Multi-level unit to be sold under the hammer

first_img4/7 Alexandra St, North Ward.Spread over two floors, the apartment is bigger than some houses and has three outdoor areas including two levels of balcony and a courtyard that is cut into the side of Castle Hill.Smith and Elliott selling agent Debra Ohlin said the unique qualities of the unit made it difficult to value, which was why it was going to auction. 4/7 Alexandra St, North Ward.More from news01:21Buyer demand explodes in Townsville’s 2019 flood-affected suburbs12 Sep 202001:21‘Giant surge’ in new home sales lifts Townsville property market10 Sep 2020“It’s a bit unique with the two levels and it’s big like a small home but there is only four units in the complex,” she said.“It’s very hard to put a price on something when it’s so unique so I think it’s a good idea to put it to auction and see what the buyers think. In my 16 years of selling real estate I don’t think I’ve seen a unit with a layout like this.”It’s the first time the unit has been offered since it was built nine years ago.Properties in Alexandra St have become popular due to the prime location being in walking distance to The Strand, Townsville Grammar School and also being close to the CBD.It’s filled with character homes with many Queenslanders being purchased and superbly renovated, while many Townsville medical professionals call the street home.The modern unit has no maintenance and low body corporate fees. 4/7 Alexandra St, North Ward.A TWO-LEVEL unit in one of Townsville’s most popular streets will be sold under the hammer.The property, at 4/7 Alexandra St, North Ward, will go to auction on site on February 24 at 11am.The large unit has four bedrooms, two bathrooms and three car spaces.center_img 4/7 Alexandra St, North Ward.The upper level contains a parents’ retreat with an ensuite, walk in robe and balcony.As well as three-car accommodation there is also lockable storage and the apartment has an intercom and lift access.It’s fully airconditioned and there is a 5KW solar system installed.Ms Ohlin said the unit was attracting plenty of interest from a range of buyers, with 21 groups coming through the first open home.“There has been families with children going to Townsville Grammar School, I’ve had retirees and I’ve also had executive couples that want space but don’t want a house because of the maintenance,” she said.“I don’t think it will be one for first home buyers because it will be out of their range.”The home will be open for inspection today and tomorrow from 11am to 11.30am.For more information call Ms Ohlin on 0402 917 226.last_img read more

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Prop 24 causes debate

first_imgUSC College Democrats and Republicans said they hold opposing viewpoints for Proposition 24, which aims to repeal $1.7 billion in tax breaks that corporations would receive, starting in January 2011.The tax break legislature that was approved in 2009 — which would be repealed by Prop 24 — is split into three main components; the single sales factor, the ability to carry back losses and tax credit sharing.The single sales factor will allow corporations to pick which category — from sales, payroll or property — that they will be taxed on rather than being taxed on all three. Corporations that are struggling will be able to receive refunds for taxes paid in the last two years, and tax credit sharing would allow corporations to spread their tax credits among their affiliated businesses.USC College Democrats said they would endorse Proposition 24, Repeal of Corporate Tax Breaks.“This is a no-brainer; corporate tax loopholes are not helping the economy; the money should be going to education. Proposition 24 allows this money to go where it belongs,” said Micah Scheindlin, political director of the USC College Democrats.USC College Republicans President Katherine Cook said the group is urging voters to vote no on Proposition 24 because the existing law attracts new business to California, which helps create jobs.“This legislation makes it easier for businesses to stay afloat, for Californians to start their own new businesses, and keeps existing businesses in California,” Cook said. She also emphasized the importance of keeping and creating new jobs, citing California’s current 12.4 percent unemployment rate.Voting yes on this proposition would repeal all aspects of the above legislature, while voting no would enable it to continue without any changes.“The state government estimates that if [the legislation] went into effect, the short run cost would be $700 million in reduced tax collections. However, in the long run, it would attract more businesses to California, creating more jobs and expanding the tax base,” said Charles Swenson, professor at the Marshall School of Business, who is also an expert on taxation policy and economics.According to a Public Policy Institute of California statewide survey, there is no firm majority hold on the issue at present, with 31 percent of voters in favor of the proposition, 38 percent against and 31 percent undecided.Julius Cotton, a senior majoring in business administration, said he already voted in favor of the proposition because if passed, the new law would redirect capital to citizens in California.“The tax breaks are just corporations buying their way out of trouble at the expense of citizens,” Cotton said.“I would vote to give corporations a break as an incentive to finally do something useful,” said Samantha Ma, a junior majoring in biomedical engineering.Proposition 24 holds a lot of weight with both California businesses and citizens alike who are ultimately hoping to bring the state out of its dire financial situation. If the proposition passes, corporations estimate between 146,000 and 322,000 lost jobs, according to an economic analysis by Claremont McKenna College.“This is a really technical issue which is best handled by the legislature. Voters should not be forced to try to understand this,” Swenson said.last_img read more

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