The Fundamentals of Freddie Mac

first_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Share Save Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Delinquencies Fannie Mae Foreclosure Freddie Mac GSEs Mortgages 2019-03-26 Seth Welborn Home / Daily Dose / The Fundamentals of Freddie Mac Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Tagged with: Delinquencies Fannie Mae Foreclosure Freddie Mac GSEs Mortgages Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. in Daily Dose, Featured, Foreclosure, Market Studies, News March 26, 2019 2,321 Views center_img The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago  Print This Post The Fundamentals of Freddie Mac Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Previous: If It’s a Buyer’s Market, Do the Homebuyers Know? Next: Savings Clauses in Foreclosure Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Related Articles Freddie Mac has released its Monthly Volume Summary for February 2019, which provides information on the GSE’s mortgage-related portfolios, securities issuance, risk management, delinquencies, debt activities, and other investments.According to the Summary, Freddie Mac’s total mortgage portfolio increased at an annualized rate of 3.0 percent in February 2019, while mortgage-related securities and other mortgage-related investments increased at an annualized rate of 2.7 percent that month. Freddie Mac’s aggregate unpaid principal balance on its mortgage-related portfolio increased by around $200 million in February.Additionally, Freddie Mac noted that its single-family serious delinquency rate dropped by one basis point month over month, down from 70 basis points in January to 69 basis points in February. Since the start of conservatorships in September 2008, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have completed a total of 4,283,836 foreclosure prevention actions, according to the Q4 2018 Foreclosure Prevention Report from the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA). In Q4 2018 alone, the GSEs completed 41,062 foreclosure prevention actions. According to the FHFA, 3,591,985 of the foreclosure prevention actions completed since 2008 have been resulted in homeowners staying in their homes, while 2,314,121 actions have been permanent loan modifications.According the the report, both Fannie and Freddie have seen their mortgage performance improved overall as of Q4 2018: the percentage of 60+ days delinquent loans dropped from 1.13 percent at the end of the third quarter to 1.08 percent at the end of the fourth quarter. Additionally, the Fannie and Freddie’s serious (90 days or more) delinquency rate decreased to 0.73 percent at the end of the fourth quarter. This compared with 3.8 percent for Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loans, 2.0 percent for Veterans Affairs (VA) loans, and 2.1percent for all loans. Foreclosure starts increased 11 percent to 36,002 while third-party and foreclosure sales decreased 8 percent to 11,510 in the Q4 2018.Q4 2018 also saw 1,781 completed short sales and deeds-in-lieu, which brings Fannie and Freddie’s total to 691,851.”The number of completed short sales and deeds-in-lieu decreased 18 percent in the fourth quarter compared with the third quarter of 2018,” the FHFA stated. “These foreclosure alternatives help to reduce the severity of losses resulting from a borrower’s default and minimize the impact of foreclosures on borrowers, communities, and neighborhoods.” About Author: Seth Welborn The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

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School transport issue in Donegal turning into ‘crisis’

first_img WhatsApp School transport issue in Donegal turning into ‘crisis’ Twitter Pinterest AudioHomepage BannerNews Previous articleBronze Age urn unearthed in DonegalNext articleColeman or Doherty – Tough decisions ahead for Kenny News Highland Pinterest Facebook WhatsApp Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows By News Highland – September 3, 2020 Google+center_img Twitter Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Google+ A Donegal Deputy is urging the Government to provide immediate additional resources to Bus Eireann and to private bus operators. Many local families are still trying to secure a place on the school bus for this current academic year with parents having to car pool in the interim and while Bus Eireann is currently allowing buses to run at full capacity; it intends to reduce that to 50% when possible.For example, if that were to be implemented, it would take up to nine school buses to service the Newtowncunningham area alone.Deputy Padraig MacLochlainn says this is turning into a crisis and the Government must step in:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/padlkjlkljklraigbus.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Community Enhancement Programme open for applicationslast_img read more

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Judge declines to dismiss charges against Harvey Weinstein

first_imgKENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — The remaining criminal charges against Harvey Weinstein were upheld Thursday morning by a New York judge, who rejected a request by the disgraced film producer’s attorneys to drop them.The decision by state Supreme Court Justice James Burke clears the way for prosecutors to try Weinstein, who faces five counts, including rape. Weinstein is charged with raping a woman in a hotel room in March 2013 and forcibly performing oral sex on another woman in 2006 at his Manhattan apartment. He has denied all allegations of non-consensual sex.The Manhattan District Attorney’s office already agreed to drop one of the charges after it learned a lead police detective in the case instructed a potential witness to keep certain doubts to herself.The defense has said the conduct of the detective “irreparably tainted” the entire case but prosecutors have said there is “ample evidence” to proceed.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Following the clues

first_imgResearchers at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and Children’s Hospital Boston have retraced the evolution of an unusual bacterial infection as it spread among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients by sequencing scores of samples collected during the outbreak, since contained. A significant achievement in genetic pathology, the work also suggests a new way to recognize adaptive mutations — to see evolution as it happens — and sheds light on how our bodies resist infection.The results were published online Nov. 13 in Nature Genetics.Cystic fibrosis is a hereditary disease that renders the lungs susceptible to bacterial infection. Though there is no cure for CF, it is managed with antibiotics and therapies that remove mucous from the lungs. An infection that resists antibiotics can overwhelm the body’s defenses and lead eventually to respiratory failure and death, but advances in care have increased the median life expectancy for Americans born with CF from six months in 1959 to nearly 40 years today.Despite constant vigilance, outbreaks pose a particular risk at CF treatment centers, where otherwise rare strains of bacteria can spread between patients. In the 1990s, one such outbreak spread among CF patients followed at a single CF center in Boston. Thirty-nine people were infected with the strain, later identified as a new species of bacteria, Burkholderia dolosa.The hospital implemented new infection control measures and has not seen a new case in more than six years. But the outbreak presented researchers with a rare opportunity: a new pathogen with a closed circle of infection and abundant samples collected over the span of a decade.Roy Kishony was looking for just such a bug. The HMS professor of systems biology studies bacterial evolution, exploring such questions as how antibiotic resistance arises. Many of his experiments are conducted in the lab: Grow bacteria in a test tube, add just enough antibiotic to challenge it, and look for genetic changes over time. But people aren’t test tubes, and Kishony wanted to investigate how a pathogen evolves in a natural context.“Imagine if you could interrogate the bacteria,” said Kishony, principal investigator on the study. “You would ask, ‘What do you find most challenging in the human body?’”In search of a good model system, Kishony and his graduate student Jean-Baptiste Michel consulted clinicians and found their way to Alexander McAdam, an associate professor of pathology at Children’s Hospital Boston, who suggested B. dolosa. “I thought it would be interesting because we could also see how the organism changed during the course of an outbreak,” McAdam said.From that conversation grew a robust collaboration among a diverse team of scientists and clinicians, including Kishony’s lab, McAdam, and Greg Priebe, assistant professor of anesthesia at Children’s and a microbiologist at the Channing Laboratory of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, as well as collaborators in Michigan and Virginia. The team set out to sequence the genomes of 112 B. dolosa isolates taken from 14 of the infected patients, mapping genetic changes over time to reveal both the route of the infection’s spread and which genes faced the greatest selective pressure — in other words, how the bacteria evolved when challenged by human defenses and medical treatment.Every time a cell divides, small copying errors can introduce slight changes in the new DNA. Some of those changes affect the cell’s machinery, and some do not.  To identify selective pressure on genes over generations, scientists compare the number of significant changes to the number of those that had no effect — a measure called the dN/dS ratio.When Jean-Baptiste Michel and Tami Lieberman (pictured) crunched the numbers on their B. dolosa samples, the dN/dS ratio was 1.0. Across the genomes of their entire sample set, the changes appeared perfectly random. “It wasn’t a small effect,” Lieberman said. “It was no effect.” Photo by Remy Chait“That’s where we ran into a bit of a snag,” said Michel, now a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University and visiting faculty at Google, who analyzed the data with Tami Lieberman when both were graduate students in systems biology.But the finding defied previous observations and common sense — bacteria face pressure from antibiotics, pressure from the immune system, pressure from one another. Even in test tubes, bacteria evolve.Maybe, Lieberman suggested, they were asking the wrong question. What if the genomewide dN/dS ratio was a red herring, when what they really wanted to know was what was happening to specific genes? “Tami had the key insight,” said Kishony. If a mutation has any effect, it’s typically harmful. Randomly tune your car, and you’re apt to get a broken car. In a gene pool, purifying selection weeds out those harmful changes even as positive selection spreads helpful ones. Average those positive and negative effects, and both might disappear.Sure enough, when Lieberman and Michel analyzed the same data another way — separating genes that had mutated in multiple patients from those that had mutated just once — most genes registered a dN/dS of slightly less than one, evidence of widespread purifying selection. Seventeen genes scored much higher, strong evidence of positive selection. Tellingly, bacteria from different patients showed pressure on the same genes, which evolved in similar ways.“These data told us what the pathogen experiences as its main challenges,” Kishony said. Some of those challenges were expected: Genes linked to antibiotic resistance, adhesion, and immune response faced pressure to adapt.One of the most striking findings among such genes was a stop codon, seen in approximately 70 percent of the strains, in a previously unstudied enzyme linked to genes involved in the synthesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), also known as endotoxin.  The Priebe lab and collaborators had previously observed an unusual degree of LPS variation among B. dolosa strains and now had a genetic mechanism to explain it. “That finding was a real ‘aha’ moment for me,” said Priebe, who suggested that the enzyme could be disappearing as the bacteria adapted to evade the immune system, adhere to its host, or improve a function still undiscovered.Other challenges were a surprise, such as propelling furious changes in genes linked to growth under low-oxygen conditions typical of the lung of a CF patient. “This method suggests therapeutic directions we didn’t know were important,” Michel said, “and drug targets we didn’t know existed.”The team’s findings could help researchers better understand a pathogen’s strengths and weaknesses, the mechanisms by which it adapts to our defenses, and potential targets for new therapies. The researchers next hope to study the diversity generated by a pathogen’s evolution within a single patient, to learn more about the different challenges posed throughout the human body.The questions are still evolving.This research was funded by the National Institutes of Health, the New England Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, and the Harvard Catalyst.last_img read more

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Dominica To Formulate Strategy For Development Of ICT In Education

first_img Share Sharing is caring! Tweet Share (L-R): Chief Education Officer Steve Hyacinth and Neil Butcher, Educational Technology Specialist seated to the extreme right. Photo credit: Dionne Durand.Roseau, Dominica –-Dominica is on course to take the lead among its regional counterparts in the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in education.“I think even though the ICT investments in Dominica are not necessarily as large as in other countries, you are well placed to be a regional leader and potentially a global leader,” said Educational Technology Specialist Neil Butcher, following a fact finding mission here to develop a three-year strategy for the professional development of teachers in ICT Education.Butcher who has conducted similar missions in several other Caribbean countries, said he had explored with the Ministry of Education and Human Resource Development, strategies to support teachers in developing the skills to use ICT effectively in schools.“What we have found in Dominica so far has been a growing level of investment in ICT infrastructure, a degree of professional development activities, but above all, a tremendous passion and commitment for use of ICT in education in this country.“So we think there is tremendous opportunity here because there is a committed workforce with people who want to move Dominica forward through effective use of ICT in schools,” he said.Butler addressing participants. Photo credit: Dionne DurandAccording to Butcher’s findings, several investments have been made in ICT in Education in Dominica as a significant number of schools have been equipped with fully functional computer labs. The Education Management Information System (EMIS) will also be compulsory in all schools by the end of 2012 and under the Free Internet for Schools Programme, 2 mbps internet connectivity has been supplied to most schools free of charge compliments telecommunications provider LIME.The mission also concluded that based on the commitment of policy makers to the advancement of the ICT sector, “the funding for programmes will continue to increase and not decrease” giving Dominica a competitive advantage in ICT development.Priority areas for the development of ICT in Education include the completion of a capacity audit for target audiences such as Curriculum Officers, ICT Officers and staff of the Dominica State College (DSC). There are also plans to review the current ICT modules in the Associate Degree Programme at the DSC and introduce an online certificate programme in ICT in Education for primary and secondary school teachers.The programme is sponsored by Commonwealth of Learning, The Commonwealth Secretariat, UNESCO, and Microsoft.By: Dionne DurandPublic Relations Specialist, Ministry of Education and Human Resource Developmentcenter_img 88 Views   2 comments Share EducationLocalNewsPrimarySecondaryTertiary Dominica To Formulate Strategy For Development Of ICT In Education by: – February 4, 2012last_img read more

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ACC cancels class Monday and Tuesday to prevent the spread of Coronavirus

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisALPENA, Mich. —  All Alpena Community College classes will be cancelled Monday and Tuesday, March 16 and 17.Faculty, however, should report to their offices on Monday at 9 a.m. A department chair meeting will be held at the same time in room BTC 126. The college is instructing students, faculty, and staff to monitor their ACC email accounts, the ACC COVID-19 website, and school messenger for more information regarding when classes will resume, and any other information that will be distributed in response to Coronavirus.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThis Tags: ACC, alpena community college, coronavirusContinue ReadingPrevious APS responds to Coronavirus outbreakNext MDHHS announces additional cases of COVID-19last_img read more

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