Full circumpolar migration ensures evolutionary unity in the Emperor penguin

first_imgDefining reliable demographic models is essential to understand the threats of ongoing environmental change. Yet, in the most remote and threatened areas, models are often based on the survey of a single population, assuming stationarity and independence in population responses. This is the case for the Emperor penguin Aptenodytes forsteri, a flagship Antarctic species that may be at high risk continent-wide before 2100. Here, using genome-wide data from the whole Antarctic continent, we reveal that this top-predator is organized as one single global population with a shared demography since the late Quaternary. We refute the view of the local population as a relevant demographic unit, and highlight that (i) robust extinction risk estimations are only possible by including dispersal rates and (ii) colony-scaled population size is rather indicative of local stochastic events, whereas the species’ response to global environmental change is likely to follow a shared evolutionary trajectorylast_img read more

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Re-examining the roles of surface heat flux and latent heat release in a “hurricane-like” polar low over the Barents Sea

first_imgPolar lows are intense mesoscale cyclones that occur at high latitudes in both hemispheres during winter. Their sometimes evidently convective nature, fueled by strong surface fluxes and with cloud-free centers, have led to some polar lows being referred to as “arctic hurricanes.” Idealized studies have shown that intensification by hurricane development mechanisms is theoretically possible in polar winter atmospheres, but the lack of observations and realistic simulations of actual polar lows have made it difficult to ascertain if this occurs in reality. Here the roles of surface heat fluxes and latent heat release in the development of a Barents Sea polar low, which in its cloud structures showed some similarities to hurricanes, are studied with an ensemble of sensitivity experiments, where latent heating and/or surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat were switched off before the polar low peaked in intensity. To ensure that the polar lows in the sensitivity runs did not track too far away from the actual environmental conditions, a technique known as spectral nudging was applied. This was shown to be crucial for enabling comparisons between the different model runs. The results presented here show that (1) no intensification occurred during the mature, postbaroclinic stage of the simulated polar low; (2) surface heat fluxes, i.e., air-sea interaction, were crucial processes both in order to attain the polar low’s peak intensity during the baroclinic stage and to maintain its strength in the mature stage; and (3) latent heat release played a less important role than surface fluxes in both stages.last_img read more

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Baseball team apologizes for showing controversial video of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail(FRESNO, Calif.) — A minor league baseball team in California is apologizing after showing a video on Memorial Day that was edited in a way that appeared to place Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez among “enemies of freedom,” including North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un and former Cuban leader Fidel Castro.cmannphoto/iStockThe video was shown by the Fresno Grizzlies, the AAA affiliate of the Washington Nationals, in between the team’s doubleheader home games against the El Paso Chihuahuas on Monday.The three-minute, 35-second-long video, which the team said in a statement was “pre-produced…from outside [their] front office,” featured audio clips from former President Ronald Reagan’s first inaugural address in 1981 over images and videos of America, members of the military and Arlington National Cemetery. The team said the video was meant to be shown as “a moving tribute.”In the video, when Reagan’s speech refers to “enemies of freedom” and “potential adversaries,” a photo of Ocasio-Cortez was shown between images of Kim Jong-Un and Fidel Castro.The Grizzlies called the video’s editing “misleading and offensive,” and said it “made a statement that was not [the team’s] intent and certainly not [the team’s] opinion.”“We apologize to our fans and to our community for the error and for not properly vetting the video,” the Grizzlies tweeted early Tuesday. “We also apologize to those who have served and are currently serving the country for the undue distraction on such a solemn day.”Paul Braverman, the Grizzlies’ media relations manager, told ABC News the video was “selected in haste from YouTube,” and that the employee who chose it was “completely remorseful.”“We’re embarrassed we allowed this video to play without seeing it in its entirety first,” the Grizzlies tweeted. “We unconditionally apologize to Rep. Ocasio-Cortez (@AOC) in addition to our fans, community and those we hurt. It was a mistake and we will ensure that nothing like it ever happens again.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Written by May 28, 2019 /Sports News – National Baseball team apologizes for showing controversial video of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortezcenter_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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£4,000 – the cost of upgrading an agent’s office to meet Covid rules

first_imgAn estate agent in Leamington Spa has revealed the cost of getting her Belvoir branch ready to re-open after the Covid crisis.Sue Warburton, who runs Belvoir’s award-winning Leamington Spa franchise in Warwickshire with her husband John, says it cost the business £4,000 in Covid protection measures to ensure her office adhered to the current legislation.“It’s been a bit weird and everyone’s brought in their own cutlery and plates to eat their lunch and are a bit jumpy about using the kettle, but otherwise, as far as possible, it’s do-able and business is picking up,” she says.Her branch re-opened on 15th June and most of her 18 staff had, prior to that, worked from home after being brought back from furlough on 8th June.She says that the business has been extremely busy both prior to and after its office on Regent Grove in Leamington Spa re-opened following the Covid lockdown.Warburton says that, although she wishes none of her competitors any ill-will, she has been surprised by some agents’ decisions not to re-open their businesses.“I’ve heard of landlords who simply couldn’t get through to their existing letting agent because they had shut up shop and weren’t taking calls,” she says.Kenny callSue also used the lockdown to good use – and was one of the first in the industry to use Agents Together’s mentoring services and was put through to Kenny Bruce for her first and subsequent sessions.“I had to Google who he was afterwards and although I’m no fan of Purplebricks, his knowledge and advice was useful and he really listened properly to what I was saying,” she says.“I’ve booked in all my staff to do the same mentoring as I believe everyone in the industry needs a little help at the moment, and if Agents Together is going to carry on offering for free then ‘why not?’.” leamtington spa John Warburton Sue Warburton Belvoir June 29, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » £4,000 – the cost of upgrading an agent’s office to meet Covid rules previous nextAgencies & People£4,000 – the cost of upgrading an agent’s office to meet Covid rulesBelvoir franchisee in Warwickshire reveals surprisingly high expense of ensuring its branch was safe for staff to work in and for customers to visit.Nigel Lewis29th June 202001,350 Viewslast_img read more

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Sturdy Savings Bank Sponsors Concert Series for Jersey Shore Pops

first_imgSturdy Savings Bank Director of Retail Banking David Repici presents a check to Jersey Shore Pops Conductor and Musical Director Linda Gentille in support of the organization’s 2019 Summer Concert Series. (Photo courtesy Suasion) Sturdy Savings Bank Director of Retail Banking David Repici recently presented a sponsorship check to Jersey Shore Pops Conductor and Musical Director Linda Gentille.Sturdy Savings Bank is sponsoring the organization’s 2019 Summer Concert Series.“We are proud to support the Jersey Shore Pops performances, which entertain thousands in our community annually,” said Sturdy Savings Bank President Jerry Reeves.Sturdy Savings Bank serves Cape May and Atlantic Counties at 14 branches located in Avalon, Cape May, Cape May Court House, Dennisville, Marmora, North Cape May, North Wildwood, Ocean City, Rio Grande, Somers Point, Stone Harbor, Tuckahoe, and Wildwood Crest.Each of Sturdy’s branches is dedicated to the communities it serves and often donates to local organizations and supports the schools.The Jersey Shore Pops (JSP) is a professional orchestra that performs classical and popular music concerts with international guest artists and educates adults, young people, and special populations throughout southern New Jersey about classical music. The orchestra provides the Cape May County with a Summer Concert Series and performs eight to 10 concerts each year in the county.For more information about Sturdy Savings Bank, visit www.sturdyonline.com or call 609-463-5220. For more information about the Jersey Shore Pops, please visit www.jerseyshorepops.org.last_img read more

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Hasty Pudding is set

first_imgActress Anne Hathaway will parade through Harvard Square as Hasty Pudding’s Woman of the Year this Thursday (Jan. 28). Last year’s honoree Renée Zellweger braved arctic temperatures while surrounded by a cluster of half-dressed Hasty jokesters before being feted inside the New College Theatre at 12 Holyoke St. Let’s hope this year’s weather is more forgiving as Hathaway, star of such films as “The Devil Wears Prada” and “Rachel Getting Married,” receives her Pudding Pot at 3:15 p.m. inside the theater, followed by a preview of the new Hasty Pudding spectacle, “Commie Dearest.”Man of the Year Justin Timberlake will bring sexy back to Harvard on Feb. 5, where he will be roasted in good fashion at 8:10 p.m. inside the New College Theatre. Singer Timberlake, a New Mickey Mouse Club veteran, was catapulted to stardom as a member of boy-band ’N Sync, but has proved to be multitalented with his turns as a solo singer and as an actor in the films “Alpha Dog” and “Black Snake Moan.” He also proved his comedic chops in his infamous work with “Saturday Night Live.”For more information on the events.last_img read more

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Jeremy Lin ’10 signs with Warriors

first_imgFormer Harvard guard and three-time All-Ivy League honoree Jeremy Lin ’10 has signed a multiple-year professional contract with the Golden State Warriors of the National Basketball Association (NBA). Lin is attempting to become the first Asian-American player to play in the NBA since Rex Walters was a member of the Miami Heat in 2000.Lin is also in line to be the first Ivy League player to play for an NBA team since University of Pennsylvania’s Matt Maloney suited up for the Atlanta Hawks and Yale University’s Chris Dudley was a member of the Portland Trail Blazers in 2003. In his first game with the Warriors, Lin will join former Harvard standouts Saul Mariaschin ’47 (Boston Celtics) and Edward Smith ’51 (New York Knicks) as Crimson players who have seen time in the NBA.A native of Palo Alto, Calif., who guided Palo Alto High School to a state championship, Lin will now join his hometown professional franchise. Lin recently averaged 9.8 points, 3.2 rebounds, 1.8 assists, and 1.2 steals per game while playing with the Dallas Mavericks Summer League team earlier this month. He scored 13 points against the Washington Wizards on July 15 and enjoyed a pair of 12-point efforts against the Denver Nuggets on July 9 and the Sacramento Kings on July 18.  Lin, who stands at 6’3”, also shot 54.5 percent from the floor and 66.7 percent from behind the arc while averaging 18.6 minutes in those five games.As a senior in 2009-10, Lin, 21, was a finalist for the Bob Cousy Award, which goes to the nation’s top point guard as well as the John R. Wooden Award for the national player of the year. A four-time Ivy League Player of the Week honoree this past season, Lin led the Crimson in scoring as a senior with 16.4 points per game. He also paced Harvard with 4.6 assists per contest and topped the Ancient Eight with 71 steals, marking the third straight year he finished first in the Ivy League in steals. Harvard also enjoyed the program’s winningest season in 2009-10, as the team recorded 21 victories and qualified for the postseason for the first time since 1946.A U.S. Basketball Writers Association and National Association of Basketball Coaches all-district team honoree, as well as a Lou Henson All-America selection, Lin completed his Harvard career as the only player in Ivy League history to record 1,450 points (1,482), 450 rebounds (494), 400 assists (406), and 200 steals (225). Lin helped rewrite the Harvard record books, as he finished his career first in all-time games played (115) and was second in steals and fifth in points and assists.For more on Crimson athletics.last_img read more

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Improving emotional wellness for students

first_imgAfter completing a 15-month inquiry, a special task force on student mental health this week released eight recommendations for ways the University can improve emotional wellness on campus by addressing a mix of academic, social, and institutional issues.The Task Force on Managing Student Mental Health was convened by Provost Alan M. Garber in February of 2019 to begin assessing and responding to significant increases in both student self-reports of mental health issues and the subsequent use of related services — upticks that reflected a national trend in higher education.“The Task Force has thoroughly examined the challenges that our students were facing even before the COVID-19 pandemic upended their lives,” Garber said. “The needs highlighted by this report — for greater connection, for wider adoption of and help with self-care, for more accessible support in dealing with everyday struggles as well as mental health conditions, and for better coordination of mental health strategies across the University — are made even more pressing by the uncertainty and isolation that everyone experiences now. At a time when mental health and well-being demand more of our attention than ever, the report points us toward steps we can take now.”The Task Force began its work by looking at existing data, gaining a solid understanding of the nature of mental health concerns among Harvard students. The group itself was large, consisting of 46 individuals from across the University’s Schools and units as well as outside experts. And it was diverse, including psychologists, psychiatrists, academics, experts on running institutions, and professionals who provide one-to-one support for students facing mental health issues, undergraduate and graduate students, and faculty members.“Our investigation confirmed that Harvard students are experiencing rising levels of depression and anxiety disorders, and high and widespread levels of anxiety, depression, loneliness, and other conditions,” wrote co-chairs Mario Small, Emma Dench, and Matt Nock. “In addition, undergraduates reported high levels of stress, overwork, concern about measuring up to peers, and inability to maintain healthy coping strategies. Extracurricular activities, rather than providing unqualified relief, often represented another source of competition and stress. Graduate and professional students reported high levels of isolation, uncertainty about academic and career prospects, and, among those in Ph.D. programs, financial insecurity and concerns about their relation to advisers. Students at all levels reported a lack of clarity about when, how, and where to seek help with potential mental health concerns. The problems we identified were not universal, but were sufficiently widespread to merit action.”After identifying and describing the scope of issues, the Task Force turned its attention to making suggestions for improvements. And while the project was not conceived as one that would be ongoing, the report points to the need for a continuing study of the community’s evolving needs and the resources necessary to meet them.The recommendations include:Tasking a small team within the Provost’s Office to work on student affairs University-wide. This team would coordinate the implementation of recommendations across the University and facilitate further study of issues where the Task Force was only able to scratch the surface.Launching a one-year campaign focused on mental health awareness and culture change, with the goal of cultivating an environment in which students feel encouraged and empowered to care for their mental, physical, and emotional well-being.Instituting a yearly messaging program focused on core elements of the first campaign.Creating a committee to explore ways to make Counseling and Mental Health Services (CAMHS) more accessible. These would include continuing to examine wait times and recent efforts to ensure a diverse and culturally sensitive counseling staff, while also exploring the potential of digital assessments and interventions.Examining how the University can address holistically issues of mental health, sexual climate, inclusiveness, isolation, and sense of belonging.Addressing any institutional service gaps that may have been created by recent organizational changes. The Task Force noted the importance of ensuring that CAMHS coordinate closely with the new Academic Resource Center of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) to ensure a seamless flow between the two entities.Creating a committee in FAS to explore how to reduce the stress caused by the process of competing for entry into extracurricular activities. The report notes that the practice of “comping” for clubs and extracurricular activities emerged throughout its research as a major stressor for undergraduate students. And while some competition may be necessary for certain clubs, there is space for making it less onerous and encouraging the creation of noncompetitive alternatives.Providing clear guidance and mentoring support to faculty and graduate students to ease the potential stress caused by adviser-advisee relationships. The report details the importance of these ties to graduate students’ careers and recommends several measures including 1) adopting an advising structure that diffuses power rather than concentrating it with one adviser; 2) clarifying expectations through the development of clear “rights and responsibilities” guidelines and workplace expectations; 3) encouraging mentorship training for faculty; 4) examining how hiring, promotion, and annual evaluation processes can be used to encourage better mentorship; and 5) considering the implications of student financial need for mental health.The Task Force met as a group for the last time in March. In the intervening months much has changed, including the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic and the events triggered by the death of George Floyd. It is anticipated that these, along with other, as-yet unforeseen events, will continue to alter the landscape of mental health at Harvard, and only increase the need for innovative programming. Provost convenes task force to address students’ psychological well-being “It is clear to us that the dramatic disruptions to social life created by the pandemic will affect, and in some cases worsen, the problems we have identified,” wrote the co-chairs. “Economic stress, high unemployment, social isolation, loss of life, and many other conditions produce grief, stress, loneliness, despair, and more. The University has and must continue to respond, both in the short term and in the long term.” And while the Task Force finished its work prior to the worldwide spread of COVID-19, the co-chairs “believe that our recommendations will prove essential for the University to implement as part of any response, not only to help understand the landscape in which the crisis reached us, but also to inform how to take the steps needed to return to some measure of normality.”“Our current challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic further accentuate the role of mental health and well-being in the student experience,” said Harvard University Health Services Executive Director Giang Nguyen. “All of us — students, faculty, and staff — are facing these challenges in different ways; as a community, it is so important for us to support each other, even if we are not in the same physical space. Students from marginalized communities have been hit particularly hard — our BIPOC [Black, indigenous, and people of color], LGBTQ, international, first-gen, low-income, and other minority students will need targeted support. The work of the Task Force is more important than ever.” A proactive response as student mental health issues increase at Harvard and nationwide Relatedlast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s extends spring break to March 20, suspends all in-person classes while providing option to return to campus

first_imgSaint Mary’s will extend spring break until March 20, providing faculty time to prepare online courses, the College announced in an email Wednesday. All in-person classes are suspended from March 23 to at least April 13, and students will be provided with online coursework.This announcement follows the suspension of all in-person classes at Notre Dame and several other Indiana universities, in the midst of the continued spread of COVID-19 in the U.S.“To be clear, all students must take their courses online,” interim president Nancy Nekvasil said in the email. “An email with further instruction regarding coursework will be sent to students next week.”Titi Ufomata, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, will contact faculty regarding the preparation of these online courses.Students in clinical programs will hear from their departments.Registration for fall courses has also been pushed back to March 23. The remaining Saint Mary’s study abroad programs are not suspended at this time, Nekvasil said.“We continue to work with our study abroad programs and host institutions to develop the best course of action relating to the remainder of the semester,” she said. “Know that this is a dynamic situation and we are monitoring the CDC, the State Department, and the World Health Organization very carefully.”All non-essential faculty and staff domestic and international travel is suspended at this time.Though classes will be held remotely, students in the residence halls are provided the the option to return to campus. “Our campus will remain open,” Nekvasil said. “Administrative offices will remain operational, as well as campus safety. Staff will continue reporting to work as usual.”All students — those remaining at home and those returning to campus — will be required to complete their coursework online. Students returning to the College will be asked to fill out a travel information form scheduled to be provided soon. The Noble Family dining hall will remain open with adjusted service hours, though its “configuration … will be modified in response to the recommended social distancing guidelines.”All other campus dining options will be closed. “Some essential student personnel who are currently not on campus will be asked to return to campus and will be directly notified,” Nekvasil said. “Following social distancing recommendations, non-essential interactions between staff and students should be avoided.”Those who regularly visit the convent are asked to refrain from doing so until notified.“Some of our most vulnerable campus residents are our Sisters,” Nekvasil said. “We do not want to expose them unnecessarily.”Larger gatherings and group events are to be assessed on a case-by-case basis.Meet Me on the Avenue, a prospective student event has been re-scheduled for April 19, and Junior Moms Weekend has been cancelled. All registration fees will be refunded.“The College has taken proactive steps to try to minimize the risks for our community,” Nekvasil said. “Other future College events will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.”Further information will be provided by Linda Timm, interim vice president for student affairs.“Now, more than ever, we need to be mindful of practicing healthy habits,” Nekvasil said. “Unfortunately the fear that comes with a threat to communities, such as we see with coronavirus, often leads individuals to target certain ethnic groups resulting in incidents of bias and harassment. I will uphold my commitment to respecting the dignity of every individual and expect all members of the Saint Mary’s family to do the same.”Tags: coronavirus, COVID-19, Interim President Nancy Nekvasil, Online classes, Spring Breaklast_img read more

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Holiday Employment.

first_imgUnemployment rates are likely to drop during the next few weeks. But don’t get too jolly over the joyful jobless news. “Unemployment is cyclical,” said Doug Bachtel, a professor of housing and consumer economics for the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences. “During the holidays, unemployment rates tend to be lower because of the huge demand in the retail sector,” he said. “For a while, Georgia has suffered from an employment shortage,” he said, “and retailers have had to grab any warm body they can — vacationing teachers and students, anybody — to work during the busy holiday season.” However, Bachtel warned, “there are those who believe the pending recession will hit Georgia hard.”Georgia’s Diversified Economy Softens Blow Georgia usually fares well in hard times because of a diversified economy. The hardest-hit part is likely to be rural areas, where the economy depends precariously on agriculture. “Rural Georgia will be hurt really badly,” Bachtel predicted. “The state has a diversified economy, but rural Georgia doesn’t. They are dependent on a boom-or-bust agricultural economy.” “The economic problems currently are in crop farming,” said UGA economist Bill Givan. “Livestock prices are pretty good.” Crop farming is done mostly below Macon. Peanut growers are faring well and tobacco farmers a little less so. “Cotton and grains are facing low prices,” he said. “But government payments will help.” In general, Givan said, “rural Georgia dependent on crop farming is having a tough time.”Employment Rates Hit 20-Year High A recent Georgia Department of Labor report shows Georgia’s unemployment numbers already growing. More than 65,220 Georgians filed initial claims for unemployment insurance benefits in October. These claims pushed the state’s jobless rate up to 4.2 percent from 4.0 percent in September. The new claims are 98 percent more than the 32,980 workers who filed initial claims in October 2000, when the rate was 3.7 percent. “The effects of Sept. 11 are clearly indicated in these numbers,” said State Labor Commissioner Michael Thurmond. “While these layoffs are concentrated in several industries, there are some fields for which employers are actually hiring. Those include an array of positions in health services, education, retail and law enforcement.” Thurmond encourages people who’ve lost their jobs to remember the seasonal jobs available around the holidays. “While the available jobs may not represent the ideal,” Thurmond said, “people are usually better served to accept temporary employment until the job they really want comes along.” On a month-to-month basis, the number of unemployment claims went up by 23,147, or 55 percent, from September. Most of the claims were filed in construction, business services, textile manufacturing, transportation and in hotels and restaurants. “If you compare the employment rates across the country, some will argue that an unemployment rate of just over 4 percent is full employment,” Bachtel said. “We are still going through the good times. It’s going to definitely get worse.”Military Money Boosts Economy The bad economic times in Georgia’s rural areas are, at least temporarily, bolstered by the flurry of military activity. “The military has a big effect on our economy because we have major military spending in this state,” Bachtel said. “It plays a very big role in the stabilization of the economy.” And it’s a pretty safe bet for Georgians, he said. “Ft. Benning is a training area. Ft. Stewart is a staging area for deployment. Kings Bay was the largest peacetime construction project in U.S. history. Others are specialized — Ft. Gordon is home to the signal corps — not installations likely to get cut in federal budget cuts,” he said. “If you’re a supplier of goods to the military, you’re doing pretty good right now,” he said. “But the biggest effect of the war is on consumer confidence. It seems to have sparked a rise in the stock market, so who knows?”last_img read more

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