Is that service? I don’t know.

first_img 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: John HycheIs that service?My sister recently sold her house.  Like most folks in that situation, she had big plans for the sales proceeds that required rather quick action to make all the transactions flow smoothly.  Thinking ahead (she’s always been one to worry about what’s beyond the horizon), she called her credit union to ask about their funds availability policy.She thought this was a question best posed to the member services department and called them.  What happened next falls into that “truth is stranger than fiction” category.Sis called during normal hours and got a friendly member service representative on the line.  She asked, “When will my funds be available from a very large deposit if I make the deposit tomorrow afternoon?”  Sounds pretty straight forward, right?  Then came the bewildering answer, “I don’t know.  That’s really a question for the tellers.”  The advice continued, “Just bring the check in and they’ll tell you how much you can have.”  Is that service?  It’s certainly not the answer my sister expected; it’s a non-answer at best.  Not only was the member service representative unable to clearly address the question, there was no referral to someone who could provide an answer during the phone call.Realizing that she’d stepped in a quagmire of ineptitude.  My sister called back and was able to get instructions for wiring the funds rather than risk a funds availability problem because the credit union couldn’t articulate their policy. continue reading »last_img read more

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Harris offers diversity, excitement for US Latino voters

first_imgAggressive Florida campaign In 2016, Trump won 30 percent of Latino voters, mostly Cuban Americans, who tend to vote Republican, but also military veterans and Central American evangelicals. Many of these groups are concentrated in the key battleground state of Florida. Christian Ulvert, a Democratic Party strategist in Miami, said his party was nevertheless winning over younger Cuban Americans, as well as Colombian immigrants and the large numbers of Puerto Ricans who moved to Florida after their home island was devastated by Hurricane Maria in 2017.  Ulvert said that with many voters undecided, his party was planning an “aggressive” campaign and that Harris is “a great asset.”Her record as a senator “fighting for access to health care, fighting for immigration reform and justice for our immigrant families, carries a lot of weight with Hispanic voters,” he said.The issue of Venezuela looms large among some Latino voters in Florida, and Trump has dubbed the country’s Socialist leader Nicolas Maduro a dictator.Harris has echoed that language and even promised to offer Venezuelans sheltering in the United States permission to stay while their country remains mired in political and economic chaos.She has stopped short however of backing the military intervention that many Venezuelan hardliners in Florida are calling for, and which they think Trump may ultimately support.  For the first time, people with roots in Latin America will be the largest minority bloc in the US presidential election, with an estimated 32 million eligible voters, or 13.3 percent of the total, according to the Pew Institute.In 2018 elections, when Trump’s Republican Party lost control of the House of Representatives, 69 percent of Latino votes went to Democrats.Christine Marie Sierra, professor emeritus of political science at the University of New Mexico, told AFP that Latino voters were already inclined to back the Democrats, but Harris “may change the enthusiasm level, which then translates into higher voting rates, which then translates to possible wins in a close election.”A recent poll showed that 59 percent of Latino voters in key battleground states were fired up about Harris’s selection as running mate, and 52 percent said her name on the ticket made them more likely to vote for 77-year-old former vice president Biden. “Tell me who you walk with, and I’ll tell you who you are,” proclaimed the first bilingual Spanish and English campaign ad by Democrat Joe Biden after he announced his running mate would be Senator Kamala Harris. “An ally, a champion of the Latino community,” the ad said of the vice presidential hopeful. A woman of color and daughter of immigrants, Harris can whip up enthusiasm among Latino voters, many of whom are turned off President Donald Trump. Immigration issues Trump, under fire for his chaotic response to the coronavirus pandemic and the economic crash it caused, has returned to his anti-immigration crusade to pump up his base and push for another term. “He doesn’t see immigrants as humans,” said Juan Escalante, a Venezuela activist covered by DACA, a program set up by former president Barack Obama to regularize the immigration status of hundreds of thousands of people who had arrived in the US illegally as children.Trump has tried to scrap the program.Biden has undergone close scrutiny of his role overseeing the Obama administration’s deportation of almost three million undocumented migrants, which has led some critics to call him the “deporter in chief.””His record on immigration may not be the best, but today he is showing people that he is trying to put forward real solutions and solve past errors,” said Escalante, a political scientist. In the Democratic primaries, progressive Bernie Sanders garnered more support from Latinos, in part because he proposed ending deportations and getting rid of the much-feared immigration police, ICE.   Biden, a moderate, did not go that far, but he has promised to protect DACA, push legislation to legalize the status of some 11 million undocumented migrants and reverse harsh asylum rules set up by Trump, which limit intake and obliges applicants to wait in Mexico while their claims are processed. “Stopping the Trump agenda would be enough to get the Latino vote for Biden, Harris,” Sierra said.center_img “Harris’s selection is an opportunity for Biden to capitalize on the Latino vote and mobilize young Latino voters,” said Anais Lopez, an analyst for Latino Decisions, which conducted the poll.Harris, the daughter of a Jamaican father and Indian mother, would be the first woman and the first person of color to occupy the office of vice president if Biden wins on November 3.  Topics :last_img read more

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Syracuse maintains ‘DNA,’ recovers after sloppy defensive start in 14-10 win over Johns Hopkins

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Comments Drake Porter walked 15 yards out of the net and looked right and left. “For a first-year starter,” Syracuse head coach John Desko said, Porter has brought a poised approach to many of those situations. He flagged a midfielder on the left side, and cradled. The ball popped from his pocket.But nobody came — Porter was alone. He scooped the ball and lifted his head. After the season-opener, where the Orange were dominated in possession, SU identified two problems that led a possession struggle: ground balls and clears. Porter was stout in the net, but defenders and the junior starting his first game action sometimes threw the ball away up the field. He improved, and the Orange did too.But Saturday, he was “anxious,” Desko said. He walked two more steps and fired the ball to the midfielder he saw open just seconds earlier. The Blue Jays countered with an interception. Porter turned, and bolted back to the net to stop Johns Hopkins, to stop the game from tumbling to disaster.In an eventual 14-10 win over the No. 18 Blue Jays (2-3), the No. 14 Orange (3-2, 0-1 Atlantic coast) nearly unraveled as a result from sloppy plays on the defensive side of the field. Misfires on clears, second-chances in front of the net and ground ball mishandlings from Syracuse propelled Johns Hopkins to an early lead, only to be flipped by a negation of those mistakes. The Orange, who repeatedly push from one end of the field to the other, were nearly undone by its transition-heavy style.“It’s in our DNA as players: we like to push the ball,” defensive midfielder Peter Dearth said. “Our whole defensive unit, we all feel capable…”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe Orange have long focused on their ability to maintain possession. It has been the reason behind many of its triumphs in the early part of the season, and their failure has exposed its worst stretches. Coming into the game, Johns Hopkins knew it needed to attack, goalkeeper Ryan Darby said. From the early part of the game, Blue Jays head coach Dave Pietramala said his team “pressed” with both its offensive and defensive unit.With a couple early wins on the faceoff, JHU went on a run and grabbed an early 5-1 lead. During the run, Porter’s saves found Johns Hopkins for second chances and the Orange frequently lost scrambles for ground balls in front of the net. Rather than sailing line drive shots to the right, left or above the cage, Johns Hopkins attack Kyle Marr said the Blue Jays aimed more frequently for Porter’s body. Though many of their early shots misfired, rebounds and resets gave the Blue Jays second-chances that — early in the game — it converted.When the possession leaned Syracuse’s way, the Orange tried to take advantage with plays in transition. Tyson Bomberry tried to cradle through multiple groups of Johns Hopkins defenders. He muscled through two defenders at the midline, but 10 yards later the ball popped out of his stick after two more JHU defenders trapped him on the sideline.Between mishandled passes on the offensive end and a few goals to gather a rhythm before the end of the first frame, Syracuse’s chances came at a premium. After a faceoff win, Jared Fernandez leapt and spun to pass the ball to midfield, but his pass found no one. Two quarters later, as the Orange tried to find room to push ahead, Bomberry’s pass fired wide to fellow-defender Nick Mellen on the sideline as the two athletic long poles tried to lead a break of their own.With the game tied at eight, Marcus Cunningham got a stick on a pass and knocked the ball to the ground. He scooped the ground ball, but it was popped out of his pocket and tumbled in the direction of the goal. The Blue Jays took advantage, and tallied a go-ahead score.Porter struggled to cradle the ball, midfielders and defenders struggled to pass the ball and the Syracuse struggled to string together multiple possessions.“I don’t know if it’s the tightness coming out,” Desko said of the sloppy play. “We’re 2-2, and we really wanted to get the win here in the Carrier Dome.”Johns Hopkins looked for inverts and defensive slides. In the first half, they got them. They sliced through Syracuse’s defense, fired once, and then fired again. The third quarter was “sloppy for both teams,” Pietramala said. But in the fourth quarter, Syracuse flipped the momentum.To counter free-flowing play in front of the net, the Orange ran a lot of zone defense, Desko said. The same plays that would give Johns Hopkins free space in the beginning of the game, Syracuse pushed another player up to bump out the Blue Jays attack. On multiple plays, Porter sprinted out of the net and pushed his stick forward on an attack by the crease. The offensive player, not expecting Porter’s hit, lost his balance and was forced to reset as Porter clamped back between the posts.The Orange ran Brett Kennedy and Jared Fernandez on the wings for the faceoffs, and SU dominated on ground balls, finishing with a 29-23 advantage after the first quarter.“11-2 in the fourth quarter on ground balls,” Pietramala said. “That says it all.”As Johns Hopkins “sat back” in the fourth, the Orange pushed forward. The Blue Jays knew the game plan — the one they had been practicing all week and the one that they perfected for most of the first half — to beat the Orange and force mistakes. But, in the fourth quarter, Syracuse took control, and JHU lost focus.Up two goals near the end of the fourth quarter, earlier sloppy play didn’t stop the Orange from going back to what it does best. Kennedy sprinted from the defensive end off a pass from Bomberry. The right sideline was open, and Kennedy attacked.“It was open,” Kennedy said, “… Why not just let it go?”Kennedy stopped, wound back and fired. After a game of back and forth play, the Orange didn’t let go of the style that’s in their “DNA.” And, finally, it worked.center_img Published on March 9, 2019 at 6:09 pm Contact Michael: [email protected] | @MikeJMcClearylast_img read more

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Wage law no longer living

first_img“Based on a comparison of the language in the old and new ordinances, the latter was enacted in bad faith with the intent to evade the effect of the referendum petition,” Yaffe wrote in his ruling. The ruling marked a major setback for the council and Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, who worked with the city’s powerful unions to craft the controversial living-wage ordinance. “The judge’s decision is shocking to me, and I expect the city attorney to appeal,” said Councilwoman Janice Hahn, who helped push for the law. “We should stop at nothing to ensure that the hotel workers along the Century Corridor are treated with dignity and respect. These men and women are the faces of Los Angeles hospitality to visitors to our city every day.” Mayor to review The Los Angeles City Council lost its legal showdown with the business community on Friday, when a judge struck down its effort to impose a living-wage ordinance on hotels near LAX. In a strongly worded ruling, Superior Court Judge David P. Yaffe said the council violated state law and acted in bad faith when it imposed the ordinance. Yaffe said the council tried to evade the state’s referendum law by repealing an initial living-wage ordinance after hotels and business groups gathered enough signatures to put the measure to a public vote. But the council adopted virtually the same law a few weeks later, the judge said. City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo’s office said he is considering the city’s options, and an aide to Villaraigosa said the mayor will review the decision. “The mayor believes that the workers at the Century Corridor hotels deserve a decent living wage,” said Parita Shah, spokeswoman for Villaraigosa. Los Angeles has had a living-wage requirement for more than a decade, but it had been applied only to firms doing business directly with the city. In expanding it to the hotels, the council argued that the facilities benefit from their proximity to Los Angeles International Airport and its city-funded improvements, and so they could be required to pay higher wages. The expanded living-wage law, first adopted in November, required 13 hotels along Century Boulevard to increase workers’ hourly pay to $9.39 with health insurance, or to $10.64 without health benefits. But hotels and business groups vigorously fought back, saying the city has no right to set wages for private-sector workers. They also worried that the law could set a precedent and lead to similar ordinances being expanded to other industries. The Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce teamed up with hotels and spent $800,000 to gather more than 103,000 signatures to put the ordinance on the May ballot with the hope that voters would overturn the law. Officials estimated that a referendum could have cost the city and business community as much as $15 million. To head off an expensive election, the City Council pledged to repeal the ordinance if the hotels agreed to a compromise that would include dropping the referendum. The council repealed the law in late January. But two weeks later it adopted a new measure that kept the living-wage requirements while promising $1 million in street improvements in the area and $50,000 to develop a marketing plan for a new Airport Hospitality Enhancement Zone. The new measure contained language designed to limit the expansion of the living-wage requirement to other business sectors. It also called for studies into a possible conference center and business-tax reductions for the area, as well as various studies on the impact of the living wage. But the new measure still frustrated business and hotel groups, who filed suit. Bait and switch In his ruling, the judge said enhancements that the council added to the measure were largely “illusory” and “vague commitments.” “These commitments are not sufficient to materially change the ordinance that the people demonstrated their hostility to by exercising their power of referendum,” Yaffe wrote. Councilmen Dennis Zine, Bernard Parks and Greig Smith had opposed the new ordinance, calling it a bait-and-switch tactic. “The judge’s ruling is exactly what we said,” Smith said Friday. “I’d be aghast if they appeal it because they’re going to lose again.” But community organizers who helped draft the living-wage law disagreed strongly with the judge’s ruling, saying they plan to keep fighting for higher pay for the nearly 3,500 hotel workers. “It’s disappointing to see the hotels continue to fight their workers,” said James Elmendorf, senior policy analyst for the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy. But Harvey Englander, who represents the Century Corridor hotels, said the City Council and mayor should never have moved forward with the second ordinance. “This now creates an opportunity – it’s a cooling-off period,” Englander said. “The council could bring this back in a year. We’re hoping to show the council that there is not a reason to.” [email protected] (213) 978-0390160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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