How I met my lender

first_img 35SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Michelle Oliphant Michelle Oliphant is a member of the marketing department at Accenture Mortgage Cadence, a position she has held since 2012. She focuses primarily on product marketing, helping to shape the … Web: www.accenture.com Details I bought a home just last month. I had a number of reasons to go down this road: Rental rates where I live are very high, and my family, friends, and job are here, so I was ready to put down roots and stay in one place for a while. I also wanted to make an investment.However, as a millennial, I feel like my generation is still misunderstood by most lenders. Whether it is because of the crushing volume of student loan debt, because of a general distrust of institutions after the financial crisis, or because we value mobility and technology seemingly above all else, it’s clear that there is a shift in the way we millennials think about our finances, housing, and lifestyles. This presents new challenges for lenders, forcing them to approach this group in a different way.Economists speculate every day about how to attract millennials to home buying. As the largest generation since the Baby Boomers, we represent a huge opportunity. Yet, while it’s clear that attracting millennials is crucial, what isn’t clear is how to go about it. The lessons gleaned from my own home buying experience – starting with how I met my lender – may provide valuable insight into the mindset of my generation. From initial advertising to the application process and follow-up, there were a number of key steps our lender took to attract – and ultimately retain – our business.The first step in buying a home was finding a lender. Going to a credit union first was a natural choice, as I’ve been a member of a credit union most of my life. For comparison purposes, I applied with more than one lender, submitting applications at my primary credit union, as well as two others in my community. In addition to being people-focused, I found that credit unions offer comprehensive home financing products and good rates. They are smaller and community-oriented.With all that said, however, credit unions remain the best kept secret of personal finance; with smaller advertising budgets and less publicity than larger lenders, they provide great service to their members, though don’t seem to aggressively seek new members.This brings me to the first lesson: advertising directly to millennials, via the appropriate digital channels, is crucial. While advertisements for the biggest names in banking are splashed all over the internet –especially via social media – it is rare to see any credit union advertising. This is a mistake. Without my existing membership at a credit union, which I’ve had since I was young, I would not have known to go there to apply for a mortgage. In addition to the credit union I belong to, I chose two others based on their presence in real estate finance. After narrowing down the lenders, I went to their websites to apply. A couple of them offered an easily accessible consumer application. Another simply offered a form, soliciting my contact information with the promise that a staff member would reach out soon.With short, digestible groups of questions, the online applications each took about 15 minutes to complete. They were easy to understand and easy to finish. In stark contrast, the lender offering the “contact us” form responded after 24 hours, when the loan officer sent over a clunky PDF of the 1003, the traditional, paper-based mortgage application. I was to print, fill out, scan, and it back via email. The form was confusing. It was daunting. And I needed a magnifying glass.This brings me to my second lesson: Offering an online mortgage application, one that is clear, simple, and educational, is not optional. The credit union offering the online application contacted me within a couple of hours. After setting up a time to talk, we discussed the process, what to expect, what monthly payment we were looking for, how escrow would work, and some first-time home buyer programs. I was at ease with this lender and felt completely confident in their ability to help me through the process.In contrast, the CU with the “contact us” form on their website called and then sent over a pre-qualification letter the next day. There was no guidance offered, no education, no feeling that they were there to help me. In fact, three months have passed and they still haven’t even followed up with me once.Prompt follow-up and step-by-step explanation of the process is the third key lesson to retain the millennial market. A few days of delay, with no further follow-up, is not acceptable in our fast-paced world. The lessons here are broad: when going after the millennial market, increase visibility via social media, and directly target the digital venues that millennials frequent.Making the mortgage application easy to use and straightforward via the internet is essential and a good first step; also consider investing in e-signature and document imaging technology to further improve the borrowing experience. Our technological world means that information is available within seconds. Millennials have grown up in this world and know how to navigate it. You must be responsive and faster than you think you need to be. Be friendly, and be an educator throughout the process.In the end, my mortgage processing, underwriting, and the eventual closing was just as easy as the application – but that’s a story for another day.last_img read more

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RVP set for United return

first_img “It’s been great working with Wayne because he’s an excellent footballer,” he said. “I’ve said from day one he’s been great. “He had a very good game in midweek. “We want that form to continue. We want him to keep scoring goals. “He is a big plus for us just now. “I don’t think it’s me or anyone else. It’s Wayne Rooney. He had to make sure he was the best he could be and he’s done that. “He’s in good nick, his talent is unquestionable. “He’s physically very good, mentally in a good place and his form has been good.” After losing three times already this season, and recording only one victory in their four Premier League home games, United have fallen off the pace and head into the weekend eight points adrift of pacesetters Arsenal. Stoke manager Mark Hughes on Thursday suggested his old club could not afford any further slip-ups and that there was an air of vulnerability about them that did not exist under Sir Alex Ferguson. Evidently, Moyes does not agree. “That might be Mark’s opinion,” said Moyes. “He’s entitled to that but we’ll wait and see. “There’s only two months of the season gone and there will be a lot of slip-ups by teams between now and the end of the season. “We don’t want to lose many more if we can help it.” Manager David Moyes has confirmed Robin van Persie should be fit to return for Manchester United when the Premier League champions entertain Stoke. Van Persie sat out Wednesday’s Champions League victory over Real Sociedad with a combination of niggling problems. But it appears the Dutchman’s absence will be a brief one. “Robin has a good chance,” said Moyes. “He had a problem with his toes and a little bit with his groin. “But he has had a little bit of training as well and he should be okay.” Moyes confirmed experienced defenders Nemanja Vidic and Rio Ferdinand were also progressing well. However, England duo Danny Welbeck and Tom Cleverley remained on the sidelines. “Danny has fluid on his knee,” the Scot said. “Tom is still recovering from his calf.” Moyes refused to comment on reports United were set to offer striker Wayne Rooney a contract extension. However, the Scot did admit Rooney was in top form at present. Press Associationlast_img read more

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Michigan made: With big goals, Eric Devendorf hits the ground running at Detroit Mercy

first_img Comments Published on January 21, 2019 at 10:52 pm Contact Matthew: [email protected] | @MatthewGut21 Facebook Twitter Google+center_img DETROIT — At 10:38 a.m. Friday, Jan. 4, sneakers screeched the hardwood floor inside Calihan Hall. The heating system and constant beating of basketballs provided the soundtrack for two bodies getting a little extra work, 13 hours after a conference win. Sweat dripped from Detroit Mercy forwards Chris Brandon and Boe Nguidjol as they listened to the voice that dominated the arena.They led drills of driving and finishing, while the man behind the voice peppered his players with passes and encouraged them to hold their follow-throughs on their shots. For more than a decade, 31-year-old former Syracuse star Eric Devendorf led similar drills — with a similar vigor — in the place he called “home.”Dating back to his time as a player at Syracuse, the Orange fanbase beloved his dogged style of play and durability. He arrived at SU in 2005 and ascended to stardom, sitting 14th on the program’s all-time scoring list. He went undrafted but played professionally in the NBA Gatorade League, then the Development League and overseas. From 2016-18, he fulfilled his late father’s wish to be on the Syracuse staff, where he molded head coach Jim Boeheim’s newcomers from stand-out high schoolers into college athletes at an ACC power.Then, last summer, Devendorf sacrificed his study under a Hall of Fame coach for a fledgling mid-major full of uncertainty. As special assistant to first-year head coach Mike Davis, Devendorf moved 400 miles east to a small Catholic school with less than one-quarter the enrollment of SU. Although he’s a 90-minute drive from his Bay City, Michigan hometown, he leaves behind his girlfriend, Triyah Jones, and two daughters, Madelyn (10) and Miranda (8) in Syracuse. He risked losing comfort to take a shot at his long-term goal.In his new role, Devendorf hopes to instill some of his own style. He believes in nurturing strong relationships with players, many of whom are only 10 years younger than he is. He’s learning to be patient with a roster of mostly freshmen at Detroit Mercy, which finished 8-24 last season.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textHe consulted the entire SU coaching staff before departing his alma mater, and he made sure Boeheim thought the move would propel him closer to his long-term goal of running his own Division I program. His former head coach, plus former associate head coach Mike Hopkins, both advised him to go.“It’s great for him to get a coaching job full-time,” Boeheim said. “He’s going to be a really good young coach.”Courtesy of Detroit Mercy AthleticsIn Calihan Hall in early January, Devendorf had Brandon and Nguidjol attack with power and make stronger moves with fewer dribbles. High above, three banners hung reflecting Detroit Mercy’s basketball history — just one NCAA Tournament appearance since 1999, when Devendorf was 12 years old. He left the packed Carrier Dome for the scarcely-attended arenas of the Horizon League, where only one team is guaranteed a ticket to the Big Dance.After an hour of drills, Devendorf threw his backpack over his shoulder, walked out of the building for lunch and spied his Nissan Rogue across the lot. The license plates still belonged to New York.“All of this is helping me be a head coach,” Devendorf said. “When that time comes, I know I’ll be ready.”—The clock hit 11 a.m. on Jan. 4, and Devendorf jogged to the 3-point line. He picked up a loose ball during an inside-move drill.“Come on, dawg! Left hand!,” he told Nguidjol. “You ain’t ever used that left hand in your life.”At Syracuse, Devendorf earned a reputation for a relentless work ethic, enthusiasm and bluntness. He brings the same style to a new place.Devendorf started at Oak Hill Academy in Virginia, playing alongside Kevin Durant. He switched his commitment from Michigan State to Syracuse, where he played for four seasons. From 2005 to 2009, Devendorf was a double-digit scorer in all four of his seasons playing for Syracuse. He made the Big East All-Rookie team as a freshman and averaged 14.5 points across 116 career games for SU.He developed a knack for community involvement. His philanthropic approach included aiding in the Jim and Juli Boeheim Foundation, the Flint water crisis and coat drives in Syracuse. After a storied career as a player — one that plastered him on the front of a 2007 issue of Sports Illustrated that still hangs in his room — he started a family in Syracuse.Jan. 13 marked three years since his father, Curt, died of cancer. Curt had put a ball in the hands of a young kid with a dream. Before Curt’s health deteriorated, he had hoped for Devendorf to one day join the Syracuse staff. Devendorf fulfilled Curt’s wish and bounded forward.“Leaving Syracuse was tough, and I didn’t want to,” said Devendorf, who still says “we” when he refers to the Syracuse men’s basketball team. “That was my family. I have a lot more responsibility now and I feel like a real assistant coach. I can still play with them, so I think that helps when I go to show them something. I can still do it. The experience here has been priceless.”Matthew Gutierrez | Senior Staff WriterIn late July, his iPhone’s ring altered his career trajectory. On the other end was Davis, the former Texas Southern coach who’d met Devendorf a few times. They had exchanged texts every few months. Then Davis called and offered him the job. “Kind of random,” Devendorf said. “I told him I had to talk to coach Boeheim about it, but it was a no-brainer.”Boeheim called Davis and told him he’d be getting a good coach. Within a few days, Devendorf kissed his girlfriend and two daughters goodbye, packed up his car and embarked on a new life.—Devendorf misses his family a lot. Every day, he FaceTimes home, and he plans to figure out his long-term situation after this season. Any chance he gets, he drives nearly seven hours each way from his two-bedroom place in Detroit to see his girls. They’re active in the Liverpool Central School District in third and fifth grade, respectively, while competing in swimming and cheerleading.“It’s tough being without them,” he said. “I wanted to keep them there for the year until I know where I’ll be long-term. Maybe they’ll come to Detroit next year.”After lunch, Devendorf drove back to campus and parked his car. He climbed the stairs from the court to the basketball suite, where the coaches’ offices reside. He walked to the back left. A sign reads, “Conference Room: 225E.” He placed down his backpack beside a chair.For a couple of hours before practice, he pulled out an iPad and studied film on the Titans’ next opponent, Northern Kentucky. Devendorf brought with him the Syracuse 2-3, which his new team is just starting to get the hang of. Detroit’s coaching staffers said they appreciate his 2-3 insight.With “Madelyn” tattooed on the back of his neck and a gallon of water on the table, Devendorf analyzed the Titans’ zone. He hears Boeheim’s voice in his head when teaching rotations. Watch the high post. Cover the shooters on the wings. For zone feedback, he’s texted Boeheim a few clips.High energy and reliability are the hallmarks of Devendorf’s coaching philosophy. He tweets motivational quotes and feeds his brain with self-help books. Now he’s reading, “Untethered Soul: The Journey Beyond Yourself.” As he hopes to rise in the coaching ranks, he wants to teach his players the power of a positive attitude.With his arms crossed near midcourt, he surveyed the defense in practice. He walked up to two players on the side of the court. He playfully grabbed their jersey and laughed. Then he high-fived freshman forward Willy Isiani, who requested a post-practice workout with Devendorf. A team manager noted that in his four years at Detroit, there’s been a “big jump” in the number of workouts outside of practice hours. Thanks to Devendorf.There are plenty of unknowns now. The Titans are a young team with a lot to prove. He doesn’t know what his next job will be. He’s unsure exactly when his girlfriend and two daughters will be able to move back in with him. Uncertainty followed him as he opened his car door outside the Detroit facility. But he’s found comfort in his new home, dragging along much of what he left.“You never know when your life could change on you,” he said, and he climbed inside the driver’s seat.last_img read more

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Success of Big Ship Music Festival Generates 2020 Staging

first_imgPHOTO CREDIT – GAIL ZUCKER PORT CHARLOTTE, Florida – After an enthusiastic response to its maiden voyage, the Big Ship Music Festival will return to Port Charlotte in northwest Florida next year.Promoter Freddie McGregor has confirmed July 4, 2020, as the date for the second staging of the festival at Port Charlotte Fairgrounds.The inaugural show took place at the Fairgrounds on July 6 and drew an encouraging 1,000 fans. McGregor, fellow singers Marcia Griffiths, Everton Blender, Glen Washington, Hopeton Lindo and Perfect Giddimani were the performers.“There were many highlights, from the setting-up of the venue to all the performances. I think the real highlight was Everton Blender’s performance,” said McGregor.The veteran artist said he chose Port Charlotte as the location for his latest crack at show promotion, because of its closeness to Tampa, Fort Myers and Naples, cities with strong Jamaican and West Indian populations.In addition, Port Charlotte, which has a population of just over 50,000 people, does not see a lot of reggae activity.McGregor is no stranger to show promotion, having produced events in South Florida, Los Angeles and his native Clarendon parish in Jamaica.It was the second show within 10 days for McGregor and Griffiths, who live in South Florida. They performed at Lauderhill Performing Arts Center on June 29.Currently promoting the single, Jah Is on My Mind, McGregor is set to tour the United States East Coast and Canada in August.last_img read more

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Kiron Powers first virtual golf game in partnership with SSE

first_img Share Related Articles Betgenius expands virtual sports range with Kiron August 20, 2020 Kiron extends Nordics presence with Complianza deal July 22, 2020 Share Submit StumbleUpon Sportradar supports snooker’s Championship League with data deal June 2, 2020 UpNdown Virtual golf, the “first of its kind instant-win golf game”, will be made available to operators in January through Kiron’s BetMan Online RGS – largest suite of virtual sports games in the market.For its latest release, the virtual games provider has partnered with SingleShot Entertainment (SSE), a company known for collecting and analysing data around professional golf and cue sport events.The game combines high-quality graphics with simple in-play betting options, marking it out as a product to engage and entertain players ‘on the go’.Steven Spartinos, CEO of Kiron Interactive, said: “Our partnership with SingleShot Entertainment allows us to once again expand our portfolio of titles and reach more players than ever before.“Golf is one of the most participated and bet on sports in the world and we are sure UpNdown Virtual Golf will appeal, thanks to its lifelike graphics and simple and fun betting options.”Jason Lahser, Founder of SingleShot Entertainment, added: “UpNdown Virtual Golf is our first venture into virtual sports and we are confident our partnership with Kiron will help make it a successful one.“They have delivered time and time again and have an impressive pedigree in creating unique and engaging virtual content. We look forward to a long and beneficial partnership with them.”UpNdown Virtual golf is the first virtual product for SSE, who expect to add ‘Neil Robertson 7BallRun’ – a game inspired by one of its board of directors, in the early part of 2019.last_img read more

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Sheriff: Florida Man Brutalized Dog, Baked It in Oven

first_imgA Florida man is charged with torturing and killing a dog that he later baked in an oven.According to a press release from the Lee County Sheriff’s Office, 24-year-old Lehigh Acres resident Vicasso Lara stabbed and beat the dog before placing it in an oven and heating it to its highest setting.“I’m speechless,” says Sheriff Carmine Marceno. “This is possibly the most brutal and horrific example of animal abuse my team or I have ever seen.”Courtesy: Lee County Sheriff’s Office/FacebookA neighbor called deputies to Lara’s home on Friday, claiming the man was making threats. They found pools of blood outside and bloody footprints leading inside the home, where they found the dog in the oven.Investigators explain Lara stabbed and bludgeoned the dog. He was being held in the county jail without bond Saturday. Jail records did not list a lawyer for Lara.last_img read more

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Lunch Break Facing Severe Shortage

first_imgRED BANK – Critical shortages of food are now being seen on the empty shelves at Lunch Break.Lunch Break is the first line of defense for thousands of people who struggle with hunger throughout Monmouth and Ocean counties, and is serving more and more people every year.According to Gwen Love, executive director of Lunch Break, the number of hot meals served has increased more than 68 percent in the last few years, and the food pantry distributions have increased a staggering 657 percent.Empty food pantry shelves are the result of a severe food shortage at Lunch Break in Red Bank where food distribution has increased by 657 percent during the past few years.“Last year, we served over 56,000 meals and over 500 families depend on Lunch Break every month for their groceries. Add to that our homebound program where we deliver meals six days a week to the elderly, ill, weak and disabled, and the numbers combined are frightening,” she said.“With summer vacation over and the push to get kids back to school and the signs of fall popping up everywhere, at Lunch Break the sign of fall is bare shelves in the pantry,” Love said. “The toughest times of year for us are September and October as well as February and March where we face critical shortages. We try to plan for these months, but with the daily increase in demand for our services, when the food is gone, it’s gone. It’s heart-wrenching to plan and not be able to meet the need. Right now, our resources are critically low.”A month ago Lunch Break was forced to reduce the amount of groceries provided to families from the food pantry.“It’s an overwhelming feeling,” Love said. “If we don’t get food, people are going to go hungry. We’re almost to the season of giving, but we’re not quite there yet. In November donations will really start to pick up, but right now, even though it’s a season of harvest, people just don’t stop to think about the need and that is why we are reaching out to the community. When people realize the need, they are tremendously generous,” Love said.Giving is very easy and safe by donating funds online at www.lunchbreak.org, and the organization also welcomes personal checks or cash at the Lunch Break facility at 121 Drs. James Parker Blvd.Monetary donations give Lunch Break the opportunity to plan meals weeks ahead of time and also give them immense purchasing power. People can also visit the website for the wish list of food items to be donated.“Unfortunately, it’s a sign of the times,” Love said.In a study released recently by the Legal Services of the New Jersey Poverty Research Institute, it concluded that more than 2 million people in New Jersey struggle to meet their basic needs. That represents a significant increase of more than 300,000 since the beginning of the economic recession.Nationally, the poverty line is defined at about $23,000 for a family of four. The study put the threshold at double that number because New Jersey’s cost of living is dramatically higher than the national average.“The worst part is,” Love said, “the study showed that children suffer the most.”Love added that many don’t know that Lunch Break is Monmouth County’s first and most accessible soup kitchen and food pantry, and this year celebrates 30 years alleviating hunger.“Our guests come from near and far – from Keansburg, Keyport, Union Beach, Seaside Heights, Point Pleasant, Neptune and Asbury Park – to name a few. We are open six days a week and we are so much more than a meal to so many. Our Suited for Success program last year outfitted over 125 individuals for job interviews, and we accept new and gently used clothing,” she said.“We provide families with holiday food baskets at Thanksgiving, Easter and Christmas; we offer cooking classes for children; a toy program for children over the December holidays and we partner with over a dozen local social service organizations to provide health screen­ings, visual testing, affordable housing referrals, veterans assistance, and more, all in our facility in Red Bank,” Love said.Lunch Break is located at 121 Drs. James Parker Blvd. in Red Bank, and can be reached at 732-747-8577. For more information about Lunch Break visit www.lunch break.org.last_img read more

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First Rumson Female Police Officer Best Candidate

first_imgBy Madelynne KislovskyRUMSON – The borough has a new police patrol officer on its staff that brings the quote from Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, “Though she be but little, she is fierce,” back to life.Grace Maggiulli, who describes herself as standing at 5’2, 120 pounds, is the first fulltime female police officer in the Rumson Police Department. Born, raised, and still living in Middletown, 20-year-old Maggiulli is “very excited to be where I am and start my career in Rumson. It’s a great town and a great community.”Although no members of her family have a career in law enforcement, Maggiulli knew it was the job for her after entering a vocational program for law enforcement in Long Branch, the Academy of Law and Public Safety Program, during her junior and senior year of high school.“I always knew I wanted to do something where I gave myself to others that wasn’t a teacher or a doctor. Law enforcement always seemed like a great way for me to do that,” Maggiulli said.Prior to her job as a police officer, Maggiulli began working as a dispatcher for the Rumson police in August 2014. “They were all already comfortable with me, and I received the same treatment as anyone else, male or female. There were no and there are no special accommodations,” said Maggiulli.Maggiulli said that regardless of gender, being a police officer demands the same things from all of its members. “The job is what the job is. I love being on the road, I love working, I love what I do and I can only imagine how things are going to be down the line. There’s not one thing I can complain about,” Maggiulli said.“Growing up, I was always friends with a lot of boys,” Maggiulli said. “When it came to working with all men, it didn’t strike me as something that would be a challenge. I believe that women do have a place in law enforcement. Although we’re small in numbers, we’re valued for what we do.” Maggiulli advises that if being in law enforcement is something that a woman wants to do and feels strongly about, nothing should hinder them.Rumson Mayor John Ekdahl administered the oath of office to Maggiulli on Sept. 28. “First of all, it’s an honor for us to welcome our first female police officer to the force. But I think it needs to be said that this was not an exercise in hiring a new female police officer. It was an exercise in hiring the best candidate that we felt was the right person for the Rumson Police Department going forward, and it just happened to be a female, Grace Maggiulli,” Mayor Ekdahl said.According to Ekdahl, it is not uncommon to begin a career in law enforcement in dispatch. Maggiulli succeeded in this area, and after taking the necessary classes in the Monmouth County Police Academy, Freehold, moved on to a Class II Special Officer, allowing her to go out on patrol with another officer present, which she also excelled at. Maggiulli then was chosen as a patrol officer over the other 25-30 applicants, making it a highly sought after job, according to Ekdahl.“Grace is definitely on the younger side of average for someone just entering a police force. But her maturity is well beyond her years, and she exhibited that as both a dispatcher and a Special II, and continues to show that as our newest officer,” said Mayor Ekdahl.Maggiulli graduated from Middletown High School North in 2013 and from Brookdale Community College, Middletown, with an associate’s degree this past May. She is taking online classes at Farleigh Dickinson University for her bachelor’s degree in administrative science, and hopes to get her masters in the same field.last_img read more

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New County Homeless Shelter to Cost More

first_imgBy Laura D.C. Kolnoski |OCEANPORT – As 2017 drew to a close, Monmouth County was preparing to solicit bids from firms interested in building a modular, prefabricated adult emergency homeless shelter on a 3.1-acre site on the former Fort Monmouth from plans prepared by the Spiezle Architectural Group of Hamilton.When potential bidders were contacted, however, officials discovered the timeline and costs would be impacted by a lack of availability of modular structures.“Prefabricated trailers have been scooped up due to natural disasters like hurricanes and fires around the country,” said Monmouth County Administrator Teri O’Connor on April 2. “What was available two years ago isn’t now. We haven’t given up hope on it, but we’re now looking at other options.”O’Connor said plans for the shelter have been expanded to include “stick built traditional construction,” adding the county is hopeful the original completion target for this fall can still be met.Original plans called for two prefabricated modular structures connected by a bridge portion at the corner of Courier Avenue and Murphy Drive.The site was conveyed to the county by the Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority (FMERA) in March for $1. The county’s original homeless shelter, located nearby on Stephenson Avenue, was destroyed in Super Storm Sandy in 2012. Since then, adults needing temporary shelter have been placed at the John L. Montgomery Care Center in Freehold, a former county facility that was sold to a private concern last year.By statute and agreement with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the county’s homeless shelter must be located in the Oceanport section of the fort. A suitable permanent site was identified last year and accepted by county, FMERA and Oceanport officials.FMERA is obligated by contract to reimburse the county for approved costs up to $1.5 million for demolition of two small existing buildings on the site, and design and construction of the new 4,080-square-foot emergency homeless shelter. Those monies come from the FMERA Homeless Trust Fund, funded by a percentage of each fort parcel closing. At the authority’s March 27 meeting, members approved transferring up to $450,000, primarily for preparatory work at the site, which proved more involved than originally anticipated.Costs “will substantially exceed the previously established $1.5 million budget based on their updated engineering and construction estimates” because of the revised quotes, according to the FMERA resolution authorizing the increase. These cost overruns prompted the county to request a proportion of funding from FMERA’s Homeless Trust Fund.Additional roadwork was required, O’Connor said, as FMERA opposed plans for including a side street the county planned to use as part of the project. Engineering and utility relocation work has been performed but additional work was required to improve ingress and egress. Other additional costs were incurred demolishing the two structures, which contained more asbestos than originally anticipated, O’Connor added. The site already includes a paved parking area.The adults-only facility will have one side for men and the other for women, with an area in between with a kitchen, laundry, a dining area and a common room, with space for security, counseling, clothing, a computer nook and staff. The Spiezle Architectural Group renderings released by the county last December are still valid, O’Connor said.The county houses a fluctuating number of about 18 up to 30 homeless adults who are required to work or look for work and permanent housing during daylight hours. Occupants are allowed to remain at the emergency shelter for a maximum of 30 days.“There are strict criteria participants must follow,” said Monmouth County Freeholder deputy director Lillian Burry, the county’s FMERA representative. “It’s an interim place to be sheltered until they can transition into new circumstances. This is something we’ve done for years for those who are in a temporary state of homelessness.”This article was first published in the Apr. 5-12, 2018 print edition of the Two River Times.last_img read more

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