Tribute to Sardasht Osman

first_img Receive email alerts A year has passed since Sardasht Osman was murdered. A year since this 23-year-old journalist was kidnapped by gunmen outside the foreign language department at Salahaddin University in Erbil on 4 May 2010 only to be found dead four days later in Mosul with a bullet in his head. A year of freedom and impunity for his murderers.Reporters Without Borders pays tribute today to Osman, who despite his youth had already written many articles, including an op-ed piece for the Kurdistan Post at the end of 2009 entitled, “If only I were Massoud Barzani’s son-in-law.”Our thoughts are with his family, friends and colleagues on this sad anniversary. At the same time, we question the Kurdistan Regional Government’s determination to shed light on this murder and condemn the lack of transparency surrounding its investigation.The anniversary comes at a time of tension. The security forces of the two political parties that control Kurdistan’s government keep harassing journalists covering the street protests that have been taking place in the region since mid-February. Press freedom violations have increased in recent weeks. Journalists are constantly the targets of death threats, acts of intimidation, physical attacks and murder attempts. Their offices have also been attacked and ransacked. Kurdistan’s president, Massoud Barzani, appointed a special commission under interior ministry control to investigate Osman’s abduction and murder. But Osman’s family quickly challenged the commission’s independence.During a fact-finding visit to Kurdistan in July 2010, a Reporters Without Borders delegation tried to establish the status of the investigation and sought in vain to meet with members of the commission. None of the people the delegation spoke to was able or willing to name any of its members. The flagrant lack of transparency was highlighted in the report that Reporters Without Borders released on 4 November.The commission issued its initial findings on 15 October. It said in a press release that Osman’s murder had nothing to do with his activities as a journalist. It stemmed, it said, from his refusal to cooperate with Ansar Al-Islam, a radical Islamic group linked to Al-Qaeda. Hicham Mahmoud Ismail, a driver and mechanic living in Beji who had been arrested on suspicion of carrying out Osman’s abduction had confessed to transporting him from Shargat (near Tigrit) to Mosul at the group’s behest without knowing he was to be killed, the press release said.The family immediately disputed the findings. “We not only reject the results of the enquiry but we also condemn its actions and voice our anger at these attempts to portray Sardasht as a terrorist who cooperated with Ansar Al-Islam,” the family said in a statement. “Anyone who knew Sardasht or read his articles knew that he was a secular person far removed from terrorist ideology.”Ansar Al-Islam issued a statement on 23 October denying any role in his murder.So, one year after his death, his murderers are still at large. And he is not the only young journalist to have been murdered in Iraqi Kurdistan in recent years. Soran Mama Hama, who worked for Lvin Magazine and who was also 23, was gunned down at his home in Kirkuk on 21 July 2008.On 15 May, Reporters Without Borders will publish a Kurdish-language version of the Handbook for Journalists, which was produced in partnership with UNESCO. The Kurdish-language version is being brought out with help from the Aras publishing house. February 15, 2021 Find out more News News Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Iraq May 4, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Tribute to Sardasht Osman RSF_en Iraq : Wave of arrests of journalists covering protests in Iraqi Kurdistan to go furthercenter_img RSF’s 2020 Round-up: 50 journalists killed, two-thirds in countries “at peace” Three jailed reporters charged with “undermining national security” IraqMiddle East – North Africa News News IraqMiddle East – North Africa Organisation December 28, 2020 Find out more December 16, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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STEAM

first_imgIn rural Georgia counties, STEAM programs are having an impact on kids, teenagers and adults. STEAM is designed to integrate science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics subjects into various education disciplines. The goal is to teach students how to think critically and use engineering or technology in creative approaches to real-world problems while building on students’ mathematics and science base.During the month of July, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension 4-H agent Randie Gray will be teaching students about STEAM-based careers in a 4-H day camp every Wednesday in Hancock County.Working closely with children in Hancock County through the Georgia 4-H program, Gray’s spent two months selecting lesson plans that engage youth with fun, hands-on activities, from incubating chickens to making bubble gum and model airplanes with the goal of introducing them to new concepts and skills. “I think STEAM is a way to break the cycle of poverty by teaching kids skills that will help them to get 21st-century jobs,” Gray said. “I think in a small county like Hancock, there’s not a lot to do, not a lot of options for the kids compared to those who live in urban counties.” Nearly 80 youths attended last year’s camp, which was taught by 4-H team leaders and two adult volunteers.Kids teaching adultsWhile Hancock County uses STEAM to prepare today’s youth for tomorrow’s opportunities, four counties in northwest Georgia have joined forces to form the Tech Changemakers program. Created through a grant from Microsoft and the National 4-H Council, the program is designed for youth to teach digital literacy skills to adults.Stephanie Skojac, the UGA Extension 4-H agent in Murray County, partnered with the local senior center last fall to hold monthly technology classes taught by 4-H’ers. The students taught 15 adult students how to grocery shop online, use Facebook and use video-calling services like Skype and Facetime.“The adults loved it and such a high number of students came every month; it amazed me,” Skojac said. “We had T-shirts made that say 4-H Tech Changemakers and all the students are proud to wear their shirts. I’m really impressed with the program.”About 25 4-H students participated each month, and the senior center has requested the program be offered again this year.As broadband internet access continues to improve in rural communities, these adults will now be more equipped to use the resources at their disposal, Skojac said. Georgia 4-H members in Catoosa, Gordon and Whitfield counties have joined the program this year.“I think with this particular initiative, companies are realizing that it is important for our whole population to have STEAM skills, so we’re flipping the model. Instead of having adults teach youth, we’re having the youth teach older adults,” said Allie Griner, UGA Extension 4-H agent in Gordon County. “How to get an email address is a very simple concept for some of us, but for adults not used to technology it’s a huge thing to be able to do that.”A love for engineering sparked by STEAMGeorgia high school senior Madison Moore is using her experience in STEAM to educate others in Emanuel County about its value. A student at Swainsboro High School in Emanuel County, Moore has developed a love and passion for engineering through the STEAM curriculum at her school.An active 4-H member, Moore integrated both of her passions by becoming a 4-H STEAM ambassador. She attended a training camp last summer to learn what an ambassador does and how to teach children.One of the requirements for an ambassador is to complete six learning and six sharing experiences. One of her sharing experiences centered on teaching engineering-focused STEAM lessons to youth in her county. She created a STEAM club through 4-H to spread her knowledge and love of STEAM to students in elementary and middle schools. They met once a month during the past school year, and Moore taught lessons about the engineering design process, aerodynamics, inertia, and kinetic and potential energy. She also led hands-on activities like building rockets, making a volcano and launching a catapult.“I really enjoy presenting these kids with the opportunity to learn the kinds of things that I wished I could have learned when I was their age,” Moore said. “I hope to fill their minds with knowledge, which will hopefully fuel their passion for STEAM as well.”Moore plans to attend Kennesaw State University with hopes of pursuing a career as a drafter or civil engineer.“Engineering has really had a huge impact on my life. It has helped me find out who I was and become who I am now,” Moore said. “I believe that engineering and technology education is important because it impacts everyone. Everything you see around you was created by an engineer — from your cellular device to this building.”In three years of engineering education, Moore developed leadership and problem-solving skills and learned how to use power tools. Following the STEAM pathway also earned her a diploma seal for completing the Technology and Engineering pathway at Swainsboro High.“By exposing students to STEAM and giving them opportunities to explore different STEAM-related concepts, they will have a chance to develop a passion for it and hopefully decide to pursue a job in a STEAM field,” Moore said. “A curriculum that is STEAM-based has real-life situations to help the student learn.”last_img read more

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Tickets on sale now for Franklin County Chamber of Commerce ‘Women in Business Luncheon’

first_imgBrookville, In. — The Franklin County Chamber of Commerce will hold the “Women in Business Luncheon” on Wednesday, April 24 at 11:30 a.m. in the Shilling Center. Executive director Rhonda Brown says the featured speaker is the owner of the Warm Glow Candle Company, Jackie Carberry.Come celebrate Administrative Professionals Day with good food, networking and information to help prepare for a prosperous 2019.Reserved seating tickets are $20 and an RSVP is appreciated by April 17.The mailing address is:FC ChamberP.O. Box 211Brookville, In. 47012The Physical address is:18 West 10th StreetBrookville, In. 47012For more information email [email protected] or call 765-647-3177.last_img

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