Santo Domingo House / Apaloosa Estudio de Arquitectura y Diseñ…

first_imgArchDaily Santo Domingo House / Apaloosa Estudio de Arquitectura y Diseño + Simetría Estudio de Arquitectura Save this picture!© Carlos Berdejo Mandujano+ 21Curated by Clara Ott Share Lead Architect: Photographs:  Carlos Berdejo Mandujano Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project CopyHouses•Tehuantepec, Mexico ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/911826/santo-domingo-house-apaloosa-estudio-de-arquitectura-y-diseno-plus-simetria-estudio-de-arquitectura Clipboard Luis Armando Gómez Solórzano, Emmanuel Coutiño Netro, Victor Ernesto López Cordero Santo Domingo House / Apaloosa Estudio de Arquitectura y Diseño + Simetría Estudio de ArquitecturaSave this projectSaveSanto Domingo House / Apaloosa Estudio de Arquitectura y Diseño + Simetría Estudio de Arquitectura Mexico Architects: Apaloosa Estudio de Arquitectura y Diseño, Simetría Estudio de Arquitectura Area Area of this architecture project Area:  102 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Builder:Apaloosa Estudio de ArquitecturaCity:TehuantepecCountry:MexicoMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Carlos Berdejo MandujanoRecommended ProductsDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile Curved Hinged Door | AlbaWoodEGGERLaminatesWindowspanoramah!®ah!38 – FlexibilityWindowsOTTOSTUMM | MOGSWindow Systems – BronzoFinestra B40″The container inside the container” both play an important role in the project, one can not be without the other and the spatial difference between them generates the required environment to provide amenity to the privacy of the users.Save this picture!© Carlos Berdejo MandujanoSave this picture!Save this picture!© Carlos Berdejo MandujanoA concept of housing that goes from introspection to perceptive amplitude, which takes advantage of the environment, but without dismantling it to the outside; the spatial distribution of each zone allows a metabolic program, this means that the project was not 100% built and a second stage will be built, without detracting from the essence of the concept.Save this picture!© Carlos Berdejo MandujanoExterior-transition-interior is the strategy that isolates solar heat incidence, in which the corridor is a spatial buffer between the garden and the habitable zone. The corridor (transition) is where things happen mostly for the user; rest, recreation, fun and reflection are executed without distinction or schedule.Save this picture!© Carlos Berdejo MandujanoThe social zone emerges purposely on its roof to absorb, sift and distribute natural light from the zenith. At the same time, it lets out the hot air of the humid Oaxacan summer, with its ventilation traps. The kitchen is dramatized with a change of textures and becomes intimate with its wood and dark covers, ideal for entertaining talks that the user requested from the project.Save this picture!© Carlos Berdejo MandujanoA second corridor, this time without longitudinal deployments, but if more intimate than the first one, is maintained to house the second bedroom, it can be intuited that it is not a corridor for visits, but for the smallest users of the house.102 m2 built contained in 480 m2 of container generate 378 m2 of green area. This proportion is favorable for a family that wants to spend their weekends in contact with nature, from their own home.Save this picture!© Carlos Berdejo MandujanoProject gallerySee allShow lessWorld’s First Floating Eco-Park Planned for Chicago RiverArchitecture NewsStatie Stuifduin -a2o-architectenArchitecture Books Share Photographs “COPY” Projects Year:  ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/911826/santo-domingo-house-apaloosa-estudio-de-arquitectura-y-diseno-plus-simetria-estudio-de-arquitectura Clipboard “COPY” Houses 2018 Manufacturers: Cemex, Arauco, Cuprum, Helvex, Interceramic, VALVO CopyAbout this officeApaloosa Estudio de Arquitectura y DiseñoOfficeFollowSimetría Estudio de ArquitecturaOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesTehuantepecMexicoPublished on February 20, 2019Cite: “Santo Domingo House / Apaloosa Estudio de Arquitectura y Diseño + Simetría Estudio de Arquitectura” [Casa Santo Domingo / Apaloosa Estudio de Arquitectura y Diseño + Simetría Estudio de Arquitectura] 20 Feb 2019. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldChoosing the Skyfold Wall for Your SpaceGlass3MSun Control Window Film in MarkthalBathroom AccessorieshansgroheBath & Shower ThermostatsCabinetsFlorenseCabinet – FloAirWood Boards / HPL PanelsBruagStair Railing – CELLON®LightsLouis PoulsenOutdoor Lighting – Flindt GardenBathroom AccessoriesBradley Corporation USAHigh Speed Hand Dryers – Aerix+BoardsForestOneLaminate – EGGER laminatesAcousticSchöckStaircase Insulation – Tronsole®Metal PanelsRHEINZINKPanel Systems – Horizontal PanelWall / Ceiling LightsA-LightAccolade Wall Light at River Dental OfficeBricksStröherClinker Brick Slips – StiltreuMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! 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FAS announces ethnicity, indigeneity, and migration positions

first_img An update on Harvard’s diversity, inclusion efforts Related The Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) will hire a cluster of faculty in the area of ethnicity, indigeneity, and migration during the upcoming academic year, Dean Claudine Gay announced.The hire of at least three to four cross-divisional scholars is a priority for Gay, who envisions the group as a first step in growing both faculty and scholarship across FAS in these fields. The new positions, in Asian American, Latinx, and Islam in America/Muslim American areas, will complement planned hires in other departments in the divisions of social science and arts and humanities.“During the last few years we have been building our research and teaching strength in these areas — with key faculty recruitments in Native American studies, for example — and this search is an opportunity to accelerate our efforts with a set of hires that we hope will be bold, field-defining and intellectually synergistic,” said Gay. “Ethnicity, indigeneity, and migration provides a valuable lens for understanding contemporary American society. It is no wonder that there is strong student and faculty interest in having this area more fully represented in our scholarly community, including in our curriculum. In fact, I imagine the candidates’ lecture series itself, which we hope all interested faculty and students will attend, will be a catalyzing intellectual moment for the FAS — and, perhaps, for this field more generally.”Dean of Arts and Humanities Robin Kelsey and Dean of Social Science Lawrence D. Bobo will co-lead the effort, and are currently assembling a search committee to be co-chaired by Mayra Rivera, chair of the Committee on Ethnicity, Migration, Rights (EMR), and Mary C. Waters, John L. Loeb Professor of Sociology. Gay charged Rivera and Waters as necessary leadership that she hopes will, ultimately, inspire a new concentration in ethnicity and migration.Said Bobo: “This is an enormously exciting development, and one that will position us to move forward confidently in developing the kind of strength we need in ethnicity, indigeneity, and migration. These hires will assure that senior faculty are present and provide the intellectual leadership and agenda-setting we need to build a successful program.” “Ethnicity, indigeneity, and migration provides a valuable lens for understanding contemporary American society.” — Claudine Gay, FAS dean Seminar addresses racism, politics, poverty, and privilege Equally enthusiastic was Kelsey, who called the interdivisional nature of the search committee “highly unusual, if not unprecedented.” The benefits, he noted, are three-fold. “This acknowledges that much of the work in ethnic studies straddles arts and humanities and the social sciences. It also lays the groundwork for greater cooperation going forward,” he said. “Finally, the lines separating divisions are inevitably somewhat arbitrary and we can’t let them impede us as we pursue our intellectual objectives. This gives us the latitude to seek excellence wherever it may be found, whether it’s someone whose trained in sociology, literary studies, the history of music, or some other field.”Alice Cheng ’20, a member of the student-and-alumni group Harvard Ethnic Studies Coalition (HESC) who is concentrating in economics with a secondary in EMR, called the development “very exciting” but stressed the need for structure in Ethnic Studies.“We are a little cautious because Harvard bureaucracy is very slow, and we want to make sure these faculty are hired into a supportive structure that compensates faculty for their program-building work, something that we have not yet been promised,” said the Winthrop House resident. “But we’re also optimistic that eventually, through these cohort hires and building a supportive structure, there can be a robust pathway for ethnic studies for undergrads.”Liren Ma ’20 looks forward to attending the lecture series and meeting the candidates. Said the 22-year-old, who is studying sociology and statistics with a secondary in EMR and a member of HESC, “The primary goal in any push for ethnic studies has been for raw resources for new scholars and new courses. That is at the heart of it is what everyone wants. Personally, I’m most invested in Asian American Studies scholarship, but in terms of the broad movement, no particular field matters more than [any] other. It’s about building robust options for everyone in all the tracks.”And that, Kelsey said, is what makes the undertaking so consequential.“Ethnic studies should look different at Harvard,” he said. “From my perspective, as we conduct this search and move forward afterward, we will be seeking a way for Harvard to put a distinctive stamp on it. And we seek to do that not because it’s important in itself, but because no place can bring to ethnic studies the range of expertise we can.” In Q&A session, John Wilson says mission of ‘inclusive excellence’ is underway Diversity and dialogue in an age of divisionlast_img read more

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