House-to-House data is not credible!

first_imgDear Editor,Guyanese citizens and other public observers will not deny that the infused Keith Lowenfield wicked and corrupt House-to-House Registration lacks credence and authenticity. It has realised results lacking the potency of acceptance by the majority and as it turns out, driven by agents of the PNCR and the Government to cause deliberate confusion by an approach riddled with misinformation. Further, after the Chairman of GECOM ruled that the House-to-House is to cease on August 31, 2019, it is illegal for Lowenfield and the PNC to extend the time for the enumerators to work.The time for enumerators to do the House-to-House Registration is gazette to take place in the registration areas of Kamarang, Paramakatoi, Mahdia and Annai as follows:1. Monday to Friday 8:00 am to 17:30 pm and on weekends and holidays 9:00 am to 15:30 pm.2. Further, GECOM published in the gazette that official time for the House-to-House Registration exercise is Monday to Friday 15:30 pm to 19:00 pm, and weekends and holidays 09:00 am to 15.30 pm.Hence, it is illegal for GECOM to change the times at their whims and fancy, which raises numerous questions.Many enumerators are also complaining bitterly that they are working and they cannot get time off to work all those hours. Inside sources within GECOM informed that the PNC is trying a thing to get some strange people registered.Why is there a rush to increase the working hours of the enumerators?One would believe that GECOM has already decided to merge the information of the House-to-House Registration with that of the National Register of Registrants Database (NRRDB), without even ascertaining whether the Jamaican model could accurately handle the merger and the cross-checking for the numerous duplications that would unfold.We must appreciate that the imminent Justice Claudette Singh as Chairman of GECOM is in the ‘hottest’ seat and that it is necessary for all Guyanese to give her the required support in belling this huge perpetuated corrupt monster. What the Chairperson has inherited at GECOM is indeed strongly embedded roots of corrupt officials planted to administrate and key aspects of the agency. The auditors are fully aware of serious corruption that took place previously and is taking place at GECOM. Hence, Justice Claudette Singh will have to be thorough in her dealings and sanitise GECOM of all its incompetence.Resulting from this apparent milieu is the persistence of deliberate advisory misinformation peddled from the Secretariat to the Chairman of the Commission. It is clear that the merging of the current House-to-House Registration information to the existing NRRDB would create enormous problems or delays, as some duplications would not be easily identified for elimination, based on the incorrect recording of information during the registration.Certainly, more time would have to be utilised to correct the deliberate mishaps. It is of note that Keith Lowenfield did not invite the PPP as the main Opposition to provide scrutineers for the registration exercise, and thus, significantly compromising the validity of the exercise with regards to monitoring.The way to go to ensure a valid list is simply to go straight to the Claims and Objections where names of those qualified to register is added to the preliminary List of Electors, and the names of the deceased on the list are verified and deleted. This process would provide a far more accurate list than the merging factor and considering that the elections have been due since March, this process would enable an election by October of this year.Sincerely,Neil Kumarlast_img read more

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Activity on Planets Suggests Youth

first_imgCan these processes really have gone on for billions of years?Mars EruptionsMars has polar caps of frozen carbon dioxide that wax and wane through the planet’s seasons. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has been watching the seasonal changes with its HiRISE camera for a decade now. A new paper published in Icarus reports the discovery of new troughs seen forming in polar terrain due to explosive jetting of CO2 as the ice sublimates in the Martian summer. The jets deposit mineral dust and sand on top of the ice, but also carve troughs in the terrain under the ice, creating branching patterns unique to Mars (see example on UAHiRISE page).These jets and the related sub-ice gas flows are believed to carve troughs in the underlying polar deposits which, after multiple repetitions of this process throughout Martian spring seasons, create araneiform [spider-like] terrains….Detection of the present day erosion working in polar areas and creating new topographical features is important for understanding of the processes that shape polar areas. Several years of HiRISE observations provide us with the information about the current rate of erosion and hence help estimate minimum ages of the araneiforms and the surface into which they are carved to be 1.3 × 103 Martian years.Since a Martian year is about 1.88 Earth years, these erosional features are only about 2,500 years old. There is undoubtedly some cycling of material year by year, as new patterns erase old ones. But for this to have been going on for 4.5 billion years (the assumed age of the solar system), the material would have been recycled 1.8 million times by now.Last year, Space.com reported that the Martian atmosphere is being lost to space. NASA’s MAVEN mission, sent to study the Martian atmosphere, surprised astronomers at the amount of loss. It makes it harder to believe enough CO2 remained to create the troughs over and over almost 2 million times.But MAVEN results announced Thursday (Nov. 5 [2015]) show that the planet’s CO2 went up rather than down: Shortly after Mars’ global magnetic field shut down about 4.2 billion years ago, the solar wind and powerful sun explosions stripped away most of the planet’s atmosphere, sending it off into space….“It’s not there,” he said of the atmospheric CO2 during NASA’s news conference Thursday announcing the MAVEN results. “It’s been removed from the solar system entirely, so it’s not possible to bring it back.“In another paper on Icarus (open access), scientists attempted to duplicate the explosive CO2 eruptions in the lab. They could only get the eruptions to occur under special conditions. “We have reproduced dust eruptions from a layer of dust inside a CO2 ice slab under Martian conditions,” they say. “We found that in order to trigger dust eruptions a delicate balance between pressure and temperature near the equilibrium of the CO2 phase change seems to be necessary.” Does that imply that the eruptions we observe today have only started recently? Generally speaking, secular scientists do not like to invoke special conditions for rare phenomena (e.g., Saturn’s rings, the Enceladus geysers, or the Martian jets) that just happen to occur when human beings are lucky enough to witness them.Venus Volcanoes“Volcanoes on Venus Erupted Recently, New Study Suggests.” That’s a headline on Space.com that revisits the mystery of Venus volcanism. Planetary scientists have been baffled by evidence from the Magellan orbital radar mapper in the late 1990s that suggested the entire surface of Venus had been resurfaced by rampant volcanism relatively recently in its assumed 4.5-billion-year history (see “Earth’s ugly sister can’t get a date,” 8/16/04, and follow-up reference, 8/27/09 ). It’s been particularly hard to explain in the absence of plate tectonics. A follow-up question has been whether the volcanoes are still active now, but it’s been hard to tell because of the planet’s thick, hot atmosphere. This article reports a “hotspot” that could be as young as yesterday.Volcanic activity on Venus took place in the recent past, geologically speaking, and may still be happening on the planet today. New research takes a deeper look at one recent eruption on Venus’ surface.The Idunn Mons volcano in the southwestern hemisphere of Venus rises 1.6 miles (2.5 kilometers) above the surrounding plains. In 2010, observations by the European Space Agency’s Venus Express probe revealed that Idunn Mons is a “hotspot,” meaning it radiates high levels of infrared light compared to the surrounding area. That suggests that lava flowed at the spot recently, and that the area is still warm.Now, a more nuanced look at Idunn Mons suggests that the hotspot observations are consistent with multiple (cooled) lava flows along the volcano’s eastern flank, the new research shows. The researchers behind the new work said the finding suggests that Venus’ volcanos were active in the relatively recent past, and may still be active today.Comet TalesThe Rosetta mission is complete, but analysis of the data on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (Chury for short) will continue for years. One surprise was reported by Science Daily: “Comet Chury is much younger than previously thought.” How much younger? “the comet in its present form is hardly more than a billion years old.” Sounds pretty old, but that would be just 22% of the assumed 4.5-billion-year age. What happened after 78% of its life had transpired?Analysis of the “neck” between the two lobes of the duck-shaped comet shows that it is too delicate to have survived the many collisions it should have suffered throughout its existence. To rescue the assumed age, they invoke a finely-tuned collision in its senior years, not enough to blast the comet to smithereens but strong enough to break it apart. That resulted in the two lobes separating, then recombining by gravity. It must be remembered, however, that comets lose material each time they come near the sun.A paper in Nature reports on observations of the dust on Comet Chury. “Comets are thought to preserve almost pristine dust particles,” the Rosetta scientists begin, proceeding to interpret contradictory evidence about their building blocks. Previous missions found processed material that could not be considered pristine. Rosetta’s in-situ measurements show a hierarchical pattern of dust grains that the astonomers interpret as consistent with interplanetary dust particles from which the solar system presumably condensed. That, however, sounds circular; they are pristine, therefore we interpret them to look pristine. Some processing of theory appears to be in progress. Commenting on the paper in Nature, Ludmilla Kolokolova concludes,The authors’ results enhance our fundamental understanding of cometary dust, and the processes that ultimately gave rise to planetary systems such as the Solar System. Their discovery of a hierarchical structure in cometary dust particles and their description of the basic building blocks of such particles might lead physicists to reconsider the interpretation of data obtained from ground-based observations of comets and re-evaluate the processes in protoplanetary nebulae — and will probably give rise to new models of how planets were formed.How Planets Were FormedBut do astronomers really know much about how planets formed? We conclude this entry with a link to Science Daily that overthrows previous speculations about planets condensing out of stellar disks. Scientists got all excited last March about a putative “protoplanetary disk” forming around star TW Hydrae. Gaps in the disk seemed to be orbits where new planets were accreting. Sorry, the article concludes: it’s not the birth of a solar system, but likely its death. Photoevaporation in the disk from starlight is likely causing the disk to dissipate.Destructive processes – recent processes – special epochs in planetary history: these are not predictions of secular models. They are anomalies requiring theory rescue devices. A simple look at the evidence suggests that real physical processes are tearing down order, not creating it, and doing it in far less time than billions of years. (Visited 49 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Using David White’s Global Warming Calculator

first_imgAs in the previous two graphs, the cellulose curve keeps going down. The more you use, the more you decrease the global warming impact. With ccSPF and XPS, however, there’s a minimum and then a rise. For XPS, the sweet spot is at about R-25, so you could add about 2″ for another R-10. For ccSPF, the minimum is about R-40, so you could add 3 to 4 inches for another R-25 or so.To stay below the yellow line, you’d want to limit XPS to about R-25, or 5″. You could go beyond R-60 total with ccSPF, but why would you want to? In my last article, I showed that unless you’re in a really severe climate, you could even achieve Passive House walls with R-50 or less.ConclusionsThis global warming calculator from David White is a useful tool. Rather than trying to calculate payback, it gives you the numbers for global warming impact. You can look at the curves for different insulation types and see where your sweet spot is. One thing I think would make it even better would be if it allowed you to look at the effect of an entire assembly instead of just individual insulation types with a reference R-value.If you download my presentation slides, you’ll see these conclusions:Global warming impact isn’t as simple as it seemedBlanket condemnation of XPS and ccSPF based on payback are not warrantedAvoid XPSUse ccSPF with other blowing agents (that is, blowing agents with a lower global warming potential)Use David White’s calculator for more refined guidance.The big one there is in the middle: Avoid XPS. In terms of global warming impact due to the HFC-134a blowing agent, it’s the worst.It’s also relatively easy to substitute another type of insulation for XPS. On walls, you can use mineral wool or polyisocyanurate. For slabs, you can use expanded polystyrene (EPS) or mineral wool. So just use something else.Manufacturers are tight-lipped about what blowing agents they’re using these days. Some of the spray foam companies have switched over to the next generation blowing agents with much lower global warming potential. I don’t know of XPS manufacturers who have announced changes, but a rep from manufacturer did tell me they’re not using HFC-134a anymore. When I asked what they used, he said, “I can’t tell you that.”In general, all insulation types can help mitigate the effects of climate change. Types with the bad blowing agents, however, have limits to their effectiveness. If you’re planning to use XPS or closed cell spray foam, the tool from David White can help you decide where to draw the line. Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, building science consultant, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard. I wrote an article in September about the carbon intensity of electricity by state. I posted an expanded version of the article that included carbon intensity by regional interconnect. The state data show a wider range than the regional data, varying from less than 0.1 kilograms of CO2 per kilowatt-hour produced up to about 0.95 kg CO2/kWh. In this analysis, I called the “clean” electricity that which had a carbon intensity of 0.1 kg CO2/kWh and the dirty electricity that with 0.95 kg CO2/kWh.Clearly, the cleaner the electricity, the less you can affect affect global warming emissions by saving energy. In the graph above, notice how low the yellow line is. As the the three insulation curves diverge from the R-14 starting point, only the cellulose makes sense here. (Again, there are a lot of other insulation types that perform similarly to cellulose. I just haven’t shown them here.)Electric heat pump with “dirty” electricityWith dirty electricity, the effectiveness of insulation is much better. The resulting payback showed how long it would take to save enough energy to offset the global warming emissions from the embodied energy in the insulation and from the release of blowing agents with global warming potential (GWP). He looked at several different insulation types and a range of R-values.The first part of my conference presentation covered what I see as the main flaw with his payback calculations. In the second part, I discussed David White’s spreadsheet tool for calculating the global warming impact of insulation. The nice thing about his calculator is that you can change a lot of the variables and see what the effects are.I showed three scenarios in my conference presentation. I’ll put them in a different order here, beginning with the gas furnace. If you download the presentation file, you’ll find the two for heat pumps before the one for the furnace.Gas furnaceThe graph below shows the output from David White’s calculator for the gas furnace. RELATED ARTICLES Revisiting the Debate Over Global Warming and InsulationMore About Global Warming and Insulation The Misleading Numbers Behind the Global Warming Impact of InsulationAvoiding the Global Warming Impact of InsulationCalculating the Global Warming Impact of Insulation New Blowing Agent Addresses Climate Impact of Foam InsulationInsulation to Keep Us Warm — Not Warm the Planetcenter_img Everyone knows about the impact of burning fossil fuels on global warming. Maybe not everyone believes it, but scientists first started focusing attention on increasing carbon dioxide levels way back in 1827. The impact of insulation on global warming, however, is relatively new.About a decade ago, Professor L.D. Danny Harvey started looking at the effect of blowing agents released by the production and use of some foam insulation types. Then Alex Wilson picked it up in 2010.At the 2016 North American Passive House Conference, I presented my views on this topic. I wrote about the first part of my talk in my last GBA article. Today, I cover the part about using David White’s global warming tool for insulation.BackgroundIn his calculations, Alex Wilson chose one scenario. He looked at the global warming impact for a house heated with a natural gas furnace. He chose a cold climate with 5,000 heating degree days (HDD), and he didn’t include cooling. There’s a whole lot going on here, so let me first give you the lay of the land. This tool doesn’t calculate payback. Instead it calculates global warming impact, as measured by the kilograms of carbon dioxide emitted per square foot of wall area per year (kg CO2/sf/yr). That’s on the vertical axis. On the horizontal axis is the total R-value of the assembly. To the right of the graph, I posted a sidebar with the main inputs I used.One important thing to note: I used version 1-2 of White’s tool. It doesn’t include cooling. PHIUS has version 1-3 on their website, and it has the ability to include cooling energy in the calculations.Let’s dive into the results now. There are three curves on the graph. They show the global warming impact for cellulose (red), closed-cell spray polyurethane foam (green), and extruded polystyrene (blue). The calculator has a lot more options for insulation types, but I chose these three since they capture the important differences. Most of the others are similar to cellulose.I chose a reference R-value of 14. That matches what Wilson did in his calculations and means that we already have a wall equivalent to 2×6 cavities insulated with cellulose. The whole-wall R-value of that assembly is about 14. On the graph above, the three curves all begin at R-14.It’s what happens when add more insulation beyond the R-14 that gives you some guidance here. In this case, all three see their global warming impact drop as you go up from R-14. But cellulose has a different behavior than the other two. It just keeps dropping whereas the other two hit a minimum and then begin rising again.For closed-cell spray polyurethane foam (ccSPF), that minimum occurs in the mid-R-30 region. As you add this insulation type, the global warming impact keeps getting better and better until you’ve added about R-20. That would be about 3 inches of ccSPF.For extruded polystyrene (XPS), the minimum comes more quickly, at about R-19. Once you add about R-5 (or 1 inch) of XPS, the global warming impact begins to rise.When I discussed using this tool with David White and others, most believed that if you’re going to use XPS or ccSPF, you shouldn’t go further than the minimum. I drew the yellow line on the graph, however, to show where the net effect of adding XPS or ccSPF goes from positive to negative. With XPS, you can add about another R-5 before your assembly becomes worse for global warming than if you hadn’t added any extra insulation at all. With ccSPF, it’s beyond R-60, which, at about 7 inches, is also beyond the point that most people would use this type of insulation.Electric heat pump with “clean” electricityNow let’s look at the results for a heat pump. First, here’s the scenario for a house that uses “clean” electricity.last_img read more

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Suzuki V-Strom 650XT ABS launched in India at Rs 7.46 lakh

first_imgSuzuki Motorcycle India Pvt Ltd has introduced an upgraded variant of its all-terrain touring bike V-Strom, the V-Strom 650XT ABS, for a price starting at Rs 7.46 lakh (ex-showroom, Delhi). The new generation has been given several tweaks for better performance, more control and ample versatility.The 2019 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT ABS gets a four stroke, liquid-cooled, DOHC with 90 degree and 645 cm3 V-twin engine having new technology such as the resin-coated pistons. Over 60 engine components have been revised for higher output in a broad area of the rev-range, while keeping the unique V-Twin character with low fuel consumption. The bike is available in two colour options — Champion Yellow and Pearl Glacier White.The instrument cluster on the new 650 now has a large analogue tachometer and digital readouts for the gear position and speedometer. The digital section below displays the odometer, twin-trip meter, clock, fuel level, coolant temperature, ambient temperature, battery voltage, range on remaining fuel, average and instantaneous fuel consumptions and traction-control modes.The new V-Strom features tubeless tyre-applicable wire-spoked wheels. The Champion Yellow coloured model features gold-anodised rims in contrast to the black-anodised items on the Pearl Glacier White. Wheel sizes are 19-inch on the front and 17-inch on the rear. The advanced traction control system on the bike monitors its front and rear wheel speeds, throttle position, crank position, gear position with various sensors and controls the engine output by managing the ignition timing and air delivery.The traction control system can be switched off or to either of two modes. Mode one allows modest rear wheel spin for more advanced riding, while mode two activates traction control at the slightest loss of rear-wheel grip to help the rider on slippery surfaces or in the rain.advertisementThe 2019 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT ABS comes equipped with 310 mm diameter twin discs with twin two piston calipers on the front and a 260 mm diameter single disk with a single piston caliper on the rear. The company also claims that the compact and light-weight ABS has been upgraded to the next generation with advanced settings.Talking about the overall dimensions of the new bike, its length is 2,275 mm, width 910 mm, height 1,405 mm, wheelbase 1,560 mm, ground clearance 170 mm, seat height 835 mm and kerb mass 216 kg.The refurbished tank on V-Strom 650XT ABS has a capacity of 20 litres. Also by eliminating the plastic covers on both sides of the tank from the previous model, the company has made it slimmer and it can now accommodate magnetically attachable tank bags.The accessory bar on the new bike underlines the adventure touring look for it. It has been given a matte black powder coat finish and 2 mm thick steel tube for mounting LED fog lights. The top case has a capacity of 55 litres and can accommodate two helmets. The chain guard has been made out of powder coated aluminium and displays the V-Strom logo.ALSO READ | Land Rover launches 2019 Discovery Sport Landmark Edition, price starts at Rs 53.77 lakhALSO READ | Tata Motors increases prices of Hexa, SUV now starts at Rs 12.99 lakhALSO READ | Mahindra XUV300 safety features revealed, company claims several segment-first attributes in the new SUVlast_img read more

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