Imani Lansiquot on cultural change, inspiring black athletes and interviewing Ebony Rainford-Brent | Athletics News

first_img Ebony Rainford-Brent reveals to Imani Lansiquot what she would change if she was aged 22 again! Heroic EbonyI had the pleasure of speaking with Ebony Rainford-Brent. Not only was it a huge honour to talk to one of my sporting heroes, but it was so eye-opening to gain greater insight into her story.I was taken aback by her determination, grit and ambition, and it was made even more empowering to find out that we came from similar south London backgrounds with Caribbean heritage.Ebony has experienced so many situations where she has had to be “the first” for women and black women in the world of cricket.Despite this, she seemed unfazed and took it all in her stride.She had a goal and wouldn’t let anything get in her way, and it never came into question where she was from, or the colour of her skin, and she let her performances do all the talking!Black History MonthKeep across all our features, news stories and video content on Sky Sports News and our Sky Sports platforms. Check out all our Black History Month content here Imani Lansiquot reflects on a “harrowing” year, the reawakening of the Black Lives Matter movement, interviewing Ebony Rainford-Brent and her dreams of helping to end “ingrained racism within our culture” By Mark AshendenLast Updated: 04/11/20 11:22pm Imani reveals how cricket has been inspirational in her family, while Ebony Rainford-Brent admits her passions for shot put! Evoking a change to culture requires consistent action and conversation over a long period of time. It requires a commitment to understand a topic that has no immediate solution or repair. It means turning conversations about negative experiences or ideologies into positive actionable goals.There is a rich history of black sporting icons being pioneers of “culture change”. From Mohammed Ali to Serena Williams, Lewis Hamilton to Ebony Rainford-Brent, we have seen time and time again how sport can greatly impact the conversation around racism.Alongside this, sport plays such a huge role in one of my favourite quotes: “if you can see it, you can be it”.From first-hand experience, seeing somebody who looks like you breaking boundaries and gaining success opens endless doors for young people who may not have believed they could. It actively changes the culture by influencing the next generation to aspire for more.I will feel accomplished in my sporting career if I can say that I played a part in changing the culture and continuing the conversations. – Advertisement – Ebony Rainford-Brent tells Imani Lansiquot you need to be brave to follow your heart and overcome fear to succeed Of course, medals and fast times will play a paramount role in my legacy, but what is also very close to my heart is ensuring that I am showing the next young black boy or girl coming up that the possibilities are endless and that their potential exists and matters.This Black History Month, of course, it is a time to celebrate positive black icons and understand that they play an integral role within the tapestry of all of our histories.But we should also understand that the culture-change doesn’t stop here. It is a long-term commitment to breaking the wheel, continuously educating ourselves and inspiring the younger versions of ourselves to know better and do better, no matter where you are from.How can we make real change?I am an avid believer that culture change has to start with the individual. We cannot wish for big changes in equality and diversity if we, as individuals, have not checked our own level of understanding.This starts with educating ourselves better on the contributions of black British history to our nation’s history as a whole.It is about understanding that this contribution is woven into our healthcare, our popular culture, our sports, our enterprise and so many other industries and not limiting this acknowledgement to just October.In the workplace, it is about recognising that diversity in the workplace goes beyond a “tick-box” exercise, but instead enriches and develops the future by bringing different backgrounds and opinions to the table. 2:16 Ebony Rainford-Brent reveals to Imani Lansiquot what she would change if she was aged 22 again! – Advertisement – Sport inspires unity, says Ebony Rainford-Brent who opens up to Imani Lansiquot on fighting for diversity and equality With Black History Month drawing to a close, British sprinter Imani Lansiquot is demanding more positive action that goes beyond hashtags as she dreams of medals on the track and inspiring cultural change off it.The 22-year-old Sky Sports Scholar opens her heart on the Black Lives Matter movement, inspiring and educating the next generation and how interviewing cricket legend and broadcaster Ebony Rainford-Brent has given her a big lift…The year 2020 has been an eye-opener to say the very least. A harsh light was shone onto current social affairs that both unified and divided parts of the country and forced us all to ask uncomfortably important questions that felt defining for the future.The reawakening of the Black Lives Matter movement this year was probably one of the most emotionally harrowing times I have ever had as a young black woman in the UK.The movement forced us all to face the reminder that while it may feel we have come a long way, we still have so far to go in terms of changing a culture and putting a stop to ingrained racism within our culture.In this, I feel it is so important for us all to remember that changing a culture goes beyond that ‘flash in the pan’ moment.It goes beyond posting a hashtag or black square on your social media account. It even goes beyond October’s Black History Month.center_img Sport inspires unity, says Ebony Rainford-Brent who opens up to Imani Lansiquot on fighting for diversity and equality 2:02 Ebony Rainford-Brent tells Imani Lansiquot you need to be brave to follow your heart and overcome fear to succeed 1:35 Imani reveals how cricket has been inspirational in her family, while Ebony Rainford-Brent admits her passions for shot put! – Advertisement – 2:09 – Advertisement –last_img read more

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City League basketball preview…Westinghouse girls hope to continue reign

first_imgSchenley lost one of the most talented girls high school players in the nation in Markell Walker to graduation. The McDonald’s All-American is now attending UCLA and is a freshman guard on their women’s basketball team. This opens the door for London McCoy and Shaunice Lightfoot standing at 5-8 and 5-9 respectively to do some damage for the Lady Spartans this year. They hope to match an excellent season in 2008-09 in which they tied a league-high 21 wins. MICKITA WHITE of Westinghouse plays tough defense against Brashear’s ASHLEE ALBRIGHT. The Lady Spartans, however, suffered a devastating 52-51 loss to Westinghouse in the City League title game.“I truly believe that any team can win on any given day,” said Westinghouse’s head coach Phyllis Jones. “I’ve seen good things out of (for example) Peabody, Allderdice, Perry, and Oliver. It is truly a wide open field (as opposed to previous years.)”In order for the Spartans to rebound, they must first concentrate on the defending champion Bulldogs who will have Jones back for her 20th season as head coach. They have built a solid tradition in their program as they’ve appeared in 22 straight title games.The Bulldogs welcome back lone starter Tatayanna Cox-Taylor, a senior guard, and also hope to see their 6-2 center Marritta Gillcrease use her height to be more productive for Westinghouse this season.“We are a young team and we have a lot to learn. I’ve done more teaching than usual this year, for certain,” said Jones. “It’s my hope that we can make it back to the big stage but we will have to win some big ones down the stretch.”Perry was the only other winning team in the League last year with a record of 15-7.Brashear, who finished just about in the middle of the pack with a 1-5 conference record last season, will feature two girls who hope to make an impact this season for the Bulls. They are the 5-8 sophomore guard Ashley Albright and 6 foot power forward Antwanette Williams.“We’re getting better,” said Brashear’s head coach Bob Fazio. “I think we may end up close to where we were last season but our team is still young and certainly improving.”Oliver is in the same predicament as they surprised many with their 2-2 conference record.(D.W. Howze can be reached at [email protected])last_img read more

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Arrow goes through Indian archer’s shoulder bone during training in freak accident!

first_imgImage Courtesy: ANI/NDTVAdvertisement hng4yNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs8euWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E4tjmc( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 8wkfkWould you ever consider trying this?😱1sc552Can your students do this? 🌚7sslRoller skating! Powered by Firework A very unfortunate event has occured in the sport of Archery yesterday, as a young archer from Assam named Shivangini Gohain has been injured during training session. The 12 year old has been admitted to the All India Institute of Medical Science Trauma Centre in New Delhi. Following a surgery today, the teenager has been shifted to ICU for further medical investigation.Advertisement Image Courtesy: ANI/NDTVDuring her practice session at the Dakha Devi Rasiwasia College in Chabua in the district of Dubrugarh, Shivangini met with the accident. The arrow, measuring 15 cm, pierced her shoulder, damaging her shoulder bone and left lung, and lodged itself with a slight contact with the vertebral artery.“She was admitted to the hospital at around 8 pm. Doctors are examining her and she is undergoing investigations. A decision on the course of treatment to be provided to her or performing a surgery will be taken soon,” a senior doctor present at the Trauma Centre said yesterday after her admission.Advertisement Dr. Deepak Gupta, a professor of neurosurgery at AIIMS had spoken to the reporters following Shivangini’s admission. “Around 0.5 cm of the arrow was in front of the spinal cord. It was a very complex surgery,” the doctor told reporters.Shivangini, who hails from Deodhai village, was training alone without the presence of her coach, former Indian archer Mercy Ignatius, as confirmed by the Assam Archery Association.Advertisement The joint secretary, Pulin Das spoke about the occurence of the tragic incident. “There is a SAI contractual coach, Marcy, and he has left for the Khelo India Games in Guwahati.” Pulin spoke to PTI over a phone session.He also added that the principal of Dakha Devi Rasiwasia College was not supervising Shivangini, and local officials were also absent from the spot.He continued: “He didn’t instruct the trainees to stop the camp for some time nor did the college principal, who acted as administrator of the extension centre, looked after the practice,”Brinchi Gohain, Shivangini’s father was present outside the practice arena, and he alone had to take his injured daughter  to the Assam Medical College in Dibrugarh, which is 33 km away from Chabua.“I was told that she had a very tough time as the arrow remained stuck for more than a day. She is a strong-willed girl and she fought. Her father must be a daily wage labourer and he was distraught also,” Das added.The Dakha Devi Rasiwasia College, where the mishap took place, falls under the Sports Authority of India (SAI) Regional Centre of Guwahati. A spokesperson said yesterday that Shivangini was taken to Delhi by air, and SAI will be undertaking the cost of her treatment.Also read-Wriddhiman Saha undergoes surgery for finger injury in MumbaiBoxer Manoj Kumar accuses Sports Authority of India for not providing financial help after injury Advertisementlast_img read more

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