry.Should the initiative be adopted, the ombudsman would have the power to adjudicate in disputes between operators and consumers, awarding players financial compensation where appropriate, The Guardian reports. Watson has also renewed calls for all operators licensed by the GB Gambling Commission since 2014 to reapply for approval to operate in the market. The review would be a slimmed down version of initial plans Watson set out last month when, in a letter to Culture Secretary and Gambling Commission, he called for all online gaming licensees to re-apply.Writing in Parliamentary magazine The House, Watson said that this would ensure that all licensees are capable of operating fairly and transparently. In particular he highlighted so-called white label operators, which are active in the UK under a service provider’s licence, and those with only minor UK operations that invest heavily in sports sponsorship, as companies that should be scrutinised. “If they fail to demonstrate corporate responsibility or adequate measures to prevent harm, these operators should face what I call the ultimate sanction: not just a fine, but the revocation of their licence,” he said.“I believe that a UK gambling licence should be a hallmark of credibility and trust. It should not be seen as a platform for overseas operators to use the reputation of British sport as a marketing tool for their own domestic audience, whereby the benefits of the UK market are enjoyed, but nothing is given back to address the harm that is caused.”He said that for too long, some elements of the industry had “acted beyond reasonable limits.“I want to see fairness in the market, consistency in legislation, and a reduction of harm,” Watson explained. “Instead I see the opposite. This is particularly true when it comes to online gambling.” Email Addresslast_img read more

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Decision time for turnaround king Camelot

first_img Topics: Lottery Tags: Online Gambling The UK National Lottery operator has seen digital sales surge since implementing its strategic review in 2017, but is also facing increased competition on a number of fronts as it weighs a bid for the new licence from 2023. By Joanne Christie Competitors to incumbent lottery operators have often described monopolies as lazy, outdated and lacking in innovation, particularly on the digital front. As recently as a few years ago, it would not have been completely unfair to describe UK National Lottery operator Camelot in such terms.Sales were falling, as were returns to good causes, as changes to games and price rises proved deeply unpopular with players.But Camelot has staged an impressive turnaround since its 2017 strategic review and the appointment of Nigel Railton as CEO the same year, particularly on the digital front.In its first-half results, released in November to coincide with the 25th anniversary of the National Lottery, it reported a whopping 40% rise in digital sales.“Digital has been one of our four focus areas following the strategic review we carried out a couple of years ago,” explains Neil Brocklehurst, commercial director at Camelot (pictured above).“Our continued focus on digital led to record half-year digital sales of £1.1bn, breaking the £1bn mark for the first time for the half-year.”Like many other areas of the igaming market, the bulk of Camelot’s digital sales are coming via mobile, with mobile sales rising to £749m for the half year, a 73.5% increase on the same period in 2018. Partly, this is down to improvements in its mobile offerings, says Brocklehurst. “We’ve improved all aspects of our iPhone and Android apps over the past couple of years, looking at everything from their stability and performance, through to the player experience. “This has included some functional, but really useful additions, like the introduction of touch ID and face recognition, as well as some fun new features, like a ‘number picker’.” He says sales via the apps are at an all-time high, with its iOS app now boasting a four-star rating on the App Store. Making headway with millennials Unsurprisingly, Brocklehurst says online players skew slightly towards a younger demographic. And while conventional wisdom is that it’s largely older people playing the lottery, the recently released NHS Health Survey revealed that just as many in the much-coveted millennial generation were playing.While the survey found that overall, 36% of respondents had played draw-based games in 2018, in the 25-34 category this figure was 32% and in the 35-44 category it was 43%.Brocklehurst says the annuity game Camelot released in early 2019 had resonated with younger players. “Set For Life appeals to younger people who can see how the top prize of £10,000 a month for 30 years would help them tick off their wish list of amazing life experiences. “We had a recent 19-year-old top prize winner, Sam Lawton, who was inspired to play Set For Life after watching the news about another winner, Dean Weymes, so he bought a ticket through the app.”He adds that instant win games that tie into popular culture, such as Friends and Love Island-themed games, are also popular with younger players.While pleased with the success of the National Lottery’s new products, Brocklehurst is also keen to point out that its changes to the main Lotto game are also paying off. “I’m also really thrilled that we’ve seen an increase in Lotto sales, making us one of the few lotteries globally to be growing the flagship lotto game.”And while Camelot is beefing up its digital offering, Brocklehurst is clear it remains equally focused on retail. Retail resurgence He says the 5% increase in in-store sales for the first half, while eclipsed by the digital growth, is encouraging in the context of the general downturn in retail sales.It’s a fair point given Office for National Statistics figures showed that in November UK retail sales fell by 0.6%. This was the fourth consecutive month with no growth, the first time this has occurred since the mid-1990s.  “Although sales through our digital channels are growing at a faster rate than retail, we are simultaneously growing both in-store and online sales despite the ongoing challenging high street conditions.”Part of Camelot’s success in this respect has come from expanding its distribution channels into budget retailers such as Aldi and Iceland. Going forward, Brocklehurst champions an omnichannel approach. “We don’t see retail and digital being mutually exclusive. The world of digital is merging with retail and we see a seamless omni-channel experience as the future. For example, we already provide retail players with the ability to check their ticket using their mobiles.”Other items on Camelot’s agenda for the future include plans to make EuroMillions “more exciting in early 2020”, as well as to develop marketing around its ‘Dream Big, Play Small’ strategy. This strategy is made up of various responsible gambling elements and is part of Camelot’s “wider corporate responsibility strategy, which centres on promoting healthy play”, says Brocklehurst. In line with this, in October the operator withdrew its £10 scratchcards from all retail outlets after discovering they over-indexed among problem gamblers. “We believed this was the right thing to do to help protect the very small minority of players concerned, less than 1% of all National Lottery players,” he says. In addition, in December Camelot announced it was the first UK lottery operator to achieve Advanced Level 2 of GamCare’s Safer Gambling Standard.“We’re ranked just 66th in the world in terms of per capita spend, despite being the sixth largest lottery in the world by sales, underlining the effectiveness of our strategy to encourage lots of people to play but to only spend relatively small amounts,” says Brocklehurst. Competition on multiple fronts However, Camelot faces intense competition for the lots of people it wants to attract, admits Brocklehurst.“The emergence in recent years of synthetic national lotteries, such as the Health Lottery and the People’s Postcode Lottery, and additional direct, and often aggressive, competition from the wider gambling sector, particularly bet-on-lottery firms, has seen the National Lottery and the vital money it raises for good causes come under increased pressure,” he says.Though in some cases Camelot has been successful in lobbying for changes to protect its monopoly, for example, with the government’s decision to ban lottery betting on EuroMillions, when it comes to society lotteries its argument seems not to be holding sway.Following a government consultation setting out plans to increase the prize limits for society lotteries in 2018, the Gambling Commission launched its own consultation into the proposal in December. Brocklehurst says such lotteries are at odds with the ‘single national lottery’ model set up by Parliament. “The emergence in recent years of synthetic national lotteries has placed this model, and returns to Good Causes, at risk. These operators don’t pay Lottery Duty on ticket sales, unlike the National Lottery which pays 12%, and are able to spend significantly more on marketing. Because of our licence structure, we are limited in the amount we can spend in this area. This means that our share of voice has reduced.”Camelot also faces an even greater threat from society lotteries, with Health Lottery owner Northern & Shell having stated publicly that it plans to bid for the fourth National Lottery licence when it comes up for tender in March.Camelot has held the licence to operate the National Lottery since it began in 1994, with its current term expiring in 2023. Competition in the tender is expected to be fierce, with Richard Branson’s Virgin Group and Czech-based Sazka Group also reportedly considering bids.Though declining to confirm for definite that Camelot will submit a bid given the final structure of the licence will not be published until March, Brocklehurst does say, however: “Having run one of the world’s most successful lotteries for the past 25 years, raising over £40bn for Good Causes in the process, it’s only natural we’re interested in bidding for the next National Lottery licence. We’ve been speaking with the Gambling Commission as part of the market engagement process it has been carrying out ahead of the fourth licence competition.“In the meantime, our immediate focus is on building on our sales growth over the last two-and-a-half years and continuing to maximise returns to Good Causes.” Email Address 20th January 2020 | By Stephen Carter Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Lottery Decision time for turnaround king Camelot The UK National Lottery operator has seen digital sales surge since implementing its strategic review in 2017, but is also facing increased competition on a number of fronts as it weighs a bid for the new licence from 2023. By Joanne Christie Regions: UK & Irelandlast_img read more

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Coljuegos sets out regulations for live dealer launch

first_img Tags: Mobile Online Gambling 18th May 2020 | By contenteditor Coljuegos sets out regulations for live dealer launch Casino & games Regions: LATAM Colombia Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Address Colombian gambling regulator Coljuegos has published regulations governing the launch of live dealer online casino games in the country, having approved the legalisation of the vertical in April.Having carried out an impact assessment of the launch, Coljuegos concluded that there was little crossover between land-based and online players, meaning the rollout would have little impact on brick-and-mortar casinos.The regulator first announced that licensees would soon be able to offer live dealer casino in April, days before it officially signed the decree into law.While there had been some opposition to the launch of live dealer from the land-based sector, the regulator argued that it would instead drive visitation to physical properties.Furthermore, land-based casinos will be permitted to stream games such as roulette and blackjack live from their gaming floors in partnership with online operators though in-venue customers will not be permitted to play alongside online gamblers. Venues that do not have any table games, such as gaming halls, will also be able to offer live dealer content via terminals.With the country’s lockdown, enforced as a result of novel coronavirus (Covid-19) extended, live dealer would drive revenue for Colombia’s igaming licensees, Coljuegos added. At a time when revenue has fallen due to the suspension of all major sporting competitions, this would ensure the sector was able to generate funding for the country’s public health system.Providers may broadcast games from foreign jurisdictions, provided their content meets technical specifications set by Coljuegos. Each title must be certified by a testing house, and ensure a return to player rate of 83% over each year.The regulations, which modify the legislation that facilitated the launch of igaming in 2016, come into force once they are published in the government’s Official Gazette. Colombian gambling regulator Coljuegos has published regulations governing the launch of live dealer online casino games in the country, having approved the legalisation of the vertical in April. Topics: Casino & games Table games AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterlast_img read more

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Spain lifts Covid-19 ad restrictions

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Casino & games Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Tags: Online Gambling Email Address Spain has repealed a series of temporary restrictions on gambling advertising during the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) crisis, as the country continues to ease .The latest Royal Decree, Royal Decree-Law 21/2020, published today (10 June) in the Official State Gazette (BOE), repeals article 37 of Royal Decree-Law 11/2020, which introduced strict advertising restrictions for gambling operators. Spain is preparing to lift the state of emergency declared on 13 March, which is due to expire on 21 June.Bonuses, discounts, free bets and bet multiplier offers were all prohibited, as were individual email communications and direct advertising on social media.In addition, operators were not allowed to refer explicitly or implicitly to the pandemic in their marketing.The decree also stated that gambling advertising could only be broadcast on TV and radio between the hours of 1am and 5am each day.While these restrictions are lifted for now, they are soon to be replaced by similar restrictions on gambling advertising. In February, the government announced a series of new measures for advertising as part of a consultation which ran until 16 March.The restrictions announced in February included a ban on audiovisual advertising outside of the hours of 1am to 5am, but did provide an exception for live sports broadcasts between 8pm and 5am. However, these ads must not make any reference to promotions or bonuses, mention live odds or contain direct inducements to gamble, such as “play now” or “bet now”.Under these new restrictions, operators would also not be able to use public figures to endorse their products. Marketing communications must also avoid overstating the chances of winning and avoid promoting gambling as a path to financial or social success.Acquisition bonuses, meanwhile, will be capped at €100. Email advertising may only be sent after checking whether the recipients are listed on Spain’s self-exclusion database or classed as an at-risk player, while social media ads must be aimed at an audience filtered to avoid minors, with a responsible gambling ad shown for every four standard ads. Regions: Europe Southern Europe Spain Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance Marketing & affiliates Sports betting Spain has repealed a series of temporary restrictions on gambling advertising during the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) crisis, as the country takes steps to return to normality. Spain lifts Covid-19 ad restrictions 10th June 2020 | By Daniel O’Boylelast_img read more

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US casinos continue to reopen as Covid-19 restrictions eased

first_img19th June 2020 | By contenteditor Casino & games Topics: Casino & games A number of leading commercial casino operators in the US have announced the reopening of their properties as states continue to relax restrictions for the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic. US casinos continue to reopen as Covid-19 restrictions eased A number of leading commercial casino operators in the US have announced the reopening of their properties as states continue to relax restrictions for the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic.Commercial and tribal casinos were forced to temporarily close in March due to the Covid-19 crisis, but the easing of measures in certain states mean properties are now being allowed to reopen, subject to certain restrictions.Caesars Entertainment Corporation resumed gambling operations at its Paris Las Vegas yesterday (June 18) in Las Vegas, Nevada.The operator had already reopened its Caesars Palace, Flamingo Las Vegas and Harrah’s Las Vegas properties in the city, as well as the gaming floor at The LINQ Hotel + Experience.Read the full story on iGB North America.center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Regions: US Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Addresslast_img read more

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GVC secures double CSR certification

first_img“These are two significant measures of our commitment to operating GVC to the highest standards of environmental, social and governance practices,” GVC chief executive Shay Segev said. CSR 16th October 2020 | By Robert Fletcher GVC secures double CSR certification “We are delighted with the progress that we have made in these areas and are committed to driving further improvements throughout our business.” GVC Holdings has revealed it was able to retain its position in the FTSE4Good Index Series, and also secured independent verification of its carbon emissions data from the Carbon Trust. Email Address This covered governance, including risk management, corporate governance and anti-corruption, as well as social practices encompassing human rights, labour standards and health and safety, and also environmental commitments such as energy usage and waste management. Last week, GVC also raised its earnings guidance for 2020 after reporting a 12% year-on-year rise in net gaming revenue for the third quarter of 2020. GVC said it now expects its full-year earnings are now expected to reach £50m. Tags: GVC CSR The verifications come after GVC this week became one of the first operators to secure a new sports betting licence from the Regional Council of Darmstadt in Germany. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Topics: Social responsibility CSR GVC kept its place in the index after an independent assessment, which looked at its practices and public documents against a series of criteria related to ESG. Gauselmann Group’s Cashpoint brand and Tipwin were also among the first recipients of the new licences. The FTSE4Good Index Series is a scheme designed to measure the performance of companies demonstrating strong environmental, social and governance (ESG) practices. Meanwhile, the Carbon Trust, a group focused on helping organisations reduce their carbon emission and implement resource efficiency strategies, verified GVC’s 2019 emissions data, after it presented a 10% reduction on the prior year. GVC said it will now seek to build on this verification by working with the Carbon Trust to also secure its Carbon Management Standard, which would demonstrate further progress against the operator’s objective of reducing its environmental impact. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletterlast_img read more

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