On our way rejoicing

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL [Diocese of Dallas] Whether reciting the liturgy in Igbo, sharing the chalice with the homeless or discovering the Canterbury Trail, all illustrate the rich vibrancy of the Dallas diocese where 11,300 believers sit in the pews each Sunday to worship.Church planting, urban renewal, population growth and renewed excitement toward all things Anglican have buoyed the 69 congregations in the diocese and kept parishes and missions growing or stable. This is an important feat, particularly during a time of transition as leaders search to replace recently retired Bishop James M. Stanton.While no one thing is credited with keeping the diocese robust, strategic church planting is its lifeblood. New churches are being created in rural outposts, the inner city, and in the suburbs.“Culture changes, neighborhoods change and so there is always a need for new church plants,” said The Rev. Brendan Kimbrough, who is launching a new church in Collin County. “If we want to reach people through Christ, the most effective way is through church planting.”Kimbrough speaks from experience. He began sowing the seeds of St. Timothy’s nearly two years ago in effort to make an Episcopal Church accessible to residents in the towns of Murphy, Wylie and Sachse.After two years of meeting residents and holding Bible study in his home, Kimbrough is officially launching St. Timothy’s in August in the Murphy Activity Center. “It’s a perfect space, and will allow us to have full worship, a nursery, children’s Sunday school, a hospitality area and plenty of parking.”Establishing new churches isn’t easy and requires substantial support from the diocese in both funding and management, said Canon Victoria Heard, missioner for church planting.Starting from scratch is hard work for the priest who has to parachute into a new community with little more than a dream and a prayer. Heard points to the Rev. Michael Gilton, as a successful planter who started St. Paul’s in Prosper, which now has 130 in average Sunday attendance.“Father Gilton did most things right,” Heard said. “He moved to Prosper, where his first act was to become a crossing guard at a school, which helped get him connected to the community. Then he joined the Rotary Club. You really have to be visible as a church planter because you don’t have a pretty building. You just have yourself, Jesus Christ and a vision of what could be.”While many new congregations are built chasing suburban growth, inner city growth is more complex. In Dallas, the diocese’ largest parish is undergoing a massive construction project, while just a few miles away, a parish for the homeless continues to grow in both membership and mission. And in the Oak Cliff neighborhood, urban renewal has inspired the reconfiguration of three parishes.At the Church of the Incarnation, in Dallas’ Uptown neighborhood, members raised $26 million for a construction project that will double the church’s footprint, and better meet the needs of a rapidly growing congregation that already numbers 1,350.“We have been forced into it,” Bishop Tony Burton said. “We don’t have room to start another Sunday school class. People keep coming and we don’t have the space. We had to build. We want to fulfill the mission of the church to worship God in the great tradition, make disciples, serve the poor and raise up leaders…. .”The construction is expected to be completed next year, and will include a new worship space for the contemporary service, a new welcome center and two new educational buildings.The growth is in part due to more families moving to the Uptown area, and the easy access provided by Interstate 75 that makes the location convenient for those outside the immediate neighborhood, Burton said.A few miles away, an outdoor church servicing the homeless continues to flourish and expand its mission of helping others. The Gathering, which provides an extended Eucharist with lunch in a downtown park, was started in 2012 and averages 100 worshippers on Sunday.“It’s a parish community without walls,” said Tom Hauser, executive director of The Gathering. “We have liturgy, we have communion, and we have a proper sermon with the appropriate liturgical colors. We are proclaiming the same gospel as the Church of the Incarnation, but at the same time we are less formal. We have to be, some of our people don’t have shoes.”Homeless members of the parish have gone on three mission trips – twice to Oklahoma to help rebuild homes that were destroyed in tornadoes and once to Camp All Saints to help get the grounds ready for summer campers.In Oklahoma, “it was the homeless helping the homeless,” said the Rev. Charlie Keen. “They worked their butts off. On the way home they talked about what a blessed experience it was and then when we got back into town, instead of taking them home I dropped them off at a park — they don’t have homes.”While The Gathering offers access to urban ministry, so do the changing demographics of older neighborhoods such as Oak Cliff. Recently, three parishes with dwindling congregations united into one parish in a neighborhood that is experiencing urban renewal.The congregations of Epiphany, St. George and St. Paul merged to form St. Augustine’s. The new parish meets in the former St. Paul church and has a new rector, the Rev. Paul Wheatley. Because all of the parishes wanted to merge, the congregation has deeper roots than a new church that may have popped up a year ago, he said.“St. Paul’s, Epiphany and St. George’s all experienced demographic shifts in their neighborhoods over the last few decades and the congregations declined as the neighborhoods around them changed,” Wheatley said. “Our opportunity is reaching out and connecting them to the wonderful resources we have such as history, maturity and diversity.”The merge created a 90-member congregation that represents the neighborhoods surrounding the church, which is diverse in age and race, and thereby attracts new members. “They show up and we have great-grandparents, grandparents, Latinos, Anglos and African Americans,” Wheatley said. “Our local churches are at their best when they represent the diversity of the neighborhoods around them.”Diversity is not only a growing theme in Oak Cliff but in other areas of the diocese where services are held in a variety of languages. Congregations include Latin American, Nigerian, Kenyan, Bhutanese, and Korean.“On any given Sunday we have services in seven languages,” Heard said. Currently I’m looking for a priest who speaks Swahili.”One such service at Emmanuel Anglican Church is in the Igbo language, one of the three major languages of Nigeria. The mission meets at St. Luke’s in Dallas and has an average of 115 worshipers on Sunday, said the Rev. Daniel Ofoegbu.The mission competes with evangelical churches for newly transplanted Nigerians. “One of the challenges is that in Africa, the Episcopal Church is known as the Anglican Church, so it does not translate for them when they come to America and they end up at an evangelical church,” Ofoegbu said.Services in Spanish are also increasing in the diocese due to Dallas’ growing Hispanic population. About 90 percent come from the Roman Catholic Church and the other 10 percent come from an evangelical church, said the Rev. Tony Munoz.The main draw for Hispanics to the Episcopal Church is the liturgy, he said. “They like that we are a welcoming church, it makes them feel like they are home. They have more accessible priests, and they get excited when they find the sacrament is still here,” Munoz said. “They came from the Catholic Church where they felt like spectators, but here they get to be part of the liturgy and participate.”While Spanish-language services are a draw for Hispanics, engaging the second generation is much more difficult. “The people we reach are the parents who speak Spanish. We are trying to reach the children who speak English,” Munoz said. “Our challenge is to give them an English service with a Latino flavor.”Another stream of diocesan growth is a counterculture trend of Protestants coming into the Anglican faith, said the Rev. Joseph Hermerding, an assistant rector at Incarnation.“This movement is referred to as the Canterbury Trail. We are seeing young evangelicals looking for something more stable, more traditional, more relevant and transcendent than what they are used to,” Hermerding said. “They don’t want their pastor in jeans, sandals and a t-shirt.”Much of the attraction for the new converts is a rich, worship culture that is intellectual and takes the life of the mind very seriously, Hermerding noted.Part of the appeal is that the church is authentic and doesn’t pander for membership, he added.“We thought we would get all the yuppies from Uptown coming to our traditional service,” Hermerding said. “We get some of those, but we were surprised to also get those with tattoos and dreadlocks to high mass. We are not marketing to them. We are not trying to please them. We are trying to worship God and they are attracted to an articulate, thoughtful Christian orthodox message.”The Canterbury Trail is led by the millennial generation but is becoming a much broader movement, said the Rev. Steven Peay, associate dean at Nashotah House Theological Seminary. “It’s the new monasticism. They are looking for intentional community, they want depth, and they want something that makes a difference. People are not interested in the shallow spirituality that we’ve shoved out for years and years. They are looking to go deep.”Wheatley agreed that the Episcopal Church’s historical identity and doctrine is a strong catalyst for diocese growth and stability.“One of the strengths we have as a diocese is that Anglicanism has Catholic and Evangelical streams in it,” he said. “We have a faith that is old as the apostles and we serve a risen Lord whose Holy Spirit is always bringing renewal and life.”— Kimberly Durnan is communications director for the Diocese of Dallas.  Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab By Kimberly DurnanPosted Oct 2, 2014 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC October 3, 2014 at 8:34 pm Well done! Well documented, well organized and well illustrated. Thank you for holding up the faithful, sustained work by those in parishes of your diocese and, by extension, in the larger body of Christ’s church. We all need the hope and vision that come from sharing the ways others have overcome challenges. Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments (2) Rector Pittsburgh, PA Janet Campbell says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing October 8, 2014 at 7:48 pm A wonderful article, but “sit in the pews” suggests a passive, receiving audience, rather than a dynamic people who carry out the ministries in this article. Our liturgy is full of activity. When Episcopalians come together for worship, we gather, process, stand, sing, sit, proclaim, listen, baptize, anoint, pray, kneel, confess, share the peace, make offerings, give thanks, process to the table, eat and drink, feed one another, and are sent out to go into all the world. 11,300 people gather in their church buildings to celebrate, not “sit in the pews.” In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Don Plummer says: On our way rejoicing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York last_img read more

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Minister urged to move maternity hospital to Dooradoyle campus

first_img TAGSCllr Tomas HannonMusic Limerickuniversity hospital limerick WhatsApp Twitter Management at most overcrowded and most COVID-hit hospital apologise to patients ‘waiting over 100 hours’ for a bed Numbers of Limerick hospital group staff sidelined by COVID-19 reduces by 162 in past 7 days Email 64 patients waiting for beds in UHL Linkedin Print Facebookcenter_img Previous articleCampaign launched in blaze of turf sodsNext articleWeekend GAA betting tips with Paddy Power Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 53 patients waiting for beds at UHL Updated statement on service disruptions UL Hospitals Group NewsLocal NewsMinister urged to move maternity hospital to Dooradoyle campusBy Alan Jacques – March 27, 2014 827 Labour councillor Tomas HannonHEALTH Minister James Reilly has been asked to speed up the relocation of the regional maternity hospital from its current site on Limerick’s Ennis Road to the University Hospital Limerick (UHL) campus in Dooradoyle.Labour Party City Councillor Tom Hannon submitted a motion at County Hall this Monday calling for the Maternity Hospital to be relocated at Dooradoyle as a matter of priority in order to provide “safer care for the mothers of the mid-west region”.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up As the largest of the country’s 19 maternity units, the Ennis Road hospital delivers between 4,500 and 5,000 babies annually — around seven per cent of the national total.Cllr Hannon pointed out that it has neither an intensive care unit, a high dependency unit or proper X-ray facilities.“It is the only maternity unit in the country without a blood bank on site. Given the frequency of serious haemorrhages in obstetric care, this represents a hazard to patient safety. Critically-ill mothers have to be shipped regularly by emergency ambulance across town to avail of these facilities in Dooradoyle — and are consequently separated from their newborn babies, possibly for several days,” claimed Cllr Hannon.“A site has been set aside in Dooradoyle but it awaits the go-ahead and funding from central government and the HSE. In addition to the lack of critical care facilities, the standard of accommodation for mothers is from a different age when there was not the same knowledge and concern about hospital-acquired infections,” he added.Claiming that four mothers are obliged to share a single shower and toilet in a public post-natal ward, he warned of the “considerable risk of transmission of infection”, leaving aside the obvious concerns about privacy and comfort.“The medical staff who provide maternity services are spread very thinly over numerous sites in the region. This makes it very difficult to operate the service efficiently and safely,” he said.He calculated that an investment of €150 million to build a new maternity hospital on the main site would create between 1000 and 1500 construction jobs and could reduce the government deficit by up to €30 million  a year.“If the new maternity hospital included beds and facilities for elective and emergency gynaecology services, it would alleviate the persistent problem of over-crowding at UHL. The money for the new maternity hospital could be raised through a specially-marketed offering of the National Solidarity Bonds,” he suggesteded.Seconding the motion, Cllr Brigid Teefy (IND) said extra facilities have been “very badly needed” at the maternity for years.Cllr James Collins (FF) also supported the motion and said he believed centralising the maternity at UHL made sense. Advertisement Celebrating a ground breaking year in music from Limericklast_img read more

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Council respond to dust complaints in Raheen and Mungret

first_imgLinkedin HSE Mid West Community Healthcare and UL Hospitals Group urges public to avoid household visits and social gatherings for St Patrick’s Day Protests planned after Irish Cement incinerator gets go-ahead Call for ban on use of helium balloons in Limerick TAGSEnvironmental Protection Agency (EPA)HSE Mid WestIrish CementLimerick City and Council CouncilMungretRaheen Minister asked to review need for more incinerators in Limerick WhatsApp Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Emailcenter_img Previous articleRecruitment Open Day For Project Engineering TechniciansNext articleWin cinema tickets Editor NewsCommunityHealthCouncil respond to dust complaints in Raheen and MungretBy Editor – April 28, 2017 1161 The Irish Cement Factory in Limerick.Limerick City and County Council has responded to complaints about dust deposition made by residents in Mungret and Raheen. The complaints described thick dust deposited on cars, roofs and windows, solar panels and garden furniture, with the belief being that the source of the dust was likely to be the nearby Irish Cement plant.In a joint statement with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Health Service Executive (HSE) the council said that the, “samples of dust from cars belonging to a number of complainants have been analysed and compared to samples of materials from the Irish Cement facility.  The results indicate that the dust deposits contained Irish cement plant material along with ambient dusts due to the extended dry weather.”Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The EPA and Limerick City and County Council have assessed the extent to which other potential sources of dust may exist in the area.  To date, no such source has been identified as being a likely contributor to the issue.As a result the EPA has initiated a formal Compliance Investigation into the management and control of dust at the Irish Cement facility.  As part of this investigation, the company is conducting a detailed inspection of the material and product handling infrastructure and processes over the entire site to identify any potential defects.  Irish Cement are to conclude the review in a month and to report back regularly to the EPA as it progresses.  Any defects or failures are to be rectified immediately on discovery.It went on to say that, “health advice based on sampling results to date and surveillance of healthcare usage confirms that exposure to the dust may cause respiratory irritation but does not pose a serious health risk in the short term.”In relation to possible health implications, HSE Mid-West liaised with general practitioners and the local hospital emergency department.  To date, no unusual patterns of ill health have been identified.  HSE Mid-West will continue to monitor the situation in the coming weeks.Reacting to this investigation, Irish Cement said that it “apologises for any inconvenience caused to its neighbours and commits to continuing to work with all the agencies and local communities to rectifying the situation.”It also stated that it had taken a number of “proactive steps locally”and had “made arrangements for car washes and cleaning of affected properties.”The EPA and Limerick City and County Council are establishing a network of dust monitoring units in four locations in Limerick city that will provide information on dust levels for assessment against air quality standards and will support ongoing health risk assessment by the HSE.  The first of these units has been located in the Mungret/ Raheen area, and the remaining units should be in place by the 5th May.  Results obtained and an assessment of any potential for adverse health impacts will be published in subsequent updates in this series.Limerick City and County Council intends that the monitoring network will be upgraded to provide online real-time air quality information for Limerick.Members of the public are encouraged to contact the EPA in the event of experiencing dust or other nuisance from EPA licensed facilities, either through the EPA website (https://lema.epa.ie/complaints) or at 053-916 0600 (24 hours). Twitter Analog Devices donation of two playing pitches to enhance community living Print Advertisement Protest planned in Limerick after Irish Cement given green light to burn alternative fuelslast_img read more

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PEO fashion show offers something for everyone

first_imgLatest Stories You Might Like CHHS senior earns 2014 Jean Lake art scholarship Jessica Large received the 2014 Jean Lake Scholarship. The CHHS seniors’ artwork is on display at the Johnson Center for… read more The P.E.O. Spring Fashion Show is set for Saturday and it’s a fashion show for everyone – women, children and, this year, men.The annual fundraiser for P.E.O. will be at 11 a.m., Saturday at the Family Life Center of Park Memorial United Methodist Church in Troy. Tickets are $10.Although it’s helpful for tickets to be purchased in advance, some tickets will be available at the door.Reservations may be made on line at [email protected] and paid for and picked up at the doorThe luncheon will feature the P.E.O.’s traditional chicken salad plate. Members of the Troy University Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity will be the serversElaine Bassett, P.E.O. member, said the fifth annual P.E.O. Spring Fashion Show will showcase fashions from shops on the square in downtown Troy and modeled by friends and neighbors.The show will feature several local celebrity models, including attorney Joel Williams and Pike County Chamber of Commerce President Kathy Sauer.“We’ll have some really great door prizes donated by local merchants,” Bassett said. “These are door prizes that anyone would like to have and are worth more than the price of admission.“We’ll also have baked goods – cakes, cookies, cheese straws—for sale and some handmade items, including jewelry. So, we encourage everyone to bring along a little extra money.”P.E.O. (Philanthropic Educational Organization) celebrates the advancement of women through education and all funds raised through the Spring Fashion show will be used to fund scholarships, grants, awards and loans for women who seek to achieve their highest aspirations.“Two local women have earned grants this year to assist them as they further their educations,” Bassett said. “We congratulate Wanda Norris and Kim Kersey as recipients of these grants. Opportunities for P.E.O. grants and scholarships are available to women in our area and we encourage women to take advantage of them.”Bassett said P.E.O. also raises funds in other ways to assist women in their endeavors to further their educations and better prepare themselves for career opportunities.The local P.E.O. Chapter has been active in for 10 years.Today, P.E.O. has grown from that tiny membership of seven to almost a quarter of a million members in chapters in the United States and Canada.The P.E.O. Sisterhood is passionate about its mission: promoting educational opportunities for women.The sisterhood proudly makes a difference in women’s lives with six philanthropies that include ownership of Cottey College, a women’s college with two-year and selected four-year programs, and five other philanthropies that provide higher educational assistance. Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Skip PEO fashion show offers something for everyone By The Penny Hoarder By Jaine Treadwell Email the author Print Articlecenter_img Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Sponsored Content Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Book Nook to reopen Published 8:42 pm Thursday, April 3, 2014 Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthRemember Them? I’m Sure Their New Net Worth Will Leave You SpeechlessbradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Smith boosts Orange with strong performance, finishes college career a winner

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ HOUSTON — Jerome Smith took the field against Minnesota for the Texas Bowl on Friday with a handful of goals, milestones and markers in mind.First and foremost, he wanted to win, but the rest were individual. He entered the game 160 yards short of a second straight 1,000-yard season. He wanted that. He watched backfield partner Prince-Tyson Gulley win the New Era Pinstripe Bowl MVP in 2012. He wanted one of his own. Running backs coach DeAndre Smith looked up the record for rushing yards in a bowl game. Jerome Smith wanted that, too.The last three, perhaps the loftier of the goals, fell short, but he got the one he wanted most. He went out a winner.“The hay is finally in the barn,” he said.Smith carried the ball 16 times for 74 yards. In his final game in a Syracuse uniform, the Orange (7-6, 4-4 Atlantic Coast) let him pound the ball. His three backups sat back as Smith ran wild during the 21-17 Texas Bowl win over Minnesota (8-5, 4-4 Big Ten).AdvertisementThis is placeholder textHe didn’t have the dominant performance he hoped for, but he scored SU’s first touchdown and displayed the solid, workmanlike running style that fans have come to expect and that he hopes will get him a spot in the NFL.“I thought it was best for me and my family,” Smith said. “I graduated, so I did my part and gave my all to Syracuse.”Smith’s decision to forgo his final year of eligibility was made earlier during the season, but he decided not to make it public because it would’ve been “selfish.”“I wanted my team to just focus on the season,” Smith said.He said leaving now was a matter of timing. He’s leaving the Orange in a good position and with the senior class that he came in with.That’s all the decision comes down to. He’s not concerned with injuries — those can happen at any level. Instead, he’s confident with the direction that SU is heading in. And without him it will be just fine.“We’e got a really good class of running backs in our backfield and I feel like I left them in good hands,” Smith said. “They’ll probably do a lot better than me.” Comments Published on December 28, 2013 at 3:01 am Contact David: [email protected] | @DBWilson2last_img read more

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