McElhinney’s named ‘Store of the Year’

first_img Twitter WhatsApp By News Highland – November 7, 2011 Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Twitter Facebook 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Pinterest Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Facebook WhatsApp McElhinney’s named ‘Store of the Year’center_img 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Google+ Newsx Adverts Google+ Previous articleBIM in Donegal to offer sea safety coursesNext articleFinn Harps in real danger of going bust News Highland RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR McElhinney’s  has taken home the top award for ‘Store of the Year’ at the 2011 Retail Awards.Retail Excellence Ireland, Ireland’s largest retail industry body, presented the awards at ceremony in Galway at the weekend.The awards are the biggest event in the Irish retail industry calendar.In business in Ballybofey since 1971, McElhinney’s is one of Ireland’s largest department stores, with over 90,000 sq ft of retail space.John McElhiney says they are honoured to have recieved the award:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/johmm1pm.mp3[/podcast] Pinterestlast_img read more

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BLOG: Governor Wolf’s Week, June 5 – June 11, 2016

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter June 10, 2016 Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf The Blog,  Videos,  Weekly Update This week, Governor Wolf took the most significant step the commonwealth has taken to reform our liquor system in 80 years by signing a bipartisan, compromise liquor modernization bill. Governor Wolf’s goal has always been to modernize the sale of liquor and beer in Pennsylvania and this reform package will finally bring Pennsylvania’s wine and spirits system into the 21st century. This bill will allow grocery stores that currently sell beer to sell up to four bottles of wine, will permit restaurants and hotels to sell up to four bottles of wine for take-out, and removes Sunday restrictions and state-mandated holidays.Additionally, a new jobs announcement brought welcome news to the commonwealth. Over the past four years, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has worked with Royal Dutch Shell to finalize plans to construct an ethane cracker plant in Western Pennsylvania, and this Monday, Governor Wolf was notified that Shell has taken the final step to move ahead with this game-changing plant and create thousands of jobs in Pennsylvania.In Bethlehem and Scranton, the governor also continued to hold bipartisan roundtables to discuss local and statewide efforts to lead the nation in combating the opioid abuse and heroin use epidemic. Fighting Pennsylvania’s opioid and heroin epidemic is a top priority for the Wolf Administration and these roundtables are an opportunity to work collaboratively with the General Assembly and community leaders to ensure Pennsylvania leads the nation in the fight to combat the opioid abuse and heroin use crisis.Governor Wolf also continued to discuss the fair funding formula he signed into law last week. Prior to the signing of this bill, Pennsylvania was one of only three states in the nation without a fair funding formula. Having a formula in place will assure school districts that new funding will be distributed equitably and investments in education will no longer be determined by the influence of one legislator over another.Governor Wolf’s Week, June 5 – June 11, 2016Tuesday, 5/7/16Governor Wolf Announces Shell Cracker Plant Coming to PennsylvaniaGovernor Tom Wolf Statement on Passage of Liquor Reform BillGovernor Wolf Statement Supporting Continuing Medical Education For PrescribersGovernor Tom Wolf and First Lady Frances Wolf Invite the Public to Arts in the Garden at the Governor’s ResidenceWednesday 5/8/16Governor Wolf Signs Bill to Prevent Further Spread of Substance AbuseGovernor Wolf and Villanova Coach Jay Wright Urge Pennsylvanians to Stop Sexual Assault, Sign “It’s On Us” PledgeGovernor Wolf Signs Historic Liquor Reform BillThursday, 6/9/16BLOG: Governor Wolf and Villanova Coach Jay Wright Urge Pennsylvanians to Stop Sexual Assault (VIDEO)Governor Wolf Nominates Brig. Gen. Tony Carrelli to be Pennsylvania’s Adjutant GeneralFriday, 6/10/16In Bethlehem and Scranton, Governor Wolf Hosts Roundtables to Address Pennsylvania’s Opioid EpidemicHighlights from The Blog:BLOG: Governor Wolf Continues Fight Against Pennsylvania’s Opioid Epidemic (Round-up)BLOG: How Is Gov. Wolf Fighting Back Against the Heroin Crisis in the next Budget?BLOG: Basic Education Fair Funding Formula Signed into Law (Round-up)BLOG: Shell Cracker Plant a “Game-Changer” for Pennsylvania’s EconomyBLOG: Governor Wolf Announces Finalized Plan for Royal Dutch Shell Plant in Western PA (Round-up)BLOG: Governor Wolf Signs Historic Liquor Reform Bill (Round-Up)BLOG: Fighting Pennsylvania’s Opioid Epidemic (VIDEO)BLOG: Governor Wolf joined by Villanova Coach Jay Wright to Spread Awareness of “It’s On Us” Campaign Against Sexual Assault (Round-up)center_img BLOG: Governor Wolf’s Week, June 5 – June 11, 2016 By: The Office of Governor Tom Wolflast_img read more

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Lakers vs. Pelicans would be tantalizing playoff matchup, but New Orleans isn’t alone in race for No. 8 seed

first_imgSunday’s national TV showcase between the Lakers and Pelicans isn’t just another chance to witness Zion Williamson and LeBron James display their freakish athleticism. It’s also a potential playoff preview.Heading into the matchup, New Orleans is only 2 1/2 games back of the No. 8 seed in the Western Conference. It’s an impressive turnaround considering just two months ago the Pelicans were ahead of only the lowly Warriors in the West basement. Los Angeles is holding a comfortable 5 1/2-game lead atop the standings, setting up the rare No. 1 vs. No. 8 first-round series that would actually be highly entertaining. MORE: How Ball brothers moved away from family businessThe storylines would be plentiful: Zion vs. LeBron signifying future vs. present, Anthony Davis heading back to New Orleans after demanding a trade last season, the players dealt for Davis (Brandon Ingram, Lonzo Ball and Josh Hart) looking to prove their worth. Even if the Lakers swept the Pelicans off the floor, each game would be worth watching.But that’s jumping ahead just a bit. The Pels still need to earn a playoff berth, and while the West’s top seven seems secure, that last spot is very much up for grabs.2020 NBA playoff picture: The race for eighth(Remaining strength of schedule via Tankathon)No. 8 seed: GrizzliesRecord: 29-31Net rating: Minus-2.0Remaining games: 22Remaining strength of schedule: .543 (third-hardest in NBA)Why they will make it: Ja Morant continues his tremendous Rookie of the Year campaign (17.7 points, 7.0 assists, 3.4 rebounds per game) and guides Memphis to its first postseason appearance since the 2016-17 season. Role players like Dillon Brooks and Jonas Valanciunas provide enough support to cover for the absences of Jaren Jackson Jr. and Justise Winslow.Why they won’t make it: ​Jackson’s injury hurts more than expected, and Morant’s production and efficiency drops slightly. The schedule slows the Grizzlies down, and a rough final stretch (vs. Mavericks, at Trail Blazers, at Nuggets, vs. Thunder, vs. 76ers, at Rockets) pushes them out of the playoff picture for good.No. 9: PelicansRecord: 26-33Net rating: Minus-1.1Remaining games: 23Remaining strength of schedule: .455 (second-easiest in NBA)Why they will make it: Because Zion won’t accept anything else. It’s worth noting the small sample size, but the Pelicans hold a 13.2 net rating with him on the floor this season. They benefit from finally having their full group together and roll through a favorable schedule.Why they won’t make it: The injury bug bites New Orleans one more time before the regular season ends. Williamson plays less like basketball Incredible Hulk and more like a normal human being. The Pels lose important games in late March (vs. Spurs, at Grizzlies, vs. Kings, vs. Grizzlies).No. 10: SpursRecord: 25-33Net rating: Minus-1.4Remaining games: 24Remaining strength of schedule: .478 (seventh-easiest in NBA)Why they will make it: Gregg Popovich’s squad capitalizes on a home-heavy schedule (15 of the final 26 games in San Antonio). DeMar DeRozan and LaMarcus Aldridge offer steady scoring, and Dejounte Murray bursts onto the scene with a run of two-way excellence that propels the Spurs past their competition.Why they won’t make it: The 22-year playoff streak is over. DeRozan and Aldridge fill the box score, but the Spurs can’t stop anyone (112.5 defensive rating, seventh-worst in the league). San Antonio’s final five games (at Rockets, vs. 76ers, vs. Rockets, at Pacers, vs. Pelicans) put the nail in the coffin.No. 11: Trail BlazersRecord: 26-35Net rating: Minus-2.3Remaining games: 21Remaining strength of schedule: .464 (third-easiest in NBA)Why they will make it: CJ McCollum catches fire to ensure Damian Lillard doesn’t collapse from the weight of having the entire city of Portland on his back. The Blazers rattle off a few key wins during a soft spot in the schedule (at Hawks, at Magic, vs. Wizards, at Suns, vs. Kings, vs. Suns).Why they won’t make it: Lillard’s groin injury is worse than initially anticipated, and McCollum, Carmelo Anthony and Hassan Whiteside can’t score enough to offset the Blazers’ poor defense (113.6 defensive rating, fourth-worst in the league). Despite Terry Stotts’ best efforts, the lack of depth is too much to overcome.No. 12: KingsRecord: 25-34Net rating: Minus-1.9Remaining games: 23Remaining strength of schedule: .487 (ninth-easiest in NBA)Why they will make it: The Kings are back! Sacramento ends its 13-year playoff drought behind a resurgent De’Aaron Fox and Buddy Hield, who has been shooting an insane 47.5 percent on 3-pointers in the 15 games he has come off the bench. Hield’s acceptance of his new role motivates the rest of the Kings to follow suit under Luke Walton.Why they won’t make it: Sacramento unsurprisingly can’t find consistency through March and April. Marvin Bagley III’s injury lingers over the franchise as Luka Doncic surges into the playoffs, and questions about the roster loom large as the Kings enter the 2020 offseason.No. 13: SunsRecord: 24-37Net rating: Minus-1.0Remaining games: 21 Remaining strength of schedule: .530 (sixth-hardest in NBA)Why they will make it: Devin Booker averages 30 points over the last 20 games of the campaign. Ricky Rubio remains a steady hand at point guard, and the occasional big night from Deandre Ayton helps the Suns steal wins against elite opponents.Why they won’t make it: Unlike other contenders for the No. 8 seed, Phoenix can’t feast on a weak schedule. Injuries here and there take their toll until the Suns slowly fade away. It’s a terrific season to build on, but the Suns never completely cut down the gap in the loss column.last_img read more

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Lunch Break Facing Severe Shortage

first_imgRED BANK – Critical shortages of food are now being seen on the empty shelves at Lunch Break.Lunch Break is the first line of defense for thousands of people who struggle with hunger throughout Monmouth and Ocean counties, and is serving more and more people every year.According to Gwen Love, executive director of Lunch Break, the number of hot meals served has increased more than 68 percent in the last few years, and the food pantry distributions have increased a staggering 657 percent.Empty food pantry shelves are the result of a severe food shortage at Lunch Break in Red Bank where food distribution has increased by 657 percent during the past few years.“Last year, we served over 56,000 meals and over 500 families depend on Lunch Break every month for their groceries. Add to that our homebound program where we deliver meals six days a week to the elderly, ill, weak and disabled, and the numbers combined are frightening,” she said.“With summer vacation over and the push to get kids back to school and the signs of fall popping up everywhere, at Lunch Break the sign of fall is bare shelves in the pantry,” Love said. “The toughest times of year for us are September and October as well as February and March where we face critical shortages. We try to plan for these months, but with the daily increase in demand for our services, when the food is gone, it’s gone. It’s heart-wrenching to plan and not be able to meet the need. Right now, our resources are critically low.”A month ago Lunch Break was forced to reduce the amount of groceries provided to families from the food pantry.“It’s an overwhelming feeling,” Love said. “If we don’t get food, people are going to go hungry. We’re almost to the season of giving, but we’re not quite there yet. In November donations will really start to pick up, but right now, even though it’s a season of harvest, people just don’t stop to think about the need and that is why we are reaching out to the community. When people realize the need, they are tremendously generous,” Love said.Giving is very easy and safe by donating funds online at www.lunchbreak.org, and the organization also welcomes personal checks or cash at the Lunch Break facility at 121 Drs. James Parker Blvd.Monetary donations give Lunch Break the opportunity to plan meals weeks ahead of time and also give them immense purchasing power. People can also visit the website for the wish list of food items to be donated.“Unfortunately, it’s a sign of the times,” Love said.In a study released recently by the Legal Services of the New Jersey Poverty Research Institute, it concluded that more than 2 million people in New Jersey struggle to meet their basic needs. That represents a significant increase of more than 300,000 since the beginning of the economic recession.Nationally, the poverty line is defined at about $23,000 for a family of four. The study put the threshold at double that number because New Jersey’s cost of living is dramatically higher than the national average.“The worst part is,” Love said, “the study showed that children suffer the most.”Love added that many don’t know that Lunch Break is Monmouth County’s first and most accessible soup kitchen and food pantry, and this year celebrates 30 years alleviating hunger.“Our guests come from near and far – from Keansburg, Keyport, Union Beach, Seaside Heights, Point Pleasant, Neptune and Asbury Park – to name a few. We are open six days a week and we are so much more than a meal to so many. Our Suited for Success program last year outfitted over 125 individuals for job interviews, and we accept new and gently used clothing,” she said.“We provide families with holiday food baskets at Thanksgiving, Easter and Christmas; we offer cooking classes for children; a toy program for children over the December holidays and we partner with over a dozen local social service organizations to provide health screen­ings, visual testing, affordable housing referrals, veterans assistance, and more, all in our facility in Red Bank,” Love said.Lunch Break is located at 121 Drs. James Parker Blvd. in Red Bank, and can be reached at 732-747-8577. For more information about Lunch Break visit www.lunch break.org.last_img read more

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Former County GOP Leader Dies; Monmouth U. Poll

first_imgBy Jay Cook |Republican Stalwart William Dowd RememberedWilliam Dowd, one of Monmouth County’s most visible and influential conservative figures over the past few decades, died earlier this week at the age of 74.A Long Branch resident, Dowd was the face of the Monmouth County Republican Committee while he served as its chairman from 1986 to 2004. That political activism stretched through most of his adult life dating back to his time in law school at Seton Hall University and Rutgers University.After admittance to the New Jersey and New York State Bar associations, Dowd went on to serve as a clerk to Judge James Coleman, a former New Jersey state assemblyman, and state Sen. Richard Stout, according to his obituary. That political career even took him to Washington, D.C., where he was an assistant to U.S. Secretary of the Treasury David Kennedy. Dowd was also a speechwriter as a staff assistant in President Richard Nixon’s administration.Dowd returned to New Jersey and embarked on his own political career. He ran for U.S. Congress unsuccessfully in 1970 and 1972, then won two terms as a state assemblyman from 1978 to 1981, where he served as the Parliamentarian.“He was brilliant – published in the New York Times more than just about any Republican – and a truly independent spirit,” state Sen. Declan O’Scanlon (R-13) said in a statement to New Jersey Globe, which first reported Dowd’s death.In a statement on its public Facebook page, the Monmouth County Republic Committee said Dowd, “made enormous contributions to the quality of life in Monmouth County, both as a Party Leader and through his legal work for many towns and the County. May he rest in peace.”His influence even extended across the partisan aisle. Red Bank Mayor Pasquale Menna, a Democrat, said Dowd was an influential Republican force.“We shared a respect for (Winston) Churchill and (Margaret) Thatcher. He and his firm represented Red Bank during the administration of former Mayor Michael Arnone,” Menna wrote on his Facebook page. “He always maintained his office in Red Bank. Freehold may have been the county seat, but Bill was known to hold his power talks at the courtyard of the Dubliner in the afternoons.” Monmouth U Weighs In on Midterm ElectionsThe strength of New Jersey’s Republican voting base will be put to the test this upcoming election season, much in part to the effect President Donald Trump has had on Garden State voters, one local poll found earlier this month.An April 16 Monmouth University Polling Institute report shows how the so-called Trump Effect could swing many of New Jersey’s Republican seats in the House of Representative over to Democrats.Monmouth University believes Democrats have a “formidable” 19-point advantage over Republicans in a state-wide generic congressional ballot test, while also finding that 54 percent of all registered voters would lean to or vote for a Democrat over a Republican.The “poor public opinion leads the list of factors behind the New Jersey GOP’s underlying problems,” according to Monmouth University’s analysis.That could signal major changes for at least one of the Two River-area congressional districts. U.S. Rep. Chris Smith (NJ-4), a Republican, is up for re-election later this year as he seeks his 20th consecutive term in Washington, D.C. U.S. Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. (NJ-6), a Democrat, is also running for re-election.“This is pretty astounding. Not only are New Jersey Democrats doing better on the generic House ballot statewide, but the shift is coming almost entirely from districts currently held by the GOP. If these results hold, we could be down to just one or two – or maybe even zero – Republican members in the state congressional delegation after November,” said Patrick Murray, director of the independent Monmouth University Polling Institute.New Jersey Democrats hold a 7-5 advantage in seats in the House of Representatives over their Republican colleagues. Every seat is up for re-election in 2018.This article was first published in the April 26-May 3, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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