Letters of the week: time-wasters should cough up

first_imgKeep tribunals in perspectiveHow myheart bleeds for those poor firms who are forced to attend employmenttribunals. It’s as if none of them ever faces a legal challenge except fromdisgruntled ex-staff with no case. The CBIshould be ashamed of itself for supporting tougher rules on time-wasters (News,21 November). Most firms face legal challenges every day that have nothing todo with employment.There is asimple reason why employment tribunals have become time-consuming andexpensive: the increasing use of barristers and solicitors to prepare andpresent cases. I knowemployment law has become embroiled in regulation, but it’s not rocket science.Such activity is all down to laziness – it’s easier to hand the case to a legalexpert. Personnel staff have become further removed from the sharp end; now,there’s a real danger of lawyers becoming involved at even earlier stages inthe employment process. We’ve beenconned into believing that the only way to win a tribunal is to bat harder thanthe opposition. So in troop the barrister, the instructing solicitor andassistants, all of whom have to justify their role – and be paid. But who arethey facing? Non-represented tribunal applicants or, at worst, a trade unionofficial. Hardly justifies all this legal firepower, does it?If we wantthe tribunal process to be more efficient, we should review the need forexpensive legal advice and stop pointing the finger at a few off-the-wallapplicants. The fault can easily be laid at the employer, who ratchets up costsfor no good reason.JimHoggartReading Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. I ampleased that some form of risk is likely to be introduced for applicants atemployment tribunals (News, 21 November).Since theincrease of the upper limit of awards at tribunal, many disgruntled formeremployees see the tribunal system as an easy option for financial gain. Often,firms will make a commercial settlement on applications that bear littleresemblance to the actual circumstances of dismissal. While this makes goodshort-term business sense on an individual case basis, it does not bear up inthe long term. It just encourages others to follow suit and try a claim – anyclaim.Thissituation constipates the tribunal system, increases costs for business andunjustly tarnishes the genuine applicants, serving no one’s interests.There hasto be some consideration for the level of potential award against applicantsand their assets, although the proposal for a maximum of £5,000 will not coverthe costs of a professionally run defence by a respondent. A figure double thiswould be more realistic given the employer’s true costs – and the fact thatawards against applicants at the maximum level are likely to be few. Awards areone matter; recovery another – and no doubt another day in court. Ifintroduced, this initiative will be most welcome. It will not end all of ourfrustrations, although it should at least reduce the number of time-wastingclaims.ChrisSharpeHumanresources managerEuropean Helpdesks Weneed to focus on the key issuesThe answerto your question “Will the proposed DTI measures help prevent frivolousclaims?” (News, 21 November) is yes – and about time, too. I’m withCMS Cameron McKenna’s John Renz when he says, “It is the process that costs usso much time and money. It means we have to take our eye off the ball and endup managing failure.” Whenemployers dismiss for good reason, and do it properly, that should be it.Manufacturing in the UK for export markets is being devastated by the strengthof sterling and needs to keep focused on success to have any chance ofsurvival.EricAnderson.Viae-mail Letters of the week: time-wasters should cough upOn 5 Dec 2000 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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BHHS Congratulates O.C. Office on National Award

first_imgBerkshire Hathaway HomeServices Fox & Roach Realtors announced that the Ocean City Simpson Avenue-Ninth Street sales office is being recognized as the third quarter 2020 award winners for gross commission income and/or residential units in the entire national BHHS network of nearly 50,000 agents and 1,450 offices in 47 states. The Ocean City Ninth Street office ranked No. 1 in the northeast region for units by office size, according to a press release. BHHS is part of HomeServices of America, the nation’s largest provider of total home services and largest residential brokerage company in the U.S. in sales volume, according to the 2020 Real Trends 500 report. The company was recently awarded “Real Estate Agency Brand of the Year” and “Highest Ranked in Trust and/Love” in the 32nd annual Harris Poll EquiTrend study. With market dominance three times the market share of its nearest competitor, the brokerage completed more than 31,457 transactions in 2019.With over 5,500 sales professionals in more than 75 sales offices across the Tri-State area, the company was recently acknowledged as No. 1, for the fifth year in a row, in the entire national Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Network. Through its affiliate, the Trident Group, the company provides one-stop shopping and facilitated services to its clients including mortgage financing, and title, property and casualty insurance. The company-sponsored charitable foundation, Fox & Roach/Trident Charities, is committed to addressing the needs of children and families in stressful life circumstances and has contributed over $7.2 million to more than 250 local organizations since its inception in 1995.For more information visit www.foxroach.com. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Fox & Roach Realtors office at Ninth Street and Simpson Avenue in Ocean City.last_img read more

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Greggs opens second site in Yeovil and creates 10 jobs

first_imgGreggs has opened its second store in Yeovil and created 10 jobs.Based at Unit 5, Garret Road, the new site will join the retailer’s existing store on Middle Street and has created 10 jobs for the local community.It will feature a full menu of Greggs products, including sandwiches, savouries and sweet treats, as well as its Balanced Choice range with fewer than 400 calories.“We cannot wait to open our doors and welcome customers from the local community. We are pleased to offer customers a wide range of items, both from our more traditional ranges and from our new menus, like Balanced Choice,” said Jane Powell, shop manager at Greggs Yeovil.Other items include vegan friendly products such as its Mexican Bean & Sweet Potato Wrap, Vegan Steak Bake, Vegan Sausage Roll and Vegan Ring Doughnut.“We’re delighted to be able to invest in Yeovil, bringing new jobs to the area and providing both new and existing customers with a modern and convenient new shop,” said Roisin Currie, retail and people director at Greggs.Greggs is among the café chains that have made changes to its operations in the face of Covid-19 pandemic.last_img read more

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Beyond the ivory tower, into the world

first_imgWhen Harvard President Drew Faust interviewed former Mexican Minister of Health Julio Frenk about becoming the public health dean, Frenk asked her why she was interested in him for the post.“Because I am deeply interested in the role that universities have in tackling the biggest problems facing humankind,” Faust responded.Faust’s words were just what Frenk wanted to hear. He took the job in 2009 and has made it his mission to ensure that the work going on at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) doesn’t just sit in academic journal archives, but reaches government officials, policymakers, and health care professionals on the ground who can put it to use.“I don’t think this is peripheral, I think this is core to the University,” Frenk said.The emphasis on translating public health research into concrete implementation led to creation of the Division of Policy Translation and Leadership Development, which aims to provide HSPH faculty members with the tools they need to ensure that their research is incorporated into policy.In addition, the division recognizes that the lessons of leadership flow both ways and is working to bring hard-won experience into the School through a new senior fellowship program and an outreach program aimed at sitting ministers of health. These efforts are part of an overall strategy to adjust the orientation of the School toward a broker’s role of bringing evidence into policy, as well as serving as an expert convener in times of crisis.Frenk is passionate about the topic. He says that universities should participate in the entire circle of knowledge: its production through research, its reproduction through teaching, and its translation. That translation can come through the creation of new things — vaccines, software, and devices — or by sharing the knowledge generated by one of the largest public health research institutions with those working to improve the world.In creating the division, HSPH looked to Harvard Business School, Harvard Law School, and Harvard Kennedy School, which have close ties to executives running companies, to practicing judges and lawyers, and to sitting government officials, and for whom knowledge flows in a two-way stream from the Schools to those working in the field and back.“Public health is no longer a field of narrow specialists. It involves decision makers working on heath and the economy, national health systems, foreign policy, national security, trade, climate change, and more,” said division Director Robert Blendon.With modern technology producing new, sophisticated ways to communicate instantly with policymakers and practitioners around the world, the division has built a state-of-the-art studio on the 10th floor of HSPH’s Kresge Building. The Leadership Studio seats up to 40 and can host a variety of functions, from video conferences with multiple global participants, to faculty interviews for TV news shows, to the division’s crown jewel, a regular webcast examining public health issues, The Forum at Harvard School of Public Health.The forums take advantage of the studio’s advanced HD technology to connect expert panelists with viewers globally, offering a professionally produced program with interactive features for viewer comment. The 15 forums held so far have drawn viewers from 162 countries and have featured such prominent speakers as U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, philanthropist Ted Turner, and Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick. An emergency program immediately following the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami connected humanitarian disaster and radiation experts at Harvard with officials in Tokyo.A recent program on sleep deprivation, aired just before the “spring ahead” into daylight saving time, drew 652 viewers to the live webcast but was viewed 6,000 times on the Web during the following week. When YouTube clips, tweets, Facebook posts, transcript downloads, and other forms of interaction are included, 26,000 people engaged with the program in some way, according to Forum Director Robin Herman, who also serves as the division’s deputy director.“The Leadership Studio is a megaphone for our faculty,” Herman said. “We also call it ‘a Swiss army knife of communications capabilities.’ It’s a pretty nice-looking room as well.”In collaboration with the Harvard Kennedy School, the division seeks to open the flow of knowledge among sitting ministers of health and HSPH. According to Michael Sinclair, executive director of the division’s Ministerial Leadership Program, an inaugural event planned for June will feature 20 sitting ministers of health and is intended to be an exchange of information, with the ministers drawing on their own experiences to encourage a dialogue among colleagues. Harvard faculty members, Blendon said, will be there to help and to provide information where needed, but not necessarily to “teach” as in a typical classroom.The result, organizers hope, will be an experience that also creates a network of high-level individuals who can help each other tackle the problems that their nations face.Among those attending will be Sujatha Rao, former secretary of health and family welfare of India. Rao is also a senior leadership fellow, part of another new division program whose aim is to build closer ties to experienced health policy leaders.Rao has been interacting with HSPH faculty members, giving public talks, and, once a week for the three-month fellowship, teaching a seminar to HSPH students, sharing lessons learned in her years in a job that kept her busy “six and a half days a week” formulating budgets, testifying in Parliament, meeting with state officials, and talking to the media.“I think it can be an invaluable thing [to students]. You really are able to tell what happens in the real world. It’s not all black and white,” Rao said.The division recently learned that it won a Hauser Grant from the Harvard Initiative for Learning and Teaching for a new project to edit video from prominent visitors into clips usable in classroom teaching.  The division also includes several existing programs whose missions fit with the new emphasis on leadership, engagement, and implementation. HSPH’s Center for Continuing Professional Education plans to greatly expand its role for executive and leadership training.All in all, Frenk said, by forging closer ties to those tackling the world’s knotty public health problems, the flow of knowledge from HSPH to practitioners will improve, and so will the education of tomorrow’s public health leaders.“In addition to having superb researchers, we educate a lot of implementers. Many of our students are going to be leaders in professional practice and policymaking,” Frenk said. “This is a time of great opportunity.”last_img read more

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Mobile clinics finding their place in pandemic

first_img The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Law School’s Food Law and Policy Clinic steps up its efforts in time of pandemic Even the programs that are totally shut down are still reaching out to their populations. The Family Van, for example, while temporarily grounded, is hosting call-in hours, contacting clients directly, and distributing pamphlets and other handouts put together by the COVID-19 Health Literacy Project, a national coalition of students started by HMS first-year Pooja Chadrashekar that has translated educational and safety information into 35 languages.Some vans are distributing food and supplies to families in public housing that were living paycheck to paycheck and have lost jobs. At least one, in the Philippines, is gathering personal protection equipment from shuttered dentists’ offices and other donors, and distributing it to first responders. Some vans, like the HOMES vans associated with the Parkland Health & Hospital System, have been conscripted to serve as staging areas at COVID-19 testing megasites or triage locations in the parking lots near hospital emergency departments. Others are continuing or stepping in to do primary care, testing clients for TB in advance of their admittance to residential programs about to enter lockdown, for example, filling prescriptions, and providing basic screenings. All the vans have special precautions in place — seeing one client at a time and screening them before they enter, deep cleaning at night, and registering patients from a safe distance.“The mobile health sector has a history of thinking outside the box,” said Wallace. It’s not the first time mobile programs have stepped in to help with emergency situations — they were on the ground during hurricanes Katrina and Harvey, and have “historically risen to the occasion in what you’d call a crisis,” she said. “But this is a unique emergency. Seeing how facile and adaptable the vans and their staffs can be and the many roles they can play really shows their value, now and in the future.” How the institute converted a clinical processing lab into a large-scale COVID-19 testing facility in a matter of days Administrators, professors detail many and varied ways Harvard is trying to help, including offering use of hotel by Cambridge first-responders, health care workers University community rallies to deal with COVID-19 crisis Waste not, want not Facing a pandemic, Broad does a quick pivot With New York City hospitals already becoming overwhelmed and the expectation that health centers nationwide will soon follow suit, what place do mobile health clinics have in the battle against COVID-19? On Tuesday, the folks from Harvard Medical School’s Family Van co-hosted a webinar to take the industry’s pulse, discuss best practices, and bounce around some good ideas.The idea for the webinar came during a brainstorming session between Family Van founder and executive director Nancy Oriol, a Harvard Medical School (HMS) lecturer on Global Health and Social Medicine, and HMS first-year Ahmed Ahmed, who is interested in writing an academic paper about the mobile phenomenon and its relation to the bigger picture.“These vans tap into a community that isn’t well covered in terms of insurance and that struggles with health care literacy and equitable health outcomes,” said Ahmed. “So the mobile teams are working to see how to best utilize the vans during this time of great need for the U.S. health care system at large.”The 2,000 or so mobile clinics operating across the United States field as many as 7 million visitors a year, according to speaker Nelson C. Malone, M.D./M.P.H. ’20, who recently published an analysis of 800-plus registered users of the website Mobile Health Map, a co-sponsor of the webinar and the only comprehensive U.S. database examining the issue. Most of the clinics Malone looked at work with children, the uninsured or federally insured, low-income groups, rural communities, or urban homeless populations. “So truly our most vulnerable,” he said. “When the virus hit, we had to change what we were doing overnight and find creative solutions to help.” — Nancy Oriol, Family Van Executive Director Organized to fight the pandemic Malone called the clinics an untapped resource that will be “of utmost importance in the next few weeks [as our] most disadvantaged and underserved are at increased risk of infection and worse associated outcomes.”The clinics provide wide-ranging services, from education and prevention to screenings and primary care, while in many cases also conducting social-services outreach.That kind of flexibility has come in handy for many webinar participants since the novel coronavirus became pandemic. “Mobile clinics are very resilient and adaptable,” said Oriol. “When the virus hit, we had to change what we were doing overnight and find creative solutions to help.”While regional and smaller national webinars have been conducted in the past, this week’s call brought together a record 336 participants — more than double that of any previous online meeting. “Everything’s a moving target right now,” said Elizabeth Wallace, executive director of webinar co-sponsor  Mobile Healthcare Association, a national membership-based nonprofit headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri.  “People are looking for information and also, in this industry we don’t mind sharing to work toward the common good.” To stem the coronavirus crisis, Harvard Medical School scientists forge ahead on six key fronts Relatedlast_img read more

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RailRiders Eco-Speed-T

first_imgMy quest to find the ultimate summertime T-shirt for outdoor activity has led down many avenues. This month, the route took a turn and accelerated when it hit upon a shirt made by RailRiders, a Belmont, Mass., company with roots in the world of sailing.Today, RailRiders is more known in outdoor-adventure circles, and its clothing — which I have worn for years — is touted as the “toughest on the planet.” The company’s Eco-Speed-T is advertised to be quick-wicking, sun protective, and durable in the outdoors.I tested the shirt, which costs $36 and comes in men’s and women’s builds, in a six-hour adventure race last weekend. Temps peaked past 90 degrees and the sun blazed. I was soaked with sweat much of the day.The Eco-Speed-T at first might seem slightly too thick for hot days. It’s made of a nylon-polyester blend with a “waffle-weave” that gives it a tiny bit of bulk. But that’s where the wicking mojo comes from: Moisture and sweat are slurped off the body by this shirt and exposed to the air. At one point in the adventure race, I jumped in a lake to cool off. An hour later, after two miles of running and then 20 minutes in the wind on a bike leg, the shirt was almost bone dry.As an alternative to a cotton T-shirt, the RailRiders short-sleeve is an immense upgrade. There are mesh panels under the arms and up each side of the Eco-Speed-T for maximum airflow — a nice touch. The fabric is cited as offering UPF 20+ sun protection.The Eco-Speed-T also holds its own against some of my favorite hot-weather tops, including thinner synthetic and merino wool pieces that can cost twice as much. The thinner shirts at first feel airier than the RailRiders top, but in use they do not dry out as fast.In my quest for the perfect T, the RailRiders “waffle-weave” shirt is now near the top of my list. It’s a good value, and in my hot-weather test it proved its propensity to perform. RailRiders - Eco-Speed-T center_img Stephen Regenold is founder and editor of www.gearjunkie.com. Connect with Regenold at Facebook.com/TheGearJunkie or on Twitter via @TheGearJunkie.last_img read more

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Havyard Receives Funds for Hydrogen-Powered Project

first_imgThe Havyard project with Havila Kystruten on hydrogen-powered coastal route operations is to receive NOK 104.3 million (USD 12 million) in funding from Pilot-E.The company said that the initiative could result in vessels with up to five times longer zero-emission voyages than other existing or planned vessels.Pilot-E has stated that, with this, Havyard ASA is managing a project with ambitions to achieve zero-emission operations in the World Heritage Fjords and along parts of the new coastal route’s ordinary route, by combining batteries and hydrogen fuel cells.For several years, Havyard Group has been engaged in systematic development work and digitalisation to create greener vessels with ever decreasing energy consumption and environmentally harmful emissions.Now they have taken this work a big step further through the project FreeCO2ast. Kristian Steinsvik, head of Havyard’s R&D work, said that the project aims to develop a high-capacity hydrogen energy system and to start using it on board one of Havila Kystruten’s coastal route vessels.“This way, we can create the most environmentally friendly vessel on the Norwegian coast, and the project may also result in a technology shift in sea transport. Never before have had so many big vessels crossed such long distances with zero emissions as projected in our current plans.”The system will be installed on board and be in operation by the end of 2022.last_img read more

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Updated: Pirates kidnap 13 seafarers in the furthest offshore attack in GoG yet

first_imgKidnapping incidents within the Gulf of Guinea in 2020 are up by 20% when compared to the same time-frame in 2019. “Immediate assistance has been secured from a nearby refrigerated carrier MV Frio Chikuma which reached the Curacao Trader and provided the latter with navigation and engine room officers.    A group of armed pirates boarded a product tanker offshore Benin on Friday, July 17, and kidnapped 13 crew members, Alison Management Corp., the management company of the vessel confirmed to Offshore Energy-Green Marine. The vessel in question has been identified as the 2007-built MT Curacao Trader, owned by UK-based Lomar Shipping, according to the data from VesselsValue. The double-hulled tanker is sailing under the Liberian flag. “Alison Management Corp. wishes to advise that its prime concern remains the safety and recovery of its abducted crews and no effort shall be spared to achieve their soonest possible release,” a statement from the ship’s manager reads. Prior to the attack, the vessel departed Lomé port sailing south before its speed dropped to 3 knots at the indicated time of the attack, Dryad said. With the latest incident, the total number of the kidnapped crew within the Gulf of Guinea has risen to 93 across 18 kidnapping incidents. “Despite the presence of speedboats, it remains highly likely that the perpetrators are being supported by a larger mother vessel, allowing them to sustain deep offshore operations beyond state counter piracy efforts,” the maritime security firm added. The statement was issued on the back of a report from maritime security firm Dryad Global which claimed that 15 seafarers were taken hostage. The company said that both the hijacked ship and the rescue reefer arrived safely in port anchorage. Curacao Trader; Image courtesy: Lomar Shipping Alison Management said that its vessel was attacked by pirates approximately 210 miles of the coast of Benin at 1100 hrs. local time on July 17th. The location of this incident is the furthest offshore an act of piracy has been recorded within the Gulf of Guinea, Dryad pointed out. “13 out of its 19 Ukrainian and Russian crew members have been taken hostage by the pirates, who left only unqualified seamen on board the ship – as a result, the ship was left drifting with limited manpower on board. The total volume of personnel kidnapped in maritime incidents within the Gulf of Guinea is up by 47% year-on-year.last_img read more

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NZ parents want tougher stance on class discipline

first_imgSunday Star Times 20 May 2012Increasing numbers of fed-up parents want schools to get tough on discipline.A recent international study ranked New Zealand students among the worst-behaved in the world, and Secondary Principals’ Association president Patrick Walsh said there was a sea change in how discipline was perceived in schools.“The public and parents are becoming less tolerant with the restorative justice approach, and want schools to get tough on serious offenders.”While a restorative justice approach had been widely adopted, research showed children’s behaviour had grown worse in the past decade, with sexual and physical assaults increasing.Almost three-quarters – 71 per cent – of respondents in a Sunday Star-Times reader poll, said discipline was lacking in our schools, and blamed the rise in bad behaviour on the loss of discipline at home and a lack of respect among young people.Walsh said many of the worst-behaved students came to school with violence or sexual deviance learned at home, and it was a difficult balancing act between rehabilitating students and ensuring the safety of others.http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/education/6953255/NZ-parents-want-tougher-stance-on-class-disciplinelast_img read more

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Coaches Corner Monday Night On WRBI (11-18)

first_imgListen Monday Night (11-18) to The Sports Voice-Country 103.9 WRBI for Southeastern Indiana’s Top Local Sports Show, Coaches, Corner with Hall of Famer Ron Raver at Ison’s Family Pizza starting at 6.Guests include Dan Kerker-Oldenburg Academy Girls Basketball Coach,  Kevin Moore-East Central Girls Basketball Coach, and Dereck Cox-Batesville Girls Basketball Coach.Kudos to The Crew at Ison’s Family Pizza for hosting Coaches Corner.last_img

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