Special celebration at Red Hughs presentation dinner dance – Picture Special

first_imgRed Hughs held their annual dinner dance in the Finn Suite of the Jacksons Hotel on Saturday, March 9th. A huge crowd turned out to celebrate thier senior men receiving both their Donegal Junior Championship and Ulster Junior Club Championship medals.Presentations were also made to the minor ladies team, who received their Division 3 Championship medals on the night along with all other individual club awards. Pictures of the thrilling night can be seen below…Donegal Ladies Captain Karen Guithre who was a special guest at the Red Hughes Dinner dance in Jacksons Hotel presents minor ladies most dedicated palyers to Ciara Gallagher and Kate Carlin .Photo By Gerard McHughRed Hughs Ladies Captain Elaine Melaugh makes a special presentation to Roisin Kennedy in memory of her Husband Gary on belhalf of the Red Hughs Ladies team at the Red Hughs Dinner dance on Saturday night in Jacksons Hotel .Photo by Gerard McHughDonegal Ladies Captain Karen Guithre who was a special guest at the Red Hughes Dinner dance in Jacksons Hotel presents Orla McElchar and Amy Callaghan with joint minor player of the year awards .Photo By Gerard McHughRed Hughs minor team pictured with their management team at the Clubs dinner dance held in Jacksons .Photo by Gerard McHughRed hughs minor team captains make special presentations to their management team Gerard McColgan ,Shauna Carlin ,Elaine Melaugh and Ronan Gallen.Photo by Gerard McHughDonegal Ladies Captain Karen Guithre who was a special guest at the Red Hughes Dinner dance in Jacksons Hotel presents Olivia Dullaghan and Dawn Hyndman with Red Hughs ladies most dedicated player of the year awards .Photo By Gerard McHughDonegal Ladies Captain Karen Guithre who was a special guest at the Red Hughes Dinner dance in Jacksons Hotel presents Elaine Melaugh with Red Hughs Ladies Senior Player of the year .Photo By Gerard McHughDonegal Ladies Captain Karen Guithre who was a special guest at the Red Hughes Dinner dance in Jacksons Hotel presents Nicola Callaghan with Senior Payer of the year .Photo By Gerard McHughBrianna McConnell and Elaine Melaugh make special presentations to Gerard McColgan ,Stephen Gallagher ,Shauna Carlin and Charlie Doherty on behalf of the Red Hughs Ladies team at their Dinner Dance on Saturday night in Jacksons Hotel.Photo by Gerard McHughKathy Kelly of Red Hughs makes a special presentation to Donegal Ladies captain Karen Guithre who was a special guest at Red Hughs dinnner dance held in Jacksons Hotel on Saturday night.Photo by Gerard McHughDonegal County Chairman Mick McGrath who was a special guest at the Red Hughs Dinner dance on Saturday night in Jacksons Hotel presents Adrian Gallen with Red Hughs most Improved Minor team player to Adrian Gallen .Included in the photo are Ronan Gallen and PJ Gallagher .Photo by Gerard McHughBrianna McConnell and Elaine Melaugh make special presentations to Marie McColgan and Kathy Kelly on behalf of the Red Hughs Ladies team at their Dinner Dance on Saturday night in Jacksons Hotel.Photo by Gerard McHughGerard McColgan makes a special presentation to Elaine Melaugh,Christina McMenamin ,Shauna Carlin and Kate Browne who have perresented Red Hughs Ladies foe the past ten years .Photo by Gerard McHughDonegal County Chairman Mick McGrath who was a special guest at the Red Hughs Dinner dance on Saturday night in Jacksons Hotel presents Tim Callaghan with Red Hughs joint Reserve player of the year award .Included in the photo are Thomas Devine ,John Creane and Damien Wilson .Photo by Gerard McHughDonegal County Chairman Mick McGrath who was a special guest at the Red Hughs Dinner dance on Saturday night in Jacksons Hotel presents Adrian Gallen with Red Hughs Minor Player of the year to Dara McMenamin .Included in the photo are Ronan Gallen and PJ Gallagher .Photo by Gerard McHughDonegal County Chairman Mick McGrath who was a special guest at the Red Hughs Dinner dance on Saturday night in Jacksons Hotel presents Darren McCreary with Red Hughs joint Reserve player of the year award .Included in the photo are Thomas Devine ,John Creane and Damien Wilson .Photo by Gerard McHughDonegal County Chairman Mick McGrath who was a special guest at the Red Hughs Dinner dance on Saturday night in Jacksons Hotel presents Cathal Doherty with Red Hughs young player of the year award .Included in the photo is Damien Wilson .Photo by Gerard McHughDonegal County Chairman Mick McGrath who was a special guest at the Red Hughs Dinner dance on Saturday night in Jacksons Hotel presents Peadar McGlinchey with Red Hughs player of the year award .Included in the photo are Thomas Devine ,John Creane and Damien Wilson .Photo by Gerard McHughMarie McColgan makes a special presentation to Alice Doherty wife of Hall of Fame Winner Charlie at the Red Hughs Dinner dance on Saturday night in Jacksons Hotel.Photo by Gerard McHughRed Hughs Donegal and Ulster Junior champions pictured at their Dinner Dance in Jacksons Hotel on Saturday Night .Photo by Gerard McHughRed Hugh Captain Gerard Melaugh makes a special presentation to Donegal County Chairman Mick McGrath who was a special guest at the Red Hughs Dinner dance on Saturday night in Jacksons Hotel .Photo by Gerard McHughDonegal County Chairman Mick McGrath who was a special guest at the Red Hughs Dinner dance on Saturday night in Jacksons Hotel presents Charli Doherty with Red Hughs Hall of Fame of the year award .Photo by Gerard McHughDonegal County Chairman Mick McGrath who was a special guest at the Red Hughs Dinner dance on Saturday night in Jacksons Hotel presents Kathy Kelly with Red Hughs Club Person of the year .Photo by Gerard McHughSpecial celebration at Red Hughs presentation dinner dance – Picture Special was last modified: March 11th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:dinner danceRED HUGHS.last_img read more

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Cosmology Still in the Dark

first_imgWith so many huge gaps in materialist cosmology, a revolution may be brewing, as seen in the kinds of questions being asked.Early Maturity: Rapid Formation of Complex Structures Too Soon After the Big BangDiscovered: fast-growing galaxies from early universe (Carnegie Science): The conundrum of early maturity in the universe continues with this announcement of “a mysterious population of surprisingly massive galaxies” which, “although extremely old—formed less than a billion years after the Big Bang” yet “creates stars more than a hundred times faster than our own Milky Way.” Astronomers even believe they observed two galaxies in the act of merging, meaning they must have already formed prior to the merger.Milky Way-like Galaxies in Early Universe Embedded in ‘Super Halos’ (National Radio Astronomy Observatory): Like Carnegie, NRAO adds to the early-maturity conundrum, saying that “astronomers have directly observed a pair of Milky Way-like galaxies seen when the universe was only eight percent of its current age.” They also detected large halos of hydrogen gas extending far out beyond the galaxies.The new … data show that these young galaxies are already rotating, which is one of the hallmarks of the massive spiral galaxies we see in the universe today. The ALMA [radio telescope array] observations further reveal that both galaxies are forming stars at moderately high rates: more than 100 solar masses per year in one galaxy and about 25 solar masses per year in the other.Strongly baryon-dominated disk galaxies at the peak of galaxy formation ten billion years ago (Nature): This is a technical article about evidence for more rapid formation of galaxies in the early universe. Skeptics may notice that the interpretation assumes “cold dark matter cosmology.”Dark Matter: Evidence of Anisotropy in the UnknownDoes dark matter annihilate quicker in the Milky Way? (Science Daily): We’re supposed to be living in a ‘typical’ galaxy, but this article says “dark matter may be annihilating much more rapidly in the Milky Way, than in smaller or larger galaxies and the early Universe.” But how can anyone make claims about “a non-luminous and exotic form of matter that we know little about”? And how does mysterious unknown stuff get annihilated? If researchers making these claims are right, “their theory would explain why the Milky Way appears to be special.” Interesting admission: the Milky Way appears to be special.Dark Energy: Do Cosmologists Even Need It?New approach to dark energy might explain our cooling universe (New Scientist): Here’s more indication that cosmologists are clueless about the “mysterious unknown stuff” they said they need to keep their models working against anomalous observations. Anil Ananthaswamy personifies particles when he says, “We thought dark energy was behind the accelerated expansion of the universe to its cold, dark end state, but it might be a supporting actor in a quantum plot.” Further reading shows that cosmologists don’t know which way is up, down, forward or backward when trying to link cosmology to thermodynamics. They appear determined to escape the fine-tuning of the universe and what that implies.Can we ditch dark energy by better understanding general relativity? (The Conversation): Admitting that “Dark energy and dark matter are theoretical inventions that explain observations we cannot otherwise understand,” David Wiltshire and Alan Coley wonder if we even need them. “A renewed suggestion that dark energy may not be real — dispensing with 70% of the stuff in the universe — has reignited a longstanding debate.” Their article includes historical background on the inventions of dark matter and energy, and what the “standard model” of cosmology is (and why it is set for a scientific revolution).Need for New Physics?Physicists bring together detector and accelerator to explore ‘new physics’ beyond the Standard Model (Phys.org): Conditions in cosmology are so bad, some are seriously thinking of overturning the hard science of physics for new theories. What’s called the ‘Standard Model’ today is unlikely to be called standard much longer. But can a particle accelerator in Japan substitute for rational philosophy?Escape from RealityIf We Live in a Multiverse, Where Are These Worlds Hiding? (Live Science): Mindy Weisberger, still entranced by Future Con, leaps from irrationality to self-refutation by seriously considering that she lives in the Matrix.Is life more likely than black holes to be an adaptation for universe replication? (Phys.org): Sarah Cox is so drunk on Darwine, she thinks the multiverse created our universe by natural selection. This is Darwinian thinking completely out of control. Blame Dr. Michael Price who gave her the idea of “cosmic natural selection” (CNS), the biggest extrapolation of Darwin’s Biological Natural Selection (BNS) ever proposed. CNS selected humans instead of black holes, he argues:“I also suggest that more generally, CNS may be the ultimate primary cause of cosmological order, just as BNS is the ultimate primary cause of biological order. In other words, BNS and CNS may together be ultimately responsible for much of the order that we observe in the universe. Without this order there would be no entropy because nothing would decay to a less-ordered state and therefore no arrow of time.“In sum, the process of selection may be far more fundamental to explaining the nature of our universe than is generally supposed.“We may need a new award, Stupid Evolution Quote of the Billion Years. Darwin has not only given us the Stuff Happens Law; he bequeathed the Cosmic Stuff Happens Law to his loyal, inebriated followers.OK, OK. Please come back to reality. There. Whew! That was a bad dream.These guys were crazy a decade ago. No, two decades ago; five decades ago. Now they are so wrong, they’re not even wrong. We need a new word to describe how off their rockers these secular materialists are. Bob Berman remarked 13 years ago,Unfortunately, cosmologists are starting to resemble naked emperors parading before the mass media.  Hey, we love you, but you have no clue about the universe’s true origin or fate, and little knowledge of its composition.  Yet each pronouncement is delivered with pomp and flair.  Maybe you need a serious “time out.”Time out is too lenient now. Anybody want to trust these people? Hugh Ross followers, what about you? You think these guys are more trustworthy than the Bible, so that we have to adjust the straightforward words of God to fit their ideas? We rest our case.(Visited 622 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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What’s the Environmentally Friendliest Way to Shop?

first_imgIs cyber-shopping terrible for the environment?  Some say yes, with all those trucks heading out into suburbia to deliver your latest gadget, fashion garment, or book. But online retailers insist it is the greener delivery route—much better than you driving to the store. So, who is right? And are there even better ways?RELATED ARTICLESAs Electric Cars Stall, A Move to Greener Trucks and BusesAre Traffic-Clogged Cities Ready for Congestion Pricing?Beyond Sprawl: The Solar Suburbs of the FutureDesigning the Cities of the Future This really does matter for. Online shopping makes up one in seven retail purchases worldwide. Its value in 2019 will be a staggering $3.5 trillion, a figure that is rising by more than a fifth every year. How much of the total carbon footprint of what you buy is attributable to delivery varies hugely. But wherever your latest purchase comes from—whether a Chinese factory or a field in your home state—transport from the store or warehouse to your home likely dominates the delivery footprint, says Alan McKinnon, a professor of logistics at the Kühne Logistics University in Hamburg, Germany, and author of a new book Decarbonizing Logistics. What logistics folks call the “last mile” is usually the most energy-intensive stage, McKinnon and colleague Julia Edwards have pointed out, “and typically generates more CO2 emissions than all the upstream logistical activities.”  It is also where the difference between online and in-store shopping is greatest— nd McKinnon says that most of the time, delivery is best. A typical home delivery round of online purchases in Britain consists of 120 drops on a 50-mile (80 kilometer) round. That round produces some 50 pounds (20 kilograms) of CO2, or just over 6 ounces (170 grams) per individual delivery. If you went to the store, the typical drive would be around 13 miles (21 kilometers) there and back, which would generate 24 times more CO2.  So you’d have to pick up 24 items to break even, he says. Theory vs. real world That’s the theory. In the real world, the difference is much less, says manufacturing technology specialist Dimitri Weideli, who did an environmental analysis of online shopping while a research associate at MIT in 2013. For instance, 12% to 60% of home deliveries have been reported to fail first time. Either the van has to make a second and even third run, or customers end up driving to an out-of-town warehouse to pick up the product. Also, typically, one-fifth of products are returned, for whatever reason. Every false move increases the carbon footprint. Just as bad, our growing love of speed deliveries almost triples the footprint of online delivery, says Weideli. That is because your supplier no longer has the flexibility to bundle multiple orders into a single delivery, and because it sends out vans less full and to travel farther per delivery than they would if you were willing to wait a bit longer for your purchase to arrive. Weidel says such “impatient” cyber-shoppers have the worst carbon footprint of all. But even allowing for them, in general, whether buying laptops or Barbie dolls or T-shirts, he wrote in an analysis he did as a research associate at the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics in 2013, “online shopping is the most environmentally friendly option.” Of course, this assumes the comparison is with conventional shoppers who make special trips to the store for single purchases. Many don’t do that. We walk, bike, or take the bus. Or buy many items on a single shopping trip. In a bus ride, you share the emissions. On a typically half-empty bus, your share may still be greater than the emissions for a home delivery—seven times more if you are only buying one item, says Patricia van Loon, based on her research at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland. But since the bus would have been on the route regardless, you haven’t added to the actual emissions. EVs, drones, and robots If we can shop better, can online retailers deliver better too? That last mile is still a source of great (and costly) inefficiency for them, say logistics analysts. It’s where both dollars and carbon emissions can be saved. So they are trying. Amazon wants half its shipments to be “net zero carbon” by 2030. But how? Electric vehicles are one possibility. With no tailpipe emissions, they reduce transport’s contribution to urban smog. But their carbon footprint depends on how their electricity is generated. Right now, an electric vehicle is a lot greener in Vermont than in coal-burning West Virginia. How about drones? They would mostly deliver one package at a time. But even flitting back and forth from the depot, drones could sometimes still reduce carbon emissions relative to delivery trucks, according to Anne Goodchild of the University of Washington. They are likely to work best with light, urgent deliveries, such as medicines, food or mail, and in confined high-demand areas such as university campuses. But staying aloft for long with a heavy load is energy-intensive. Drones could be combined with trucks that drive to local transport nodes, and then hand over to drones for the last mile. Or perhaps ground-based robots? This year, both FedEx and Amazon announced plans to deploy these smart, autonomous hampers-on-wheels along our sidewalks, dodging pedestrians and crossing at the lights. Lowe’s already has plans to deploy with FedEx, and FedEx says it is talking to Pizza Hut and Walmart about doing their deliveries as well. Low-tech options Some say low-tech is still the best route to low carbon. Many European cities have companies such as Deliveroo using bicycle couriers for fast, zero-emission meal deliveries from local restaurants. The system could be extended for other goods. Ford recently developed software that could summon bike couriers to take parcels in a suburban London neighborhood the last mile from truck to front door.  Lockers in shopping malls also get around the last mile problem for online retailers. Customers are given a code and pick up their own package. But if you drive there, the carbon gain is lost. The new kid on the block is crowd-shipping—hitchhiking for parcels. Start-ups like Roadie promise to “connect people who have stuff with driver already heading that way.” Drivers make bids to deliver. Right now in some places, half of all crowd-shipping trips are made specially for the delivery, while another third take long detours. So the potential carbon saving disappears. But the more people join in, the more efficient it could be. The bottom line The bottom line? Online shopping can be greener than driving to the store. Novel last-mile alternatives to conventional delivery trucks stand to make it even more environmentally friendly. But the devil is in the details. If we bundle our orders, and avoid the speedy delivery option, we boost the environmentally friendly quotient. (Imagine if we were offered a “green shipping” button when choosing dispatch options?) Other tips for reducing delivery’s environmental impact: Do be in when the courier calls. Don’t buy on a whim and then take up the “free return” option. Oh, and don’t binge on stuff. Some say the real danger from online shopping is it encourages us to buy stuff we wouldn’t otherwise. The purchase that doesn’t happen has the lowest delivery carbon footprint of all. Fred Pearce is a British environmental journalist and author. This post originally appeared at Ensia. For more information, see Decarbonizing E-Commerce: A Path to Low-Carbon Shipping.last_img read more

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