Interactions between ice and ocean observed with phase-sensitive radar near an Antarctic ice-shelf grounding line

first_imgPrecise measurements of basal melting have been made at a series of 14 sites lying within a few kilometres of the grounding line of the Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica, where the ice thickness ranges from 1570 to 1940 m. The study was conducted over the course of 1 year and included a detailed survey of the horizontal deformation, as well as phase-sensitive radar measurements of the vertical displacement of both internal reflecting horizons and the ice-shelf base. Results from the surface survey show that the long-term viscous strain rate is modulated at tidal frequencies by (probably) elastic strains of order 10−5 per metre of tidal elevation. The radar measurements show a similar modulation of the long-term thinning/thickening of the ice shelf, with thickness oscillations up to a few centimetres in range. The long-term trends in ice thickness determined at points moving with the ice-shelf flow are consistent with a steady-state thickness profile. Vertical strain rates within the ice shelf were determined from the relative motion of internal reflectors. At two sites the observations were sufficient to discern the effect of tidal bending about a neutral surface 60% of the way down the ice column. Coincident measurements of horizontal and vertical strain imply a Poisson’s ratio of 0.5, and this combined with the asymmetric bending gives rise to the observed oscillations in thickness. At a number of sites the long-term viscous strain rates were found to be a linear function of depth. For an ice shelf this is an unexpected result. It can be attributed to the presence of significant vertical shear stresses set up close to the grounding line where the ice is still adjusting to flotation. Additional vertical motion arising from firn compaction was observed within the upper layers of the ice shelf. The additional motion was consistent with the assumption that firn density is a function only of the time since burial by steady surface accumulation. With both spatial and temporal fluctuations in the vertical strain rate accurately quantified it was possible to estimate the vertical motion of the ice-shelf base in response. Differences between the calculated and observed motion of the basal reflector arise because of basal melting. Derived melt rates at the 14 sites ranged from −0.11 ± 0.31 to 2.51 ± 0.10 ma−1, with a mean of 0.85 m a−1 and a standard deviation of 0.69 m a−1, and showed no signs of significant sub-annual temporal variability. There was no obvious global correlation with either ice thickness or distance from the grounding line, although melt rates tended to decrease downstream along each of the flowlines studied. Previous estimates of basal melting in this region have been obtained indirectly from an assumption that the ice shelf is locally in equilibrium and have included a broad range of values. Only those at the lower end of the published range are consistent with the directly measured melt rates reported here.last_img read more

READ MORE

Bayonne Little League Major League Softball Championship game

first_imgCWV beat Control Services, 4-2. Caitlin Gaetani pitched CWV to the championship of the Bayonne Little League Major League Softball League. Caitlin gave up two hits, both by Emma Flores; she struck out 13 and walked five. The Controllers opened up a 2-0 lead in the top of the first, they scored both there runs on fielder’s choice plays. The Vets tied it up in the bottom of the first. Sheila O’Neill lead off with a base hit and Caitlin reached on a fielder’s choice, then they both scored on a base hit by Bella Coppola. CWV took a 3-2 lead in the third, Annie O’Neill singled an scored on an error, the Vets picked up an insurance marker in the fourth, when Annie got her second hit of the game and scored on another error.last_img

READ MORE

Bread and nutrition campaign by Federation of Bakers

first_imgThe Federation of Bakers (FOB) is to launch a campaign promoting the role of bread in the UK diet, following the publication of an updated review by the British Nutrition Foundation (BNF).FOB’s “proactive” campaign comes at a time when consumer demand for wrapped and sliced bread is at an all-time high, with it increasing as much as 50% during the health crisis, said the organisation.It is accompanied by a website refresh and a partnership with the British Dietic Association, which aims to promote positive messages about bread to its network of 9,000 food and nutrition professionals via its Healthier You initiative. The partnership, FOB added, would also allow it to disseminate the benefits of bread to a million people committed to making positive changes to their diet and lifestyle.“With bread playing an important part in a healthy balanced diet and no more so than during a time like this, it is vital that we educate people about the range of nutrients all bread delivers,” said Gordon Polson, chief executive of the FOB.“The BNF review reaffirms bread’s place as one of the UK’s favourite staple foods and is an excellent reminder of the value of bread, particularly wholegrain bread, to our diet.”The updated BNF review considered the contribution of bread (including white, wholemeal, brown and wheat germ) to nutrient intakes, the biological effects of different components of bread and the health claims related to these, as well as exploring future trends for bread.Here are some key facts from the report:Despite a marked increase in the range of different breads available to UK consumers, the amount of bread consumed in the average British diet is much lower than in the past, with bread purchases falling from 1,289g to 527g per person per week from 1960 to 2017/2018 [DEFRA 2019]. This may reflect the increased availability and popularity of other starchy foods, such as pasta and rice, and potentially negative misconceptions around bread and health, such as weight gain and gastrointestinal symptoms.In a June 2019 survey of 2,000 UK adults, 96% reported buying bread in the past month, 74% reported buying packaged sliced bread and 42% reported consuming packaged sliced bread daily [Mintel 2019].Bread provides around 11–12% of energy, 16–20% of carbohydrate, 10–12% of protein and 17–21% of fibre intakes across all age groups.White bread is the largest contributor to salt intakes in the UK, though average salt content has been declining, largely as a result of the government reformulation programme with the food industry, including the setting of salt reduction targets.Ultimately, the report highlighted “that bread continues to play an important role in the current UK diet, contributing to intakes of carbohydrate (as starch), fibre, protein and numerous vitamins and minerals including calcium, iron and thiamin”.last_img read more

READ MORE

Halloween Home Challenge coming in October

first_imgFARMINGTON – As fall and Halloween festivals are cancelled across the nation, and the trick-or-treating tradition is threatened this year, ghost, ghoul and pumpkin enthusiasts are looking for ways to safely celebrate the upcoming Halloween season.Darlene Patrick, of Loki’s Workshop Halloween Emporium, is head of Farmington Fright Nights and has come up with a solution to celebrate the holiday in a safe and festive way. Patrick has been trying to bring the haunted house scene to Farmington for several years now, but between the LEAP building explosion in 2019 and the pandemic of this year, her plans have been delayed several times. This year, she is determined to celebrate Halloween no matter what by bringing the Farmington Fright Nights’ original multi-vendor haunted house event to a more personalized level.“How can we get people excited about Halloween and still be safe?” Patrick asked herself, before coming to the idea for the Halloween Home Challenge of Franklin County.It will be a three-day house and business decorating event, running from October 29 to 31. Though downtown Farmington is what Patrick envisions as the heart of the event, anyone within the Franklin County can sign up to participate. Those wishing to be involved in the event can sign up here or at the Farmington Fright Nights’ website here. Families can sign up to be judged in one of five categories: Little Ghouls with children up to 9 years old, Tween Terrors with ages from 10 to 13, Tombstone Teens with ages from 14 to 17, or Fearsome Families or Horror Fanatics which can include all ages. The categories will assist the judges in determining what kinds of decorations they could expect from each house, based on their categories. One grand prize will be awarded, and three prizes will also be awarded for each category.“Businesses can get in on the fun by decorating downtown and the store fronts in the area. Sponsorships in the form of gift certificates or items will help promote their products,” Patrick said.Farmington Fright Nights will post the logo and a business link to any of the participating businesses on their website.“Franklin County deserves to be the place Maine thinks about when it comes to Fall and the Halloween Season. Franklin County businesses deserve to have the influx of visitors. People are searching for fun activities to do together yet apart, and this Halloween Home Challenge fits the bill,” Patrick said.After 35 years of working in the haunted attraction industry in places like New York, heading the New York Renaissance Festival as well as the Forest of Fear for several years, Patrick is ready to bring the Halloween festivities to Farmington.“Let’s make downtown Halloween City. Let’s make it a happy autumn this year,” Patrick said.A Farmington resident of three years, she hopes that if the community embraces this opportunity to paint the town in festive decorations, it will attract more people looking for things to do in Franklin county. Her plan is to encourage a new tradition of people visiting Halloween decorations every year, much like they do during the Christmas season.“Farmington has such a big sense of community. I want to be part of that,” Patrick said.last_img read more

READ MORE

Watch The Disco Biscuits’ Allen AuCoin & Tiger Party Play For Kids At Denver’s Boys and Girls Club

first_imgOn Friday, December 15th, the Colorado musical collective Tiger Party—led by the duo of singer Ashley Niven and keyboardist Blake Mobley—will take over Denver’s Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox for a blowout holiday concert, also featuring The New Mastersounds guitarist Eddie Roberts, Disco Biscuits drummer Allen Aucoin, and more. Keeping in the holiday spirit, the show will benefit Boys and Girls Club of Metro Denver, with attendees receiving a free t-shirt or Tiger Party CD if they donate a new unwrapped toy at the venue.Jackie Greene Plays Dead With Dead & Co, moe., Twiddle Members For Charity [Full Pro-Shot]Before Thanksgiving, Tiger Party along with Allen Aucoin and bassist Tim Philpott visited the Boys and Girls Club of Metro Denver, putting on a special performance for the kids at the center. Denver’s CBS4 was on the scene to capture some feel-good moments from the afternoon. You can check out video from the set below, and snag tickets to Tiger Party’s Holiday Extravaganza on Friday, December 15th at Denver’s Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox here.last_img read more

READ MORE

Tens Of Thousands Of Dead & Company Fans Took Action On This Year’s Summer Tour [Stats]

first_imgEarlier this month, Dead & Company wrapped up their 2018 summer tour with a fantastic tour closer at Boulder, CO’s Folsom Field. The two-night stint in Colorado capped a 24-date, nationwide summer trek that brought in thousands of fans each night. In addition to the music, each concert featured a Participation Row, the traveling “social action village” which incentivizes fans to engage and take action with various charitable organizations and non-profit organizations. Co-organized by two music-minded organizations—nonpartisan voter registration group HeadCount and environmental non-profit REVERB—Participation Row has been part of every Dead & Co tour dating back to the band’s debut in Fall 2015.Dead & Company has now released the final tallies from their 2018 summer tour Participation Row, and they show that fans were eager to participate. Over the course of the tour, Dead & Co fans took over 22,000 actions with the various social, environmental, and political initiatives on Participation Row.More than 6,000 new voters were engaged in the political system. Fans who took action with three non-profits at Participation Row received a numbered, limited edition VOTE pin, designed in the style of the famous “LOVE” sculpture, but with a Steal Your Face skull as the “O.” Over the duration of the tour, more than 6,000 of the pins (donated by Deadhead-run NYC accounting firm Schulman Lobel) were earned by fans for their Participation Row activism. In partnership with Nalgene, more than 4,000 reusable water bottles were distributed on Dead & Company’s summer 2018 Participation Row, preventing the use of more than 20,000 environmentally harmful disposable plastic water bottles. In addition, D’Angelico Guitars once again donated a number of custom instruments which were signed and auctioned off to raise funds for the various organizations participating in the endeavor.Notes Headcount executive director Andy Bernstein, this summer’s Participation Row brought in more than $120,000 for its participating charities, including March For Our Lives, Wavy Gravy’s SEVA, the Rainforest Action Network, the Owsley Stanley Foundation, and many more.“Everything about Dead & Company Participation Row is amazing,” says Bernstein. “The fans, the organizations, the partners and of course the band are all completely behind it. We were mobbed with people every show.”While Dead & Co tour is now over (save for two nights at LOCKN‘), HeadCount and REVERB have several more Participation Rows lined up at various events in the coming weeks, including The Decemberists‘ Traveler‘s Rest festival in Montana, the long-running Newport Folk Festival in Rhode Island, and LOCKN’ in Virginia.For more information on Participation Row, or to see how you can get involved, check out HeadCount’s website.last_img read more

READ MORE

Groups ask Board for more funding

first_imgSeveral Saint Mary’s clubs and organizations asked for more funding at the Student Government Association meeting Wednesday. SGA recently gave out allotments, which is the amount of money each club or organization receives for the year to cover start-up costs for events. The Board’s Finance Committee will take three of the five appeals into consideration. Al-Zahra, a club representing the Middle Eastern and North African cultures, appealed the money allotted to it because funds were low following their first event, Kaitlyn Sahd, president of the club, said. “The purpose of club is to try and raise awareness of Arabic culture and issues on Saint Mary’s campus,” Al-Zahra vice president Caroline Proulx said. “It’s an outlet for [Muslim students] to help express their identity and what it truly means to be Muslim in the United States.” The Board voted to have the allotment appealed and it will be presented to the Board again once the Finance Committee reviews it, Rachael Chesley, student body president, said. Circle K, a club that encourages volunteering in the community, appealed their allotment as well. Club President Amanda Garrett said entrance fees to the national organization have changed, which made it harder for the club to hold its usual events. “We do a lot of volunteer activities throughout the year,” Garrett said. “We have parties for the Center for the Homeless and work with the convent here.” The Board voted for the Finance Committee to review Circle K’s allotment. The National Student Speech-Language & Hearing Association (NSSLHA) organization on campus also attended Wednesday’s meeting in search of more funds. Katie Staak, president of the group, said a fundraising event to sell apples would not be possible year because inclement weather destroyed their supply. As a result, the group’s budget for the year has changed. But Chesley said no new information could be added during the appeal to help keep the process fair. The Board voted against the appeal. Saint Mary’s Straight and Gay Alliance (SAGA) also appealed their allotment. Karen Borja, president of the club, said the group’s executives were new to the process and didn’t understand how allotments work. Treasurer Meg Griffin said the instructions and bylaws for the allotments were included in e-mails sent to club and organization presidents, and that student government was also available for questions. The Board voted against reviewing the appeal. The Social Work Club was the last to present their appeal to SGA. President Maria Kenney said she was concerned with the allotment because the club’s events don’t reach the minimum for sponsorship through SGA and their estimated revenue from club dues was not as high as anticipated. Kenney said the club hosts events with Hope Ministries and St. Margaret’s House in South Bend during the year. SGA voted to have their allotment reviewed by the Finance Committee.last_img read more

READ MORE

Business professor concludes Spirituality Monday

first_imgProfessor of business and economics Jerry McElroy ended Saint Mary’s semester-long Spirituality Monday series with a discussion on the sacramentality of nature.“Poetry is really a sense language, what did you see, what did you hear, feel and taste, and so sacramentality means that through the window of the senses, we somehow taste and find God,” McElroy said. “I just saw this article called ‘Poetry is the Best Theology,’ and it says, ‘It imagines the unimaginable. It describes the undefinable. It’s theology leaping out of the file cabinet and into the heart. It’s the word of the word that stirs our souls.’”McElroy invited junior Rebecca Walker to read an opening poem by Fr. Gerard Manley Hopkins, an English poet and Jesuit priest of the 19th century. McElroy then read one of his own poems, the first he ever wrote and sent in for publication, “Spring Fine.” “[My wife] Birdie and I lived for many years in the tropics, and the first year we came to South Bend, the winter was like this one — the winter would never end,” McElroy said. “No one knew when spring would come. So this is a poem about when spring really started.”“In the year of the late snowmelt, no one knew when spring came, until the one day warble song rolled suddenly through the fence row and broke the chill in winter’s wake, and unexpectedly, the wild plum tree bloomed so loudly against its skin that travelers slowed just a nod. At last the cold was past, and earth would green and green again,” McElroy said, reciting his poem.   McElroy said his next poem, “Spring Delights,” drew heavily upon the senses with assistance from alliteration and irony.“As far as I know, the angels can’t smell the lavender, or smell the creek ice cracks. That’s a privilege we have,” McElroy said.  One particular poem described the odyssey of the spawning of salmon, drawing a parallel to the Holy Spirit and the Paschal Mystery, McElroy said. Another poem painted a peaceful image of an island, a sacred scene right before the break of dawn.McElroy said though he received his doctorate in economics, his interest in nature and poetry began early in his life. “I spent a lot of time observing nature,” he said. “When I was a kid on my grandad’s farm, I began to sing, so I know when to start, stop the lines.” Having already published four books, McElroy said he will release his fifth book this coming August through Finishing Line Press.“The best part is the poetry itself,” McElroy said. “If you really absorb yourself in the poetry, you’re going to get in contact with the divine eventually, because the nature is so incredible.”Tags: SMC, Spirituality Mondayslast_img read more

READ MORE

Alakazam! Broadway Balances America Will Show You the Magic of The Illusionists—Live From Broadway

first_img Want to see a magic trick? Broadway Balances America, the special six-part series airing on The Balancing Act on Lifetime Television, kicks off its third season on August 8 (the episode will re-air on August 15) with an exclusive look at the touring production of The Illusionists—Live From Broadway. Tune in as The Balancing Act takes viewers behind the scenes of the internationally-acclaimed spectacle, which has shattered box office records across the globe.In this episode, correspondents Amber Milt and Olga Villaverde get in on the act and discover what it takes to suspend disbelief for eight performances a week. Viewers will meet “The Trickster” Jeff Hobson in-studio and witness an illusion that will leave them speechless. Hobson will discuss how a theatrical, magic spectacular balances a Broadway season. The touring production showcases the jaw-dropping talents of seven of the most incredible illusionists on earth.In The Illusionists—Live From Broadway, audiences witness stunning acts of grand illusion, levitation, mind-reading, disappearance, a full view water torture escape and more. This group of world-class performers take their cue from the showmanship of the great illusionists of the past—such as Harry Houdini—and pair it with a new and updated contemporary aesthetic. Collectively, these performers have been seen by millions of people around the world and this production showcases their incredible talents together on stage for the very first time.Visit the official Broadway Balances America website to discover more about this exciting series and to find out which Broadway musicals will also be featured! ‘The Illusionists—Live From Broadway’ View Commentscenter_img Broadway Balances Americalast_img read more

READ MORE

Chris Dutton to retire from GMP, Mary Powell named CEO

first_imgMARY POWELL DESIGNATED AS GREEN MOUNTAIN POWER’SNEXT PRESIDENT AND CEO—– CEO Chris Dutton to retire August 2008 —-COLCHESTER, VT.December 4, 2007.. Mary G. Powell, 47, will become Green Mountain Power’s nextPresident and Chief Executive Officer in August 2008 when CEO Chris Dutton retires after 11years leading the Vermont electric utility, it was announced today. “We are extremely pleased that Mary Powell will succeed Chris Dutton as Green MountainPower’s new CEO, thus bringing to fruition a leadership transition plan started five years ago,”said Robert Tessier, Chair of the Green Mountain Power Board of Directors.”Mary has been a key driver in the restructuring of Green Mountain Power from a traditionalelectric utility to a high performing company that is now noted for using technology to drivecustomer satisfaction and to produce consistently strong financial results,” Mr. Tessier said inmaking known the GMP Board’s choice for a new CEO.With her promotion to the CEO position, Ms. Powell will become a member of the GreenMountain Power Board of Directors. Mr. Dutton will remain as a member of the Board followinghis retirement as CEO.Ms. Powell joined Green Mountain Power in 1998 after experience as a business owner and inbusiness management at the executive level in both the public and private sector. “I am ready and eager for this new leadership challenge to continue to create customer value andto build on the work that I have done in my 10-year association with Chris Dutton,” Ms. Powellsaid. “My focus will be further building and leveraging a strong technology platform forcustomer delivery in order to provide superior and reliable electric service in a world that is morecomplex and that demands a lighter environmental footprint. The effective replacement of ourHydro Quebec and Vermont Yankee contracts is a key focus of our leadership team and will beone of the most important decisions we make for our customers in the next decade. We plan todo that in a way that balances the needs of all stakeholders, including the climate.” Mr. Dutton, 59, said he was delighted that an executive development and leadership transitionprocess begun in 2002 has resulted in Mary’s elevation as GMP’s new CEO. “Mary Powell is quite simply one of the most talented and innovative leaders I have ever met.She is fearless as she embraces change and new thinking. Mary will lead Green Mountain Powerwith distinction and her strong common sense and clear thinking will also be an importantleadership voice for Vermont,” Mr. Dutton predicted.In announcing the future Green Mountain Power leadership, Mr. Tessier said that it was theimpressive results under Chris Dutton’s 11-year tenure as CEO that brought GMP to theattention of Gaz Metro, the Montreal-based gas distribution utility that acquired GMP earlier thisyear. “The work that Chris and his team have done in Vermont is the kind of management andleadership approach that we want as Gaz Metro seeks to expand its footprint in the NortheastUnited States,” Mr. Tessier said. “We know that with Mary Powell as Green Mountain Power’s CEO, we have the nextgeneration of leadership that fulfills our long-term strategies,” Mr. Tessier added. During Ms. Powell’s tenure at Green Mountain Power, the 92,000-customer electric distribution,transmission and utility services utility has developed three core business values: deliveringsafe, fast and effective service; being environmentally responsible; and being profitable. Green Mountain Power has been recognized for its corporate responsibility, as one of the bestplaces to work in Vermont, for its safe work environment, and in March 2003 Business Weekmagazine listed GMP on its list of top-performing small-cap companies.In February 2004, Ms. Powell was recognized by Fast Company magazine as one of the top fiftybusiness leaders in the United States for the work she led reinventing a traditional utilitycompany.Prior to joining Green Mountain Power, Ms. Powell most recently served as Senior VicePresident of Community Banking for KeyBank in Vermont. Prior to escaping to the GreenMountains, Ms. Powell worked for The Reserve Fund in New York City as the AssociateDirector of Operations. She also worked in the Human Resources Department for the State ofVermont.Ms. Powell lives in South Hero with her husband and daughter.Green Mountain Power (www.greenmountainpower.biz(link is external)) is an electric utility owned by NorthernNew England Energy Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Gaz Métro, a leading Québecenergy company with a long history of investment in Vermont. Green Mountain Powertransmits, distributes and sells electricity and utility construction services in the State of Vermontin a service territory with approximately one quarter of Vermont’s population. It servesapproximately 92,000 customers.- 30 –last_img read more

READ MORE