RSF reiterates call for independent probe into Maltese journalist’s murder

first_img Organisation News December 7, 2017 RSF reiterates call for independent probe into Maltese journalist’s murder Protecting journalists CorruptionConflicts of interestJudicial harassment A suspect exits the Law Courts in Valletta, Malta on December 6, 2017, after being charged with the murder of blogger and journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia / AFP RSF_en center_img Following this week’s announced arrests of ten suspects in Malta’s investigation into anti-corruption journalist and blogger Daphne Caruana Galizia’s murder on 16 October, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) reiterates its call for a full and independent investigation to bring those responsible to justice. Under European Union pressure for results, Maltese Prime Minister Joseph Muscat announced on 4 December that ten suspects had been arrested. They were the first arrests in the case, in which the government has been accused of both political interference and incompetence.Caruana Galizia’s family has issued a statement expressing astonishment that the arrests were announced by the prime minister and not by the police, as should be the case in this kind of investigation.The statement also draws attention to other irregularities, including the fact that the names of the suspects were released and that the magistrate who issued the arrest warrant was not the investigating magistrate in charge of the case.The family also said it was concerned that “a number of people who could be implicated continue to receive political cover for crimes they are widely reported to have committed.” As there was no sign that the investigation was being conducted in an independent manner, the family would continue to demand an “independent and impartial investigation,” the statement added.“In the nearly two months since Daphne Caruana Galizia’s death, the authorities have been unable to show that they are conducting their investigation in an impartial manner, so we support the family’s request and we call for an independent international investigation to establish all the facts of her shocking murder,” said Pauline Adès-Mével, the head of RSF’s EU-Balkans desk.The murder of Caruana Galizia, who often accused both Maltese government and opposition of corruption on her blog, has raised EU concerns about the rule of law in Malta.A European Parliament delegation tasked with examining the situation in Malta made an exploratory visit to the capital, Valetta, last week and confirmed its concerns on its return. There was also grave concern about the death threats made against members of the delegation ahead of the visit.Malta is currently ranked 47th out of 180 countries in RSF’s World Press Freedom Index. Protecting journalists CorruptionConflicts of interestJudicial harassment Help by sharing this informationlast_img read more

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Going for the Jaguar

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Going for the JaguarOn 1 Oct 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article The revival of the ailing Halewood car plant on Merseysidehas been likened to a blood transfusion, replacing the corporate blue of Fordwith the green of Jaguar. Guy Sheppard discovers how training helped deliverenormous changesFor motorists, buying a Jaguar is a leap which many will aspire to. For themanufacturer, switching from a mass-produced car to a prestigious marque likeJaguar represents a huge change in company culture and working practices. Most of the Halewood plant on Merseyside was stripped bare last year whenproduction of the Ford Escort was replaced by Jaguar’s new X-Type. The newmanufacturing facilities cost £300m, but the transformation among the3,000-strong workforce was equally far-reaching, with each employee receivingan average of 350 hours of re-training. With the Escort’s fast-moving assembly line, tasks assigned to eachindividual would often only take a few seconds to complete. Under Jaguar, because of the new vehicle’s relative complexity, the taskstake much longer and require far greater skills. Phil Round, Halewood education and training manager, says the X-Typecontains sophisticated technologies such as fibre optics and satellitenavigation systems. “For auto electricians, for example, we had to move a group of peoplefrom very basic electronics to rocket science. With the Escort, it wasrelatively straightforward and people could manage with a basic set of tools.With the Jaguar, a more common tool would be a laptop for diagnostics.” Workers have had to adopt far higher standards of workmanship and learn newskills to meet the waste-free, low-inventory requirements of “leanmanufacturing” that Jaguar insists on. “In the past, you could leaveyour brain at the door, do your eight hours and then go home,” Round says.The task of training the workforce for this more exacting environment wasmade all the more daunting by Halewood’s past record. Productivity levels were low compared to Ford plants elsewhere in Europe andin the mid-1990s the plant was earmarked for closure. Although largely strikefree, industrial relations were far from harmonious. Outmoded Practices Halewood’s operations manager David Hudson, who was transferred fromJaguar’s West Midland headquarters, says relations were characterised by a”them and us” attitude. “We had to get rid of outmoded practices and persuade people to adoptmore flexible working patterns, with the emphasis on delivering quality. “Even more fundamentally, we had to get the workforce on side. We alsohad to overcome some understandable scepticism and convince them we wereserious about delivering change,” he says. One of the main planks of the training programme was, therefore, to create amore open and participative working environment. Tony Woodley, national automotive secretary for the Transport & GeneralWorkers Union, which led the joint union campaign to save the plant, says thechanges were too quick and unpalatable for some. “It would be dishonest to say there hasn’t been some pain,” hesays. “Employees were asked to buy into a new world and many hundreds werenot prepared to do that and left.” The changes in working practices at Halewood were achieved in 18 months,whereas in the West Midlands, similar changes were negotiated with Jaguar overthree wage agreements. The transition from Ford to Jaguar is described internally as a bloodtransfusion, replacing Ford’s corporate blue with Jaguar’s green. The process began in late 1998 after Halewood was announced as the productionsite for the new “baby” Jaguar, and the manufacturer’s managementtook over the running of the plant. Within a year, the Escort became Ford’s most improved product in Europe.Halewood employees began working alongside Jaguar engineers in the WestMidlands to prepare the X-Type for production. In the old days, the first time employees were familiarised with a new modelwas three months before “job one” – when the plant begins producingfor customers. “Nine times out of 10, it didn’t work,” says Round. The longer lead-in time allowed shopfloor workers to help decide how thevehicle could be built most efficiently. There is an immense amount ofexperience and skills from the Ford days and that, coupled with Jaguarengineering expertise, ensures the car is easy and safe to build,” saysRound. A seven-strong core training team was set up to deal with all aspects oftraining at Halewood. Weekly training meetings were attended by Hudson’s deputyand a training team member went to any launch planning meetings where therewere implications for training. Each member of the core team was given specificareas of responsibility within the plant and liaised regularly with theiropposite number in the West Midlands. To meet the new requirements of Jaguar, management concentrated on threeareas: quality, centres of excellence and culture change. To improve quality,the workforce had to adopt the standards that were already established in thecompany’s existing plants. As well as making individuals more responsible for the standard of theirwork, they were reorganised into groups of six or seven, half their formersize. Empowered”We have empowered the group leaders to deal directly with theengineers and the suppliers,” says Round. Almost every employee visited Jaguar’s other plants and around 500 spentthree months there absorbing its working techniques and culture as well asdeveloping efficient processes for building the new cars. Some went as”product coaches” so they could pass these on to the Halewood workforce.The centres of excellence were set up to introduce new working practices ina gradual, controlled manner because it was felt that establishing uniformperformance standards at a plant the size of Halewood was simply too vast atask to tackle all at once. Round says, “Areas of the plant were set up so people could actuallysee what was going to be expected of them. In any change situation, it’simportant to show people at the earliest opportunity the new state you aretrying to get to.” Senn-Delaney Leadership, an international consultancy, masterminded theshift in culture that was needed. John Clayton, European managing director,says his initial impression was of a “dark, dirty, loud andnegative-thinking place in all directions”. He adds, “Different areas distrusted each other and people did not wantto be working there. “We did focus groups, primarily with non-management people. That gaveus clarity in what was causing it to be such an unhealthy culture. So much ofit was to do with history with everybody looking through old filters.” Three-day workshops were run for management and union leaders and then atwo-day version was rolled out to the rest of the workforce. Clayton says, “We don’t consider ourselves trainers. The workshop hasan experiential format with activities designed to catch yourself beingyourself.” The next step was to focus on how behaviour needed to change to create ahigh-performance environment with teamwork, mutual respect and accountabilityamong the areas covered. Clayton attributes much of the success of theworkshops to operations manager Hudson’s willingness to discuss these ideaswith each group. “He was scheduled to be there for half an hour andsometimes he would be there an hour and a half later.” Ten people from across the workforce, including four who were hourly paid,were trained by the consultancy to run the workshops. “Normally, we go for people with public speaking and presentationexperience to do this,” says Clayton. “But it carried so much moreweight coming from these people. If I had done it, they would have said, ‘Whois this American guy and what does he know about working here?’.” More facilitators were trained to run another round of workshops that lookedat how the new, smaller assembly teams could put the principles of continuousimprovement into practice. “If you are working with a small team, it’s sovaluable if you’re prepared to talk to other members about what they are doingwell or how they could do things more effectively,” says Clayton. The most critical phase of the transformation was immediately after Escortproduction ceased in July 2000. With an eight-week gap before production of thenew model started, a wide-ranging training programme was adopted for most ofthe workforce. It was devised to emphasise the difference between building ahigh volume car and an upmarket one like the X-Type. Nearly 900 employees spent 10 days at a local college developing foundationskills such as literacy, numeracy and computing. These were all relevant tomeeting the requirements of lean manufacturing where working practices arestandardised to cut out waste and achieve consistently high quality. Round says, “If you had gone down the assembly line in the heyday ofthe Escort, you would not have seen it because there was so much stock about.The concept of lean manufacturing is actually based on doing things less; youeconomise on the lay-out and the stock you use.” A week was devoted to lean manufacturing issues led by plant supervisors andgroup leaders who had been trained to coach hourly paid employees. Time was also devoted to discussing Jaguar’s heritage and the competition itfaced around the world. An entire week was spent on 19 projects to benefit thelocal community, ranging from clearing gardens on a run-down council estate tobuilding a Chinese garden in a local primary school. Round says there were two main spin-offs from this work – underliningJaguar’s involvement and commitment to the local community and bonding the newworking teams together. It also helped break up time spent in the classroom. “We were consciousof the fact we did not want to sit them down in a classroom and bombard themwith facts week after week,” he says. “We had an individual training plan for every employee group, and thatmeant a lot of juggling to fit in all the visits to colleges, visits to Jaguarand classroom teaching at Halewood.” The final phase of the training programme lasted until February whenproduction for customers began. The time was used to fine-tune the production processes and ensure that allthe theory learned in the previous months was being put into practice. Thisinvolved assessing each person’s ability to carry out specific tasks related tothe training given. Candidates who failed to achieve the minimum standard weresingled out for further training. This procedure now forms part of a twice-yearly assessment of career andtraining needs which supervisors carry out with every shopfloor operative. Halewood is currently producing 400 cars a day and is on target to reach theeventual output target of 100,000 a year. According to Round, training colleagues from the West Midlands say Halewoodalready mirrors the standards and procedures established in their plants. InJuly, the plant achieved Investors in People status. His tip for anybody else attempting such an ambitious transformation projectis to keep in mind the big picture – his team’s mission statement is to providethe workforce “with the necessary competences to safely build the bestquality vehicles in the world”. He also says it is necessary to establish what skills and qualities theemployees have got and ask whether they will be sufficient for any new demandsthey will face. “Very often, people resist change not because they don’t want to, butbecause they lack the skills and qualities that are needed,” he says. last_img read more

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January 15, 2004 On the Move

first_imgJanuary 15, 2004 On the Move January 15, 2004 On the Move On the Move Julie A. Horstkamp has recently become a shareholder at Kirk-Pinkerton, P.A., with offices at 720 S. Orange Ave., Sarasota 34236, telephone (941) 364-2400. Horstkamp concentrated her practice in commercial and residential real estate law. The Law Office of Kevin V. Canipelli has relocated to 3609 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville 32207, telephone (904) 398-2495. Canipelli practices in the areas of wills, probate of estates, personal injury, and criminal law. Paul Rampell and Guy Rabideau have formed Rampell & Rabideau, L.L.P., with offices at 50 Cocoanut Row, Suite 220, Palm Beach 33480. Jason L. Harr has become associated with Grower, Ketcham, Rutherford, Bronson, Eide & Telan, P.A., with offices at 390 N. Orange Ave., Suite 1900, Orlando 32801, telephone (407) 423-9545. Beppy Landrum has become associated with Baker & Hostetler, L.L.P., Orlando. Landrum concentrates in the areas of corporate transactions representing profit and not-for-profit corporations and foundations, partnerships, limited liability companies, and government agencies. Epstein Becker & Green announces the opening of a Miami office which will be managed by employment attorney Michael W. Casey, II. George M. Osborne has joined Englander & Fischer, P.A., with offices at 721 First Ave. N., St. Pete., 33701, telephone (727) 898-7210. Daniel B. Rosenthal has joined Quarles & Brady in Boca Raton as senior counsel. Rosenthal will be a part of the firm’s litigation group. Heather A. Bradley has become associated with Walters Levine Brown Klingensmith & Thomison, P.A. She practices in the areas of business and construction litigation. Steven K. Brumer has co-founded Online Directives, Inc., an advance directive and living will registration service, located at www.onlinedirectives.com. Daniel A. Hoffman announces the opening of Hoffman Law located at 1718 Main Street, Ste. 202, Sarasota, 34236, phone (941) 330-2400. His practice focuses on estate planning, entertainment law, and corporate services. Timothy J. Inacio, Clifton D. Gavin and Karl W. Labertew have joined Schofield & Wade, P.A., and will practice in general civil trial litigation. R. Scott Ritchie has also joined the firm and will practice in the areas of insurance defense, construction litigation, and workers’ compensation. Travis J. McMillen has become associated with Grower, Ketcham, Rutherford, Bronson, Eide & Telan, P.A., with offices at 390 N. Orange Ave., Ste. 1900, Orlando, 32801, telephone (407) 423-9545. Amie K. Riggle has become associated with Akerman Senterfitt in the Miami office. She will focus her practice on commercial litigation. Lindsay E. Raphael Cohen has become an associate with Tripp Scott. Cohen will focus her practice on property financing and transaction counsel to buyers, sellers, lenders and developers of residential and commercial real estate. Nathalie F. Scott, formerly of Fowler White Burnett P.A., has become an associate with Akerman Senterfitt in the Ft. Lauderdale office. She will focus her practice on securities litigation and regulatory proceedings. Barbara M. Brown has become associated with O’Connor & Associates, with offices located at 2240 Belleair Road, Suite 160, Clearwater, 33764, telephone (727) 539-6800. She practices in the areas of mortgage foreclosures, commercial and real estate law, estate planning, probate, and civil litigation. Belinda Barndollar Lazzara has become a partner with Meros, Smith & Olney, P.A., located at 757 Arlington Avenue N, St. Petersburg, Florida, 33701, (727) 822-4929. She concentrates in the area of marital and family law. Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, announces the opening of its office in Miami. The office will be headed by David DeMaio and Michael Whelan. Attorneys Mike Davey and Kelly Cartus Hughes have joined the firm. The practice concentrates on labor and employment law. Rumberger, Kirk and Caldwell, P.A., announces the relocation of its Orlando office to downtown Orlando’s Lincoln Plaza. The firm provides litigation and counseling services and various civil practice areas. Michelle Buckalew has become associated with the law firm of Weiss Serota Helfman Pastoriza Guedes Cole & Boniske, P.A. She represents municipalities, public officials and individuals, primarily in government related litigation. Jennifer Ford Knopf, Shelli Willis de Roos and Carrie Eisnaugle have become associated with Holland & Knight in the Orlando office. Knopf concentrates in labor and employment law. Eisnaugle and de Roos concentrate in business law. Claude R. Moulton, P.A., announces the relocation of its offices to 2014 N. Laura St., Jacksonville, 32206, telephone (904) 632-0120, and to 5532 N.W. 43 St., Ste. A, Gainesville 32653, telephone (352) 240- 3208. The firm concentrates in the areas of real estate and business law. Fowler White Boggs Banker announces that David L. Bresler has been named office managing shareholder of the firm’s St. Pete. office, Robert J. Stommel has been named office managing shareholder of the firm’s Naples office, and Mitchell I. Horowitz has been named statewide corporate practice group leader. Robert Allen Law, formerly Allen & Galego, announces that Charles Lea Hume, formerly of Baker & McKenzie, has joined the firm as a shareholder and will practice in the areas of commercial and corporate law; John Mischel has become a shareholder and will continue to practice in the areas of tax and corporate law; and Umberto Bonavita, formerly with Weil & Gotchal, has joined the firm as an associate and will practice in the areas of commercial and corporate law. Offices are located at 601 Brickell Key Dr., Suite 805, Miami 33131, telephone (305) 372-3300. Harvey Hyman, previously with Miami-Dade State Attorney, and the Hillsborough County Public Defender, announces the opening of his law firm, Harvey Stuart Hyman, Criminal Trial Attorney. He will concentrate in state criminal cases.last_img read more

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New ways to add value for your membership

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » I’m kind of an app freak. Well, really, I am a rebate, savings, make some money on the side app freak. I love them. My obsession began a few years ago when I was trying to do a “fun apps to help save you $$$” newsletter article. I downloaded, tested them, hated some, loved others. I scanned bar codes, receipts, clicked through to sites from the apps to earn some percentage of my purchases. Saw some become obsolete or consolidated and of course new improved, more innovative, easier to use ones crop up. Years later I still love them. I have my three favs currently and….more importantly….my kids LOVE THEM!Ok. So, moms and dads out there… this blog’s for you. “Mom, can I have $$? I’m going to the mall.”“Mom, this month’s Ipsy is on fire. Can I subscribe monthly for only $12 with your credit card?”“Mom, this bag of 35 ring pops that I absolutely must have is only $7. Can I buy it? (meaning – I’m putting it in your Target cart.)last_img read more

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ACC cancels class Monday and Tuesday to prevent the spread of Coronavirus

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisALPENA, Mich. —  All Alpena Community College classes will be cancelled Monday and Tuesday, March 16 and 17.Faculty, however, should report to their offices on Monday at 9 a.m. A department chair meeting will be held at the same time in room BTC 126. The college is instructing students, faculty, and staff to monitor their ACC email accounts, the ACC COVID-19 website, and school messenger for more information regarding when classes will resume, and any other information that will be distributed in response to Coronavirus.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThis Tags: ACC, alpena community college, coronavirusContinue ReadingPrevious APS responds to Coronavirus outbreakNext MDHHS announces additional cases of COVID-19last_img read more

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Princess Cruises homeports in Santa Clarita

first_imgSANTA CLARITA – There’s a mini-city within the walls of Santa Clarita’s fastest-growing business. Princess Cruises, based well inland yet serving up luxury on the high seas, has departments ranging from entertainment to interior design, food and beverage to distribution. “We have this incredible array of professions here,” spokeswoman Julie Benson said. Among 1,800 employees housed in seven buildings in Valencia, there are lawyers and accountants, retail buyers, dancers, art and jewelry experts, doctors, nurses, photographers and videographers. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREPettersson scores another winner, Canucks beat KingsOn a recent workday, a team of executives gathered in the conference room to strategize about the faux snow that will fall on ships this holiday season. “One day we meet about snow; one day we talk about ship launches,” Benson said. “It’s all planned from here, along with everything that goes on aboard our ships.” A familiar face at the Princess Cruises’ Town Center Drive headquarters is company ambassador Gavin MacLeod, the actor who portrayed Capt. Merrill Stubing on TV’s “The Love Boat.” The Saturday night iconic romantic comedy was set aboard the Pacific Princess, one of the company’s first ships, which has since been sold to an Italian cruise company. While most of the 249 episodes of “The Love Boat” were filmed on Hollywood soundstages, the cast spent six weeks each season on the high seas. And MacLeod loved it. Location shots for the first several seasons were filmed in Mexican ports. But toward the end of the show’s nine-year run, Capt. Stubing, Doc (Bernie Kopell), Isaac (Ted Lange), Julie (Lauren Tewes, who left the show in 1984), Gopher (Fred Grandy, who later was a congressman from Iowa) and the captain’s daughter, Vicki (Jill Whelan), sailed to Europe, Russia and China. Soon after the show ended in 1986 – with the captain’s marriage to a character portrayed by Marion Ross of “Happy Days” fame – MacLeod and his real-life wife, Patti, were vacationing in Cape Cod. He got a call from the cruise line’s public-relations department and began a second career as Princess company ambassador. One duty was taking the final voyage of the Pacific Princess before it was sold, a journey that drew travelers with stories to tell. “So many people wanted to be on it – people who met on the ship and got married,” he said. Over the years, he has taped commercials for Princess, performed the play “Love Letters” aboard with his wife and – last Mother’s Day – christened the Emerald Princess in Greece with Ross as a guest. “I’ve seen Princess evolve from a company with two little ships,” he said. “It’s been great for me because it’s so wonderful to represent a business that makes people happy, that gives them things to talk about, expands their horizons.” Established in 1965, Princess Cruises was lured from Century City to Santa Clarita in 1998 with a 15-year guarantee there would be no business tax. For the past two years, Santa Clarita has been named one of Southern California’s most business-friendly cities by the Los Angeles Economic Development Corp., in large part because there is no business-license fee. Operations began with customer service. Hundreds of employees work the phones, booking cruises and customers’ related airline and hotel reservations. This year, Princess saw the largest gain in employment – 250 new jobs – of any company in Santa Clarita, according to a survey by Santa Barbara-based The California Economic Forecast. Princess is the area’s largest private employer. The headquarters, along pedestrian-oriented Town Center Drive that feeds the adjacent mall, helped establish a job base for a surrounding collection of apartments and condominiums, creating a downtown feeling in the ultimate suburb. Princess has since sprawled into three more Town Center buildings, including one that, since 2004, has housed its sister Cunard. In 1999, the company ran five ships; today, including Cunard’s luxury liners, there are 18. Cunard, the company’s high-end brand, operates the Queen Mary 2 and the Queen Elizabeth 2, and on Friday it will launch the Queen Victoria. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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